Radiolab Podcast


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    Radiolab - Numbers Amanda Aronczyk, Frank Benford, Susan Carey, Stanislas Dehaene

    56:37

    Radiolab - Numbers [Amanda Aronczyk, Frank Benford, Susan Carey, Stanislas Dehaene, Darrell D. Dorrell, Jerry Grossman, Paul Hoffman, Joel Spencer, Steve Strogatz and Karen Wynn]
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    Whether you love 'em or hate 'em, chances are you rely on numbers every day of your life. Where do they come from, and what do they really do for us? This hour: stories of how numbers confuse us, connect us, and even reveal secrets about us.
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    Radiolab - Helicopter Boy a story about a mom, a boy, and a home-made helicopter

    15:06

    Radiolab - Helicopter Boy [a story about a mom, a boy, and a home-made helicopter]
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    In this podcast, a story about a mom, a boy, and a home-made helicopter.

    (And no! This has nothing to do with the Balloon Boy incident.) Instead, it's about how public radio...literally saved a boy's life. Well, not quite. But sorta. Kinda. It's a story about why we do what we do: we're trying to tell stories that move you and make you feel different about the world, even just a little bit.
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    Radiolab - After Birth Charles Fernyhough

    9:55

    Radiolab - After Birth [Charles Fernyhough]
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    Pardon the graphic pun, but hey! For this podcast, Jad--a brand new father--wonders what's going on inside the head of his baby Amil.

    (And don't worry, you don't need kids to enjoy this podcast.) The questions here are big: what is it like to be so brand new to the world? None of us have memories from this time, so how could we possibly ever know? Is it just chaos? Or, is there something more, some understanding from the very beginning? Jad found a development psychologist named Charles Fernyhough to explore some of his questions.
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    Radiolab - The Bus Stop Lulu Miller

    13:03

    Radiolab - The Bus Stop [Lulu Miller]
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    There’s a common problem faced by Alzheimer's and Dementia patients all over the world: lost in their memories, they sometimes get disoriented, and wander off. In this podcast, Lulu Miller talks to a nursing home in Düsseldorf, Germany that came up with a novel solution.

    When an Alzheimer's or Dementia patient wanders, they can end up too far from home, frightened, or hurt. So what are you supposed to do if your loved one--a parent, a grandparent--begins to wander in this way? Often times the only solution is to lock them up. Which just feels cruel. But what else are you supposed to do if you want to keep them safe?

    Well, the Benrath Senior Center, came up with a new idea. An idea so simple you almost think it couldn't work. Producer Lulu Miller talks to Richard Neureither and Regine Hauch about what they've done in Düsseldorf.
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    Radiolab - Vanishing Words Dr. Ian Lancashire

    15:19

    Radiolab - Vanishing Words [Dr. Ian Lancashire]
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    Agatha Christie's clever detective novels may reveal more about the inner workings of the human mind than she intended. In this podcast, a look at what scientists uncover when they treat words like data.

    According to Dr. Ian Lancashire at the University of Toronto, the Queen of Crime left behind hidden clues to the real-life mysteries of human aging in her writing. Meanwhile, Dr. Kelvin Lim and Dr. Serguei Pakhomov from the University of Minnesota add to the intrigue with the story of an unexpected find in a convent archive that could someday help pinpoint very early warning signs for Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Sister Alberta Sheridan, a 94-year-old Nun Study participant, reads an essay she wrote more than 70 years ago.
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    Radiolab - Killing Babies, Saving the World Josh Greene

    18:30

    Radiolab - Killing Babies, Saving the World [Josh Greene]
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    To get this podcast started, Robert ambushes Jad with a question...a question we've all been dying to ask him since June 10th, 2009, when Amil Abumrad came into the world.
    But fear not, we didn't do a whole podcast just to give the new dad a hard time. Robert talks to Josh Greene, the Harvard professor we had on our Morality show. They revisit some ideas from that show in the context of the big, complicated problems of today (think global warming and nuclear war). Josh argues that to deal with those problems, we're going to have to learn how to make better use of that tiny part of our brain that handles abstract thinking. Not a simple proposition, but, despite the odds, Josh has hope.
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    Radiolab - Oops Alston Chase, Michael Cohen, Edwin Dobb, Barret Golding, Ruben Gur

    57:55

    Radiolab - Oops [Alston Chase, Michael Cohen, Edwin Dobb, Barret Golding, Ruben Gur, Rita Halbeisen, Ron Lanner, Andrea Stierle, Don Stierle, Pat Walters and Ben Zimmer]
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    Oops. In this hour of Radiolab, stories of unintended consequences.

    You come up with a great idea. You devise a plan. You control for every imaginable variable. And once everything’s in place, the train hops your carefully laid tracks. In this episode, one psychologist's zeal to safeguard national security may have created a terrorist, while one community's efforts to protect an endangered bird had deadly consequences. And against all odds, a toxic lake spawns new life.
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    Radiolab - Placebo Dr. Naji Abumrad, Fabrizio Benedetti, preacher Steve Buza, Dr. Daniel Carr

    57:17

    Radiolab - Placebo [Dr. Naji Abumrad, Fabrizio Benedetti, preacher Steve Buza, Dr. Daniel Carr, Ed Cohen, Ann Harrington, Dr. Albert Mason, Daniel Moerman and Tor Wager]
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    With new research demonstrating the startling power of the placebo effect, this hour of Radiolab examines the chemical consequences of belief and imagination.
    Could the best medicine be no medicine at all? We take stock of the pharmacy in our brains, consider the symbolic power of the doctor coat, and visit the tent of a self-proclaimed faith healer.
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    Radiolab - The Shy Baboon Barbara Smuts

    9:30

    Radiolab - The Shy Baboon [Barbara Smuts]
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    In this podcast, a biopsychologist attempts to find an elusive bit of shared space across species lines.

    Barbara Smuts, a professor at the University of Michigan, tells the story of trying to gain the trust of a troop of baboons in a remote area of Kenya in the 1970s.
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    Radiolab - In C Michael Lowenstern and Zoe Keating

    18:58

    Radiolab - In C [Michael Lowenstern and Zoe Keating]
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    Ok, so last podcast you heard counting babies. Here’s a new spin...

    Not too long ago, Jad was invited to contribute to In C Remixed, a compilation of remixed versions of the 1964 Terry Riley piece that quietly changed the world of classical music (and eventually pop music too). In this podcast, Jad talks to musicians Michael Lowenstern and Zoe Keating about their remixes, what they did and why. Then Jad plays Robert his own kaleidoscopic remix of In C: minimalism as seen through the lenses of fatherhood and Radiolab. For his version, Jad threw a few counting babies into the musical mix (actually, only one of the babies can count ... the one that isn’t his).

    Special thanks to Amanda Aronczyk and her daughter Mina (the baby who actually counts), to Bill Ryan and the Grand Valley State New Music Ensemble, and to Silas Brown and Jennifer Munson (for their engineering expertise).
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    Radiolab - Fu Manchu Ben Calhoun

    11:44

    Radiolab - Fu Manchu [Ben Calhoun]
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    In our episode Animal Minds, we asked whether it was possible for one animal to know what was going on in another animal's mind. For us, it was a really about whether we, as humans, can really share a meaningful moment with an animal. In this podcast, we take that question another step further.
    Can an animal know what's in our heads so well that they can manipulate and deceive us? To answer that question, reporter Ben Calhoun takes us back to the 1960s to tell the story of a showdown between zookeeper Jerry Stones and a wily orangutan named Fu Manchu. Then, to help us get a grip on the science behind animals and deception, Ben talks to primatologist and orangutan expert Rob Shumaker of the Indianapolis Zoo.

    Sorry photo is not actually Fu Manchu.
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    Radiolab - Animal Minds Patrick Hof, Alexandra Horowitz, Jonah Lehrer, Paul Nicklen, Paul Theroux

    57:17

    Radiolab - Animal Minds [Patrick Hof, Alexandra Horowitz, Jonah Lehrer, Paul Nicklen, Paul Theroux and Clive Wynne]
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    In this hour of Radiolab, stories of cross-species communication.

    When we gaze into the eyes of a wild animal, or even a beloved pet, can we ever really know what they might be thinking? Is it naive to assume they're experiencing something close to human emotions? Or is it ridiculous to assume that they AREN'T feeling something like that? We get the story of a rescued whale that may have found a way to say thanks, ask whether dogs feel guilt, and wonder if a successful predator may have fallen in love with a photographer.
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    Radiolab - Do I Know You? Dr. Carol Berman and Dr. V.S. Ramachandran

    8:15

    Radiolab - Do I Know You? [Dr. Carol Berman and Dr. V.S. Ramachandran]
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    How do you know your mother is really your mother? It's simple, right? You look at her, you recognize her, enough said. Well, in this podcast...it may not be that simple.

    It turns out that recognizing people, even the people we know the best, is more about how they make us feel than what we see in front of our eyes. And when your feelings about someone get jumbled, it can be disorienting, even traumatic. In this the podcast we talk to Dr. Carol Berman and Dr. V.S. Ramachandran to explore the psychology and neurology behind a rare but disturbing delusional disorder called Capgras.
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    Radiolab - The Loudest Miniature Fuzz Buke and Gass

    13:17

    Radiolab - The Loudest Miniature Fuzz [Buke and Gass]
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    Music duo Buke and Gass play for us, attempt to describe their genre-bending sound, and talk a bit about what's it like to play out what you don't say in this podcast.

    Buke and Gass (pronounced 'Buke and Gase') produce weird and wonderful, twangy and chaotic sounds with their homemade instruments. Though they sound like a whole rip-roaring party of bodies, the band is in fact only comprised of two people: Arone Dyer and Aron Sanchez.

    Also, for those of you wondering about AWE-MAGEDDON, our live event series, here's an excerpt from our first show!

    Iain Couzin is an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, where he studies collective behaviors within animal groups.
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    Radiolab - Words Charles Fernyhough, Susan Schaller, Ann Senghas, James Shapiro, Elizabeth Spelke

    57:09

    Radiolab - Words [Charles Fernyhough, Susan Schaller, Ann Senghas, James Shapiro, Elizabeth Spelke and Jill Bolte Taylor]
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    It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without words. But this hour, we try to do just that.

    We meet a woman who taught a 27-year-old man the first words of his life, hear a firsthand account of what it feels like to have the language center of your brain wiped out by a stroke, and retrace the birth of a brand new language 30 years ago
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    Radiolab - It Might Be Science Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich with John Flansburg

    36:42

    Radiolab - It Might Be Science [Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich with John Flansburg]
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    They Might Be Giants just came out with a new album, 'Here Comes Science.' So we invited them to come play with us at our season launch party last week at the Water Taxi Beach in Queens. And then we ambushed them with annoying little questions about science and about the tricky business of turning science into entertainment ... because of that whole, you know, 'getting the facts right' thing.

    On this podcast, we decided to share this magical evening with those of you who weren't able to join us live. Hope you enjoy the music, pesky science teachers, and miasmas of plasma.
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    Radiolab - An Ice-Cold Case Aaron Birk, Jim Dickson, Andy Mills and Albert Zinc

    20:18

    Radiolab - An Ice-Cold Case [Aaron Birk, Jim Dickson, Andy Mills and Albert Zinc]
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    Scientists' obsession with one particular man - and with the tiny scraps of evidence left in the wake of his death - gives us a surprisingly intimate peek into the life of someone who should've been lost to the ages.
    A little over 20 years ago, a perfectly preserved corpse was found buried in the ice, high up in the Alps. And after decades of investigating, cutting-edge forensics have revealed not only a murder mystery, but a startling story about one man's final days.

    When hikers first found Ötzi (the nickname given to the body discovered in 1991), everyone assumed they'd stumbled upon an unfortunate mountaineering accident. But as the body was pulled from the ice, authorities started to suspect this wasn't a modern-day adventure gone wrong. It was, as producer Andy Mills explains, an OLD body. Really, really old.

    Botanist Jim Dickson, graphic artist Aaron Birk, and Albert Zinc, head of the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman, describe how scientific advances and modern forensic breakthroughs have uncovered an ancient tale of violence and humanity.
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    Radiolab - Secrets of Success Malcolm Gladwell

    24:07

    Radiolab - Secrets of Success [Malcolm Gladwell]
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    Malcolm Gladwell doesn't like Gifted and Talented Education Programs. And he doesn't believe that innate ability can fully explain superstar hockey players or billionaire software giants. In this podcast, we listen in on a conversation between Robert and Malcolm recorded at the 92nd St Y.
    Robert asks Malcolm if he's a 'genius denier,' and Malcolm asks Robert if he's uncomfortable with the power of love, as they duke it out over questions of luck, talent, passion, and success.
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    Radiolab - Parasites Dickson Despommier, Dr. Robert Sapolsky, Fuller Torrey, Pat Walters

    57:01

    Radiolab - Parasites [Dickson Despommier, Dr. Robert Sapolsky, Fuller Torrey, Pat Walters and Carl Zimmer]
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    What's gotten into you? In this hour, Radiolab uncovers a world full of parasites.

    Could parasites be the shadowy hands that pull the strings of life? We explore nature's moochers, with tales of lethargic farmers, zombie cockroaches, and even mind-controlled humans (kinda, maybe). And we examine claims that some parasites may actually be good for you.
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    Radiolab - Escape! Edward Dolnick, Ann Druyan, Phil Lapsley, Ben Montgomery and Merav Opher

    1:6:33

    Radiolab - Escape! [Edward Dolnick, Ann Druyan, Phil Lapsley, Ben Montgomery and Merav Opher]
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    The walls are closing in, you've got no way out... and then, suddenly, you escape! This hour, stories about traps, getaways, perpetual cycles, and staggering breakthroughs.
    We kick things off with a true escape artist--a man who’s broken out of jail more times than anyone alive. We try to figure out why he keeps running... and whether he will ever stop. Then, the ingeniously simple question that led Isaac Newton to an enormous intellectual breakthrough: why doesn’t the moon fall out of the sky? In the wake of Newton's new idea, we find ourselves in a strange space at the edge of the solar system, about to cross a boundary beyond which we know nothing. Finally, we hear the story of a blind kid who freed himself from an unhappy childhood by climbing into the telephone system, and bending it to his will.
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    Radiolab - Deception Gordon Burghardt, Paul Ekman, Ruben Gur, Barry L. McManus, Harold Sackeim

    56:45

    Radiolab - Deception [Gordon Burghardt, Paul Ekman, Ruben Gur, Barry L. McManus, Harold Sackeim, Steve Silberman, Joanna Starek and Yaling Yang]
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    Lies, liars, and lie catchers. This hour of Radiolab asks if it's possible for anyone to lead a life without deception.
    We consult a cast of characters, from pathological liars to lying snakes to drunken psychiatrists, to try and understand the strange power of lying to yourself and others.
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    Radiolab - Nukes Bruce Blair, Tony De Brum, Harold Herring, Sonya McMullen, William Perry

    41:07

    Radiolab - Nukes [Bruce Blair, Tony De Brum, Harold Herring, Sonya McMullen, Secretary of Defense William Perry and Alex Wellerstein]
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    President Richard Nixon once boasted that at any moment he could pick up a telephone and - in 20 minutes - kill 60 million people. Such is the power of the US President over the nation’s nuclear arsenal. But what if you were the military officer on the receiving end of that phone call? Could you refuse the order?

    This episode, we profile one Air Force Major who asked that question back in the 1970s and learn how the very act of asking it was so dangerous it derailed his career. We also pick up the question ourselves and pose it to veterans both high and low on the nuclear chain of command. Their responses reveal once and for all whether there are any legal checks and balances between us and a phone call for Armageddon.
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    Radiolab - Blame Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich

    1:3:43

    Radiolab - Blame [Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich]
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    We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?
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    Radiolab - Limits Patrick Autissier, Daniel Coyle, Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Wendy Ingraham

    59:28

    Radiolab - Limits [Patrick Autissier, Daniel Coyle, Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Wendy Ingraham, David Jones, Jonah Lehrer, Dr. Hod Lipson, Julie Moss, Jure Robic, Michael Schmidt, Steve Strogatz, Gurol Suel and Ron White]
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    On this hour of Radiolab: a journey to the edge of human limits.

    How much can you jam into a human brain? How far can you push yourself past feelings of exhaustion? We test physical endurance with a bike race that makes the Tour de France look like child’s play, and mental capacity with a mind-stretching memory competition. And we ask if robots--for better or worse--may be forging beyond the limits of human understanding.
    Correction: An earlier version of this piece stated in error that Mr. S. remembered what his editor had assigned all the reporters at the newspaper. In A.R. Luria’s book, there is mention only of Mr. S. remembering his own assignments. We also inaccurately stated the rate at which Mr. S. could recall numbers. The actual rate was 50 numbers in 2.5-3 minutes. We also incorrectly stated that Mr. S. memorized Dante's “Inferno.” In fact, Mr. S. memorized only the first several stanzas. In addition, we depicted details of Mr. S.’s mnemonic performances without making clear that they were based in part on supposition. The audio has been adjusted to correct these facts and clarify our suppositions.
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    Radiolab - Time Brian Greene, Jay Griffiths, Ben Rubin, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Rebecca Solnit

    57:55

    Radiolab - Time [Brian Greene, Jay Griffiths, Ben Rubin, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Rebecca Solnit]
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    Jorge Luis Borges wrote, Time is the substance from which I am made. Time is a river which carries me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger that devours me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire that consumes me, but I am the fire. And it’s still as close a definition as we have. This hour of Radiolab, we try our hand at unlocking the mysteries of time. We stretch and bend it, wrestle with its subjective nature, and wrap our minds around strategies to standardize it...stopping along the way at a 19th-century railroad station in Ohio, a track meet, and a Beethoven concert.
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    Radiolab - The Bad Show Dr. David Buss, Dan Charles, Alex Haslam, Jeff Jensen, Frederick Kaufman

    1:5:11

    Radiolab - The Bad Show [Dr. David Buss, Dan Charles, Alex Haslam, Jeff Jensen, Frederick Kaufman, Sam Kean, Latif Nasser, James Shapiro, Fritz Stern and Benjamen Walker]
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    Cruelty, violence, badness... This episode of Radiolab, we wrestle with the dark side of human nature, and ask whether it's something we can ever really understand, or fully escape.
    We begin with a chilling statistic: 91% of men, and 84% of women, have fantasized about killing someone. We take a look at one particular fantasy lurking behind these numbers, and wonder what this shadow world might tell us about ourselves and our neighbors. Then, we reconsider what Stanley Milgram's famous experiment really revealed about human nature (it's both better and worse than we thought). Next, we meet a man who scrambles our notions of good and evil: chemist Fritz Haber, who won a Nobel Prize in 1918...around the same time officials in the US were calling him a war criminal. And we end with the story of a man who chased one of the most prolific serial killers in US history, then got a chance to ask him the question that had haunted him for years: why?
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    Radiolab - Talking to Machines Freedom Baird, Rollo Carpenter, Brian Christian, Caleb Chung

    1:3:10

    Radiolab - Talking to Machines [Freedom Baird, Rollo Carpenter, Brian Christian, Caleb Chung, Dr. Robert Epstein]
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    This hour of Radiolab, Jad and Robert meet humans and robots who are trying to connect, and blur the line.
    We begin with a love story--from a man who unwittingly fell in love with a chatbot on an online dating site. Then, we encounter a robot therapist whose inventor became so unnerved by its success that he pulled the plug. And we talk to the man who coded Cleverbot, a software program that learns from every new line of conversation it receives...and that's chatting with more than 3 million humans each month. Then, five intrepid kids help us test a hypothesis about a toy designed to push our buttons, and play on our human empathy. And we meet a robot built to be so sentient that its creators hope it will one day have a consciousness, and a life, all its own.
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    Radiolab - REBROADCAST: Detective Stories

    58:00

    Radiolab - REBROADCAST: Detective Stories
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    We're celebrating summer with a classic episode of Radiolab--full of mystery, intrigue...and a goat standing on a cow. We haven't actually tried listening to it around a campfire, but we're betting it would totally work. See you in two weeks with a new short!
    In the meantime, we go sleuthing to dig up the past in some very unusual places: an ancient trash dump in Egypt, the side of the highway in California, and in the blood of 16 million men in Central Asia.
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    Radiolab - The Gondolier Kristen Clark and David Conrad

    54:11

    Radiolab - The Gondolier [Kristen Clark and David Conrad]
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    We travel to Venice, Italy with reporters Kristen Clark and David Conrad, where they meet gondolier Alex Hai. On the winding canals in the most hidden parts of Venice, we learn about the nearly millenia old tradition of the Venetian Gondolier, and how Alex was forced into a 20 year battle against this job that he loved, and, in some ways, himself.

    Reported by David Conrad and Kristen Clark. Produced by Annie McEwen and Molly Webster.

    Special thanks to Alexis Ungerer, Summer, Alex Hai, Kevin Gotkin, Silvia Del Fabbro, Sandro Mariot, Aldo Rosso and Marta Vannucci, The Longest Shortest Time (Hillary Frank, Peter Clowney and Abigail Keel), Tim Howard, Nick Adams/GLAAD, Valentina Powers, Florence Ursino, Ann Marie Somma, Alex Overington, Jeremy Bloom and the people of Little Italy.
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    Radiolab - Famous Tumors Christo Baars, Orrin Devinsky, Dr. Stanley Gartler, Dr. George Gey

    56:45

    Radiolab - Famous Tumors [Christo Baars, Orrin Devinsky, Dr. Stanley Gartler, Dr. George Gey, Carlo Maley, Dr. Adrianne Noe, Anne-Marie Pearse, David Quammen, Mark Salzman, Rebecca Skloot and Brian Spatola]
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    In this hour of Radiolab: an unflinching look at the good, bad, and ugly side of tumors.
    Say hello to the growth that killed Ulysses S. Grant, meet Tasmanian Devils battling contagious tumors, and get to know the woman whose cancer cells changed modern medicine.
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    Radiolab and NPR Present Words

    3:05

    A stunning film from Will Hoffman and Daniel Mercadante to accompany Radiolab's Words episode. With an original score by Keith Kenniff.
    Radiolab's Words episode:
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    Radiolab: Dinopocalypse!

    51:13

    The startling specifics of how dinosaurs were wiped off the planet.

    More from Radiolab at

    From Radiolab's stage show Apocalyptical, recorded live in Seattle.

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    Walter Murch: The Conversation with Terry Diggs on his films 40th Anniversary

    57:29

    Cinephile & UC Hastings Law Professor Terry Kay Diggs talks with Academy Award winning director Walter Murch. The acclaimed film director worked closely with Francis Ford Coppola on this prescient film to show us 40 years ago exactly how the loss of privacy will look. . .

    Released in 1974, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, won international awards for its writing and technological effects. An arresting thriller, The Conversation offers a still-unparalleled disquisition on the reasonable expectation of privacy.

    Forty years later, we live in Coppola’s world, consumed again by questions of who is watching, reading, listening, or monitoring – tottering through the coincidence of astounding events: a Supreme Court once again prepared to redefine the Fourth Amendment (United States v. Jones, “the G.P.S. case”); a tech industry hawking Google Glass and compiling Facebook-based dossiers; the unchecked government surveillance exposed by Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning.

    This talk recorded at UC Hastings in San Francisco in November 2014. Professor Diggs has since been sidelined with a devastating brain tumor, and this was perhaps her final public appearance, and one of the highlights of her academic career.

    Building on a background as a lawyer, writer and critical theorist, the late Terry Diggs developed Film-Law-Social Conflict, an educational seminar series she began teaching in the early 1990s, she was a brilliant scholar, critic and educator before passing away in February 2016.

    More info on this conference organized by Diggs is here :

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    #588: Mind Games 2016

    59:53

    Stories of people who try simple mind games on others, and then find themselves in way over their heads.

    Official free, weekly podcast of the award-winning radio show This American Life. First-person stories and short fiction pieces that are touching, funny, and surprising. Hosted by Ira Glass, from WBEZ Chicago Public Media, and distributed by Public Radio International. In mp3 and updated Mondays.

    © Copyright 1995-2016 Ira Glass

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    Radiolab Live: Apocalyptical FULL SHOW

    2:1:56

    Dinosaurs, death, and destruction -- a thought-provoking and laughter-inducing dance on the grave of our inevitable demise.

    More from Radiolab at

    Cataclysmic destruction. Surprising survival. Radiolab turns its gaze to the topic of endings, both blazingly fast and agonizingly slow, in its live show Apocalyptical. With their signature blend of storytelling, science, and music, hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich romp through hundreds of millions of years of history to arrive at the end, again and again. Comedians Reggie Watts and Kurt Braunohler join the party, while musicians On Fillmore and Noveller create a cinematic live score before your eyes. Recorded live on stage in Seattle.

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