Radiolab Podcast


  • x
  • desc

    Radiolab - Sleep Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima, Dr. Allan Pack, Hannah Palin, Dr. Carlos Schenck

    55:24

    Radiolab - Sleep [Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima, Dr. Allan Pack, Hannah Palin, Dr. Carlos Schenck, Robert Stickgold, Dr. Giulio Tononi and Matt Wilson]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Birds do it, bees do it...yet science still can't answer the basic question: why do we sleep?
    Every creature on the planet sleeps--from giant humpback whales to teeny fruit flies. What does it do for us, and what happens when we go without? We take a peek at iguanas sleeping with one eye open, get in bed with a pair of sleep-deprived new parents, and eavesdrop on the uneasy dreams of rats.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - The Story of Me V.S.Ramachandran

    21:10

    Radiolab - The Story of Me [V.S.Ramachandran]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We visit U.C. San Diego Neurologist, V.S.Ramachandran who tells us about the evolution of human consciousness…or the difference between the way we think of some abstraction, like love and the way a baboon thinks of a rear end. Something in the way our brain operates tells us about our ability to imagine and perceive ourselves. Paul Broks, author of Into the Silent Land, invites us into his childhood dreams, inhabited by tiny little men whom he had no control over. Robert Louis Stevenson, famed spinner of dark tales, had his own little men in his head, that he exploited for fame and profit.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • x
  • desc

    Radiolab - Growing Up is Awfuler than All the Awful things that Ever Were

    14:51

    Radiolab - Growing Up is Awfuler than All the Awful things that Ever Were
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We now know that too much stress makes you sick. Fifty years ago, we had no idea. Credit an upholsterer, a chair, and some lab rats. Dr. Paul J. Rosch, President of the American Institute of Stress, describes a series of not so nice things he and his colleagues did to rodents which began to illuminate what it means to be stressed out. Dr. Robert Sapolsky takes us to the edges of our seats, literally, as he explains the discovery of Type A personality, and why being a Type A person is worse for you then smoking. Speaking of chairs, upholsterer Charles Young helps us smooth our wrinkles. And we conclude this segment with a trip to one of the truly bizarre outposts of medicine - stressed dwafism - and story of a much beloved author caught in a body that never grew up.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Memory and Forgetting Painter Joe Andoe, Andrei Codrescu, Joe LeDoux, Jonah Lehrer

    56:32

    Radiolab - Memory and Forgetting [Painter Joe Andoe, Andrei Codrescu, Joe LeDoux, Jonah Lehrer, Dr. Elizabeth Loftus, Karim Nader, Neda Pourang, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Deborah Wearing]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hour of Radiolab, a look behind the curtain of how memories are made...and forgotten.
    Remembering is an unstable and profoundly unreliable process--it’s easy come, easy go as we learn how true memories can be obliterated, and false ones added. And Oliver Sacks joins us to tell the story of an amnesiac whose love for his wife and music transcend his 7-second memory.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Take a deep breath -- hold it -- now exhale Dr. Kamran Fallahpour

    20:45

    Radiolab - Take a deep breath -- hold it -- now exhale [Dr. Kamran Fallahpour]
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We can’t control stress, but what we can do is understand it. Neuropsychologist Dr. Kamran Fallahpour lets us listen to the sound of our own stress (a sort of a high pitched whine). His theory is that if you can hear your stress you can control it. Not to say all stress is bad: MTV producer Colby Hall battles a boat propellor and survives by virtue of stress hormones. Dr. Robert Sapolsky explains how it works - stress hormones shut down pain, often leaving the victim the calmest person at the scene.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • x
  • desc

    Radiolab - Beyond Time Brian Greene, Dr. Michio Kaku, David McDermott, Dr. V.S. Ramachandran

    57:05

    Radiolab - Beyond Time [Brian Greene, Dr. Michio Kaku, David McDermott, Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Lisa Randall and Terry Wilcox]
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hour, Radiolab goes to the front lines with men and women who are battling against time -- or at least the common-sense view of time.
    Einstein's Theory of Relativity may have implications on the concept of choice. Namely, that there is none. Do we choose what movie to see tonight? No. (It's already been chosen, some say.) Do we choose to wiggle our finger? No. (Already wiggled.) We'll visit a particle accelerator where scientists recreate the moment just after the beginning of time, and a Dublin artist whose life is a 19th-century time experiment. We end in the Mojave desert, where geologic time flows like a frozen hourglass.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - After Life Ken Baldwin, Paul Broks, David Eagleman, Gary Greenberg

    57:07

    Radiolab - After Life [Ken Baldwin, Paul Broks, David Eagleman, Gary Greenberg, Adrian Owen, Lee Silver, Jeffrey Tambor, John Troyer, Emily Voigt, Peter Ward and Jan Zalasiewicz]
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hour: Radiolab stares down the very moment of passing, and speculates about what may lie beyond.
    What happens at the moment when we slip from life...to the other side? Is it a moment? If it is, when exactly does it happen? And what happens afterward? It's a show of questions that don't have easy answers. So, in a slight departure from our regular format, we bring you eleven meditations on how, when, and even if we die.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - The Robert Krulwich and Brian Greene

    52:06

    Radiolab - The (Multi) Universe(s) [Robert Krulwich and Brian Greene]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Robert and Brian Greene discuss what's beyond the horizon of our universe, what you might wear in infinite universes with finite pairs of designer shoes, and why the Universe and swiss cheese have more in common than you think.
    Have you wondered if there is another you out there? Somewhere? Sitting in the same chair, reading the same blog post, wearing the same clothes and thinking the same thoughts? Well, Brian Greene says there must be one. Or two. Or lots and lots and lots and lots and... Why? You ask, well listen to Greene's argument in this week's podcast.

    We are still furiously working on Season 5, so while you wait we bring you today's podcast of a conversation between Robert Krulwich and Brian Greene, physics and mathematics professor and director of the Institute of Strings, Cosmology, and Astroparticle Physics at Columbia University. The interview is part of a series called 'Giants of Science' hosted by venerable New York institution, the 92nd St Y.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Truth Trolls

    20:15

    All credit goes to Radiolab.

  • x
  • desc

    Radiolab - Time Brian Greene, Jay Griffiths, Ben Rubin, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Rebecca Solnit

    57:55

    Radiolab - Time [Brian Greene, Jay Griffiths, Ben Rubin, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Rebecca Solnit]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jorge Luis Borges wrote, Time is the substance from which I am made. Time is a river which carries me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger that devours me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire that consumes me, but I am the fire. And it’s still as close a definition as we have. This hour of Radiolab, we try our hand at unlocking the mysteries of time. We stretch and bend it, wrestle with its subjective nature, and wrap our minds around strategies to standardize it...stopping along the way at a 19th-century railroad station in Ohio, a track meet, and a Beethoven concert.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Dr. Paul J. Rosch Explains How Stress Affects the Heart

    7:03

    Excerpt from the documentary film STATIN NATION. For more information, please visit statinnation.net

  • desc

    Radiolab - REBROADCAST: Detective Stories

    58:00

    Radiolab - REBROADCAST: Detective Stories
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We're celebrating summer with a classic episode of Radiolab--full of mystery, intrigue...and a goat standing on a cow. We haven't actually tried listening to it around a campfire, but we're betting it would totally work. See you in two weeks with a new short!
    In the meantime, we go sleuthing to dig up the past in some very unusual places: an ancient trash dump in Egypt, the side of the highway in California, and in the blood of 16 million men in Central Asia.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Laughter Amanda Aronczyk, JoAnne Bachorowski, Dr. Jaak Panksepp

    56:57

    Radiolab - Laughter [Amanda Aronczyk, JoAnne Bachorowski, Dr. Jaak Panksepp, Dr. Robert Provine, Barry Sanders and Tyler Stillman]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We all laugh. This hour of Radiolab asks why.

    If you look closely, you'll find that humor has very little to do with it. We ask what makes us laugh, and how it affects us. Along the way, we tickle some rats, listen in on a baby's first laugh, talk to a group of professional laughers, and travel to Tanzania to investigate an outbreak of contagious laughter.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Bigger Than Bacon Nancy Knowlton, Todd Mainprize, Dave Stein and Michel Versluis

    36:59

    Radiolab - Bigger Than Bacon [Nancy Knowlton, Todd Mainprize, Dave Stein and Michel Versluis]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Today's story is a mystery, shockingly hot, and vanishingly tiny.

    It starts with a sound, rising like a mist from the marsh, around a dock in South Carolina. But where it goes next - from submarines to superheroes (and yes, Keanu Reeves!); from the surface of the sun to the middle of the brain - is far from expected. Producer Molly Webster brings her family along for the ride. Enjoy the adventure, before it...implodes.

    Produced by Molly Webster and Annie McEwen. Reported by Molly Webster. Guest sound designer, Jeremy Bloom.

    Special thanks to Kullervo Hynynen, James Bird, and Lawrence Crum.

    After you listen to the episode (spoiler alerts):

    Wanna see the shrimp bubble in super slowmo? Check it out here (and note, of the 1,400 views on this video, producer Molly Webster probably comprises 752).

    If you want to see cavitation bubbles form, and think you might enjoy watching it happen in French, check this out - the high frame rate makes these shots divine.

    Bigger Better Bubbles

    Before Dave Stein, soap bubbles were round, smallish, and collapsed with a pop. Now, they are anything but.

    Today we explore the story of one man, who - in an instant, changed the art of bubble blowing and what it means to be a bubble forever.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Animal Minds Patrick Hof, Alexandra Horowitz, Jonah Lehrer, Paul Nicklen, Paul Theroux

    57:17

    Radiolab - Animal Minds [Patrick Hof, Alexandra Horowitz, Jonah Lehrer, Paul Nicklen, Paul Theroux and Clive Wynne]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In this hour of Radiolab, stories of cross-species communication.

    When we gaze into the eyes of a wild animal, or even a beloved pet, can we ever really know what they might be thinking? Is it naive to assume they're experiencing something close to human emotions? Or is it ridiculous to assume that they AREN'T feeling something like that? We get the story of a rescued whale that may have found a way to say thanks, ask whether dogs feel guilt, and wonder if a successful predator may have fallen in love with a photographer.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • x
  • desc

    Radiolab - Mortality Reporter Jocelyn Ford, Leonard Hayflick, Dr. Cynthia Kenyon and Lu Olkowski

    56:14

    Radiolab - Mortality [Reporter Jocelyn Ford, Leonard Hayflick, Dr. Cynthia Kenyon and Lu Olkowski]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hour of Radiolab: is death a disease that can be cured?

    We filter the modern search for the fountain of youth through personal stories of witnessing death -- the death of a cell, the death of a loved one...and the aging of a society.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Choice John Bargh, Antoine Bechara, Malcolm Gladwell, Steven Johnson, Jonah Lehrer

    56:35

    Radiolab - Choice [John Bargh, Antoine Bechara, Malcolm Gladwell, Steven Johnson, Jonah Lehrer, Gary Loveman,, Mike Pesca, Dr. Oliver Sacks, Barry Schwartz, Baba Shiv and Lawrence Williams]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Logic and emotion aren't the only forces that guide our decisions. This hour of Radiolab, we turn up the volume on the voices in our heads, and try to make sense of the babble. Forget free will, some important decisions could come down to a steaming cup of coffee.



    UPDATE: The Williams & Bargh Yale coffee study Experiencing Physical Warmth Promotes Interpersonal Warmth was replicated in 2014 by researchers at three different universities, Kenyon College, Michigan State University, and University of Manchester. They did not observe the same results as in the original study. They conclude that the difference between the original and the replications may have been due to some issues with the methods of the original study (The effect observed by Williams and Bargh may have been due, in part, to unconscious cues given by the researcher) or may simply have been due to chance. They are very careful in their language to not discredit the original study but they advise that future researchers be more cautious when considering whether exposure to hot or cold temperatures impacts prosocial behavior. In sum: the original Yale study mostly still stands, but researchers now look the methods and results with slight skepticism (not outright disbelief though)
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Where Am I? Dr. Jonathan Cole, Dr. Antonio Damasio, Col. Dan Fulgham, Dr.Ramachandran

    57:52

    Radiolab - Where Am I? [Dr. Jonathan Cole, Dr. Antonio Damasio, Col. Dan Fulgham, Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Dr. Robert Sapolsky, Tim Sestak, Ian Waterman and Dr. James Whinnery]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    OK. Maybe you're in your desk chair. You're in your office. You're in New York, or Detroit, or Timbuktu. You're on planet Earth. But where are you, really? This hour, Radiolab tries to find out.
    How does your brain keep track of your body? We examine the bond between brain and body, and look at what happens when it breaks. First, author and neurologist Oliver Sacks tries to find himself using magnets. Then, a century-old mystery: why do many amputees still feel their missing limbs? We speak with a neuroscientist who solved the problem with an optical illusion. Up next, the story of a butcher who suddenly lost his entire sense of touch. And we hear from pilots who lose consciousness and suffer out-of-body experiences while flying fighter jets.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - The Wright Brothers

    10:01

    Radiolab - The Wright Brothers
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    104 years ago this week, Wilbur and Orville Wright managed to coax their spruce biplane off the North Carolina sand for twelve seconds, and those twelve seconds started a revolution in flight. We examine the human desire to fly, and how getting flight changed us.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Our Podcast comes in all shapes and sizes Sherre DeLys

    8:24

    Radiolab - Our Podcast comes in all shapes and sizes [Sherre DeLys]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jad plays one of his favorite pieces of all time, 'IF' by Sherre DeLys.

    We've been getting some emails from some of you who are confused about the varying lengths of our podcasts: some are long, some are short. Fear not! There's nothing wrong with your download. That's the way it should be. Sometimes we podcast an entire hour-long episode. Sometimes we podcast a shorter piece that may only be 8 minutes or so. That's just how we roll.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Colors Thomas Cronin, Jules Davidoff, Guy Deutscher, Victoria Finlay, James Gleick...

    1:5:52

    Radiolab - Colors [Thomas Cronin, Jules Davidoff, Guy Deutscher, Victoria Finlay, James Gleick, Jonah Lehrer, Jay Neitz]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Our world is saturated in color, from soft hues to violent stains. How does something so intangible pack such a visceral punch? This hour, in the name of science and poetry, Jad and Robert tear the rainbow to pieces.
    To what extent is color a physical thing in the physical world, and to what extent is it created in our minds? We start with Sir Isaac Newton, who was so eager to solve this very mystery, he stuck a knife in his eye to pinpoint the answer. Then, we meet a sea creature that sees a rainbow way beyond anything humans can experience, and we track down a woman who we're pretty sure can see thousands (maybe even millions) more colors than the rest of us. And we end with an age-old question, that, it turns out, never even occurred to most humans until very recently: why is the sky blue?
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - ≤ kg Patrick Abbott, Cyrille Foasso, Andrew Marantz, Latif Nasser and Jon Pratt

    21:02

    Radiolab - ≤ kg [Patrick Abbott, Cyrille Foasso, Andrew Marantz, Latif Nasser and Jon Pratt]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A plum-sized lump of metal takes us from the French Revolution to an underground bunker in Maryland as we try to weigh the way we weigh the world around us.
    In this short, we meet a very special cylinder. It's the gold standard (or, in this case, the platinum-iridium standard) for measuring mass. For decades it's been coddled and cared for and treated like a tiny king. But, as we learn from writer Andrew Marantz, things change—even things that were specifically designed to stay the same.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Rodney Versus Death Amy Gilbert,Tim Howard,Monica Murphy,Dr.Sergio Recuenco,Bill Wasik

    30:10

    Radiolab - Rodney Versus Death [ Dr. Amy Gilbert, Tim Howard, Monica Murphy, Dr. Sergio Recuenco, Bill Wasik and Dr. Rodney Willoughby]
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    What do you do in the face of a monstrous disease with a 100% fatality rate? In this short, a Milwaukee doctor tries to knock death incarnate off its throne.

    In the fall of 2004, Jeanna Giese checked into the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin with a set of puzzling symptoms ... and her condition was deteriorating fast. By the time Dr. Rodney Willoughby saw her, he only knew one thing for sure: if Jeanna's disturbing breakdown turned out to be rabies, she was doomed to die.

    What happened next seemed like a medical impossibility. Producer Tim Howard tells Jeanna's story and talks to authors Monica Murphy and Bill Wasik, and scientists Amy Gilbert and Sergio Recuenco, while trying to unravel the mystery of an unusual patient, and a doctor who dared to take on certain death.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    RadioLab Symmetry

    24:12

    This is an edited version of NPR's RadioLab: Desperately Seeking Symmetry. The original is over an hour long and I don't have that much time to share the entire recording with my class. So, I've cut it down to a little over 24 minutes. I've added images to go along with the story. If this edited version interests you I strongly recommend listening to the entire show which can be found at

    Hope you enjoy this as much as I have.

    Thanks.

    This hour of Radiolab, Jad and Robert set out in search of order and balance in the world around us, and ask how symmetry shapes our very existence -- from the origins of the universe, to what we see when we look in the mirror.

    Along the way, we look for love in ancient Greece, head to modern-day Princeton to peer inside our brains, and turn up an unlikely headline from the Oval Office circa 1979.

  • desc

    Radiolab - Race Ali Abbas, Dr. Jay Cohn, Richard Cooper, Troy Duster, Tony Frudakis

    56:23

    Radiolab - Race [Ali Abbas, Dr. Jay Cohn, Richard Cooper, Troy Duster, Tony Frudakis, Malcolm Gladwell, Nell Greenfieldboyce, Wayne Joseph and David Sherrin]
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This hour of Radiolab, a look at race.
    When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that The concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis. Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - This is Your Brain On Love

    22:54

    Radiolab - This is Your Brain On Love
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Radiolab is given the charge to put on a Singles Night. That's right. 'Jad,' they said, 'stand on a stage and make strangers fall in love! Or, at least, you know, exchange a few phone numbers with each other.' So obviously, we turned to science. Jad consults a few experts on the chemistry of a 'brain on love.'
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Life Brian Baynes, George Church, Nigel Goldenfeld, Karen Keegan

    56:05

    Radiolab - (So-Called) Life [Brian Baynes, George Church, Nigel Goldenfeld, Karen Keegan, Laurel Kendall, Steven Payne, Reshma Shetty, Lee Silver, Steve Strogatz and Lynne Uhl]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In a world where biology and engineering intersect, how do you decide what's natural?

    Biotechnology is making it easier and easier to create new forms of life, but what are the consequences when humans play with life? We travel back to the first billion years of life on Earth, take a look at how modern engineers tinker with living things, and meet a woman who could have been two people.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Limits Patrick Autissier, Daniel Coyle, Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Wendy Ingraham

    59:28

    Radiolab - Limits [Patrick Autissier, Daniel Coyle, Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, Wendy Ingraham, David Jones, Jonah Lehrer, Dr. Hod Lipson, Julie Moss, Jure Robic, Michael Schmidt, Steve Strogatz, Gurol Suel and Ron White]
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On this hour of Radiolab: a journey to the edge of human limits.

    How much can you jam into a human brain? How far can you push yourself past feelings of exhaustion? We test physical endurance with a bike race that makes the Tour de France look like child’s play, and mental capacity with a mind-stretching memory competition. And we ask if robots--for better or worse--may be forging beyond the limits of human understanding.
    Correction: An earlier version of this piece stated in error that Mr. S. remembered what his editor had assigned all the reporters at the newspaper. In A.R. Luria’s book, there is mention only of Mr. S. remembering his own assignments. We also inaccurately stated the rate at which Mr. S. could recall numbers. The actual rate was 50 numbers in 2.5-3 minutes. We also incorrectly stated that Mr. S. memorized Dante's “Inferno.” In fact, Mr. S. memorized only the first several stanzas. In addition, we depicted details of Mr. S.’s mnemonic performances without making clear that they were based in part on supposition. The audio has been adjusted to correct these facts and clarify our suppositions.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - David and the Wire David Weinberg

    28:49

    Radiolab - David and the Wire [David Weinberg]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    David Weinberg was stuck. He had been kicked out of college, was cleaning toilets by day, delivering pizzas by night and spending his weekends in jail. Then one night he heard a story on the radio and got it in his head that maybe he too could make a great radio story. He’d cast himself as the main character in a great documentary and he’d travel and live and steer his way out of his rut.

    So he bought a recorder and began to secretly record every last meaningful and mundane minute of his life and he found his great idea transformed into a troubling obsession. The very thing that gave him hope and purpose was also distancing him from those he loved the most. What if he’d created an archive of his life that had become his life?
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Buttons Not Buttons Radiolab Podcast Articles

    27:01

    Radiolab - Buttons Not Buttons [Radiolab Podcast Articles]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Buttons are usually small and unimportant. But not always. Sometimes they are a portal to power, freedom, and destruction. Today we thread together tales of taking charge of the little things in life, of fortunes made and lost, and of the ease with which the world can end.

    Confused? Push the button marked Play.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Jad and Robert: The Early Years

    19:15

    Radiolab - Jad and Robert: The Early Years
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ever wonder how Jad and Robert met?

    Well it all began with an everyday encounter where they discovered they both went to the same small liberal arts college in Ohio. For this week's podcast, the guys go on stage at Oberlin College to tell the tale of their meeting and how they started tinkering around with tape to come up with the Radiolab you know today.

    Vintage Radiolab alert! You'll hear the very first piece Jad and Robert made together. It's an audio-experiment called 'Flag Day' that they submitted to This American Life. TAL's Ira Glass and Julie Snyder phone in to share what they thought of it.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Yellow Fluff and Other Curious Encounters Erica Carmel, Jerry Coyne, Paul Davies

    57:58

    Radiolab - Yellow Fluff and Other Curious Encounters [Erica Carmel, Jerry Coyne, Paul Davies, Tom Eisner, Alan Lightman, Erica Lloyd, Rob Reves-Sohn, Sarah Rogerson, Dr. Oliver Sacks and Steve Strogatz]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The quest for scientific knowledge is one of the great and noble pursuits of humankind. It's also one of the most dangerous, frustrating, ego-driven, transcendent, dirty, sublime, tedious, demoralizing, inspiring...you get the idea. This hour, stories of love and loss in the name of science.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Zoos Nell Boyce, Reporter Jocelyn Ford, Elizabeth Gould, David Hancocks

    56:26

    Radiolab - Zoos [Nell Boyce, Reporter Jocelyn Ford, Elizabeth Gould, David Hancocks, Grant Jones, Fernando Nottebohm, Dr. Alan Rabinowitz and Violet Sunde]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In a cruel trick of evolution, humans can stand just three feet from a ferocious animal and still be perfectly safe. This hour, Radiolab goes to the zoo.

    What's with our need to get close to wildness? We examine where we stand in this paradox--starting with the Romans, and ending in the wilds of Belize, staring into the eyes of a wild jaguar.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Tell Me A Story Robert Krulwich

    26:14

    Radiolab - Tell Me A Story [Robert Krulwich]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Robert Krulwich's commencement speech at California Institute of Technology gets at the heart of what we do here at Radiolab.

    It's a treat to hear his passion. We enjoyed it. And we thought you might too.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Speed Mike Beller, Joshua Foer, Seth Horowitz, Eric Hunsader, John Mainstone...

    59:41

    Radiolab - Speed [Mike Beller, Joshua Foer, Seth Horowitz, Eric Hunsader, John Mainstone...]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We live our lives at human speed, we experience and interact with the world on a human time scale. But this hour, we put ourselves through the paces, peek inside a microsecond, and master the fastest thing in the universe
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Falling Joan Murray, David Quammen, Garrett Soden and Neil deGrasse Tyson

    56:32

    Radiolab - Falling [Joan Murray, David Quammen, Garrett Soden and Neil deGrasse Tyson]
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    There are so many ways to fall—in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls.

    We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - The Political Thicket Suzie Lechtenberg

    42:41

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - The Political Thicket [Suzie Lechtenberg]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This story comes from Radiolab's first ever spin-off podcast, More Perfect. To hear more, subscribe here:

    When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history — cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case.

    On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Stranger in Paradise Procyon minor

    42:52

    Radiolab - Stranger in Paradise [Procyon minor]
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Back in 1911, a box with a dead raccoon in it showed up in Washington D.C., at the office of Gerrit S. Miller. After pulling it out and inspecting it, he realized this raccoon was from the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, and unlike anything he’d ever seen before. He christened it Procyon minor and in doing so changed the history of Guadeloupe forever.
    Today we travel from the storage rooms of the Smithsonian to the sandy beaches of Guadeloupe, chasing the tale of this trash can tipping critter. All the while trying to uncover what it means to be special.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    REMOVING A TRAPPED EARRING BACK | Dr. Paul

    3:30

    AUTHOR OF THE AMAZON BESTSELLER, The Vaccine-Friendly Plan. On sale wherever books are sold. Read an excerpt:

    MY WEBSITE:

    Please SHARE, LIKE, COMMENT, and even FAVORITE THIS VIDEO if you found it useful or if you know somebody who it may benefit. Thank you.


    FACEBOOK:

    MY BLOG:

    TWITTER:

    WEB SITE:

    Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (
    Source:
    Artist:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Escape! Edward Dolnick, Ann Druyan, Phil Lapsley, Ben Montgomery and Merav Opher

    1:6:33

    Radiolab - Escape! [Edward Dolnick, Ann Druyan, Phil Lapsley, Ben Montgomery and Merav Opher]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The walls are closing in, you've got no way out... and then, suddenly, you escape! This hour, stories about traps, getaways, perpetual cycles, and staggering breakthroughs.
    We kick things off with a true escape artist--a man who’s broken out of jail more times than anyone alive. We try to figure out why he keeps running... and whether he will ever stop. Then, the ingeniously simple question that led Isaac Newton to an enormous intellectual breakthrough: why doesn’t the moon fall out of the sky? In the wake of Newton's new idea, we find ourselves in a strange space at the edge of the solar system, about to cross a boundary beyond which we know nothing. Finally, we hear the story of a blind kid who freed himself from an unhappy childhood by climbing into the telephone system, and bending it to his will.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Diagnosis Dr. Teri Brentnall, Dr. Mary Bronner, Emanuel Frowner, Cynthia Fu

    56:02

    Radiolab - Diagnosis [Dr. Teri Brentnall, Dr. Mary Bronner, Emanuel Frowner, Cynthia Fu, Louis Garcia, Eric Kandel, Lu Olkowski, Dr. Robert Sapolsky and Gregory Warner]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Humans love to solve problems. In this hour of Radiolab, diagnosis--our attempt to find out what's wrong, and give it a label.

    In this day and age, we have astonishing technology--chemicals and computers and machines that can pinpoint things imperceptible to our senses. But humans aren't obsolete--intuition and creativity still lead the way both in discovering the nature of the problem, and in dealing with that knowledge.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - The Ring and I Howard Shore, Playwrite Tony Kushner, Joe Clark, Alex Ross

    58:59

    Radiolab - The Ring and I [Howard Shore, Playwrite Tony Kushner, Joe Clark, Alex Ross, Laurie Layton Shapira, Speight Jenkins, Gary Lucas, Fred Plotkin, Will Berger, John Rockwell]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On this Radiolab/WNYC Special, we explore the impact and influence of Wagner's Ring Cycle on the Metropolitan Opera's 2004 Presentation.

    It might seem hyperbole to claim, as many Wagnerites do, that The Ring Cycle is 'The Greatest Work of Art Ever.' But the grandeur and power of this monumental work have permeated our culture from Star Wars to Bugs Bunny to J.R.R. Tolkien.
    This piece includes the voices of Howard Shore, Oscar-winning composer of The Lord of the Rings, Playwrite Tony Kushner, Joe Clark, technical director for the Metropolitan Opera, Alex Ross, music critic of The New Yorker magazine, Jungian Psychologist Laurie Layton Shapira, Seattle Opera director Speight Jenkins, Guitarist Gary Lucas, Fred Plotkin, Food & Opera Writer; Will Berger, author of Wagner without Fear, and John Rockwell, cultural correspondent for The New York Times.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Musical Language David Cope, Diana Deutsch, Anne Fernald and Jonah Lehrer

    58:29

    Radiolab - Musical Language [David Cope, Diana Deutsch, Anne Fernald and Jonah Lehrer]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In this hour of Radiolab, we examine the line between language and music.
    What is music? Why does it move us? How does the brain process sound, and why are some people better at it than others?

    We re-imagine the disastrous debut of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring in 1913 through the lens of modern neurology, and we meet a composer who uses computers to capture the musical DNA of dead composers in order to create new work.



    Correction: An earlier version of this piece incorrectly stated the dates of two performances of “Rite of Spring” and the time that passed between them. The performance that inspired rioting occurred on May 29th, 1913. The second performance that we discussed occurred in April of 1914. The audio has been adjusted to reflect this fact.

    Correction: An earlier version of this piece incorrectly stated that the “Rite of Spring” was used in the movie “Fantasia” during the part that featured mushrooms. It was in fact used during the part that featured dinosaurs. The audio has been adjusted to reflect this fact.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Sperm Tim Birkhead, Matthew Cobb, Ari Daniel, Joanna Ellington, Nell Greenfieldboyce

    57:02

    Radiolab - Sperm [Tim Birkhead, Matthew Cobb, Ari Daniel, Joanna Ellington, Nell Greenfieldboyce, Steve Jones and Kathleen LaBounty]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sperm carry half the genes needed for human life. In this hour of Radiolab, some basic questions and profound thoughts about reproduction.

    To begin: why so many sperm? We turn to the animal kingdom for answers, which lands us on a tour of sperm battles in ducks, flying pig sperm, and promiscuous whippoorwills. Next, we ponder fatherhood, and wonder...in a world where sperm can be frozen and kept for all eternity...what the future holds for men. We end quietly, in a stark sonic space with a widow struggling to keep some essence of her husband alive.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Radiolab Live: Tell-Tale Hearts featuring Oliver Sacks

    54:32

    Radiolab - Radiolab Live: Tell-Tale Hearts featuring Oliver Sacks
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A few days ago Radiolab performed a live show and this episode we're bringing you a few of the highlights. They were stories of what motivates us, our drives, our loves and losses. Producer Molly Webster tells us the story of life, near-death and what happens when your heart starts to work against you. And we visit with Dr. Oliver Sacks one last time to reflect on his life, his loves and his endless sense of wonder.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Null and Void Produced by Matt Kielty and Tracie Hunte

    50:21

    Radiolab - Null and Void [Produced by Matt Kielty and Tracie Hunte]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Today, a hidden power that is either the cornerstone of our democracy or a trapdoor to anarchy.

    Should a juror be able to ignore the law? From a Quaker prayer meeting in the streets of London, to riots in the streets of LA, we trace the history of a quiet act of rebellion and struggle with how much power “we the people” should really have.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Emergence Elizabeth Buck, John Buck, Debra Gordon, Stephen Johnson

    57:06

    Radiolab - Emergence [Elizabeth Buck, John Buck, Debra Gordon, Stephen Johnson]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    What happens when there is no leader? Starlings, bees, and ants manage just fine. In fact, they form staggeringly complicated societies -- all without a Toscanini to conduct them into harmony. This hour of Radiolab, we ask how this happens.
    We gaze down at the bottom-up logic of cities, Google, and even our very own brains with fire-flyologists, ant experts, neurologists, a mathematician, and an economist.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Bliss Aleksander Gamme, Roland Griffiths, Dr. Kenneth Libbrecht and Arika Okrent

    1:13:08

    Radiolab - Bliss [Aleksander Gamme, Roland Griffiths, Dr. Kenneth Libbrecht and Arika Okrent]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Moments of total, world-shaking bliss are not easy to come by. Maybe that's what makes them feel so life-altering when they strike. And so worth chasing. This hour: stories of striving, grasping, tripping, and falling for happiness, perfection, and ideals.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Making Radiolab Walter Murch

    33:35

    Radiolab - Making Radiolab [Walter Murch]
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In spring of 2006, Jad and Robert took the stage at the SoHo Apple Store to talk about the making of Radiolab. Jad geeks out on the nitty-gritty of digital sound editing, and Robert discusses the editorial questions raised in creating imaginative soundscapes. And film editor Walter Murch weighs in on the components of storytelling.
    Correction: An earlier version of this short incorrectly stated that Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” premiered in 1938. In fact, it premiered in 1913. The audio has been adjusted to reflect this fact.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

  • desc

    Radiolab - Inheritance Lars Olov Bygren, Frances Champagne,Barbara Harris,Destiny Harris,Sam Kean

    1:3:32

    Radiolab - Inheritance [Lars Olov Bygren, Frances Champagne, Barbara Harris, Destiny Harris, Sam Kean, Michael Meaney, Carl Zimmer]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Once a kid is born, their genetic fate is pretty much sealed. Or is it? This hour, we put nature and nurture on a collision course and discover how outside forces can find a way inside us, shaping not just our hearts and minds, but the basic biological blueprint that we pass on to future generations.
    Google plus:
    Subscriber:
    twitter:
    Blogger:
    Reddit:
    Tumblr:
    Pinterest:

Share Playlist





Advertisements