Radiolab Podcast

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    Radiolab - Fetal Consequences a too dangerously beautiful idea?

    18:19

    Radiolab - Fetal Consequences [a too dangerously beautiful idea?]
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    Mother's day is nigh. Sort of. Anyway, without knowing it, you might have already given your mom a pretty lasting gift. But whether it helps or hurts her, or both, is still an open question. In this Radiolab short, Robert updates us on the science of fetal cells -- one of the first topics he covered as an NPR science correspondent.

    Six years ago, wearing his NPR science-correspondent hat, Robert presented listeners with this question: what if we told you that legions of fetal cells hang out inside a mother for decades after she gives birth -- and might even help heal her when she's sick or hurt? Back then he described this as a too dangerously beautiful idea for the scientists researching fetal cells. They wanted to believe it, but the evidence wasn't there yet. One of those scientists was Kirby Johnson at Tufts University, who explained that the cells might also hurt the mother. He wasn't sure which. I think that that's something that we're going to see within the next five years or less, Kirby said. So, Robert thought it was high-time to call Kirby for an update, and to ask once again about Kirby's personal stake in the work he's doing.
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    Radiolab - Patient Zero - Updated Nolan Smith, Nathan Wolfe and Carl Zimmer...

    1:9:35

    Radiolab - Patient Zero - Updated [Nolan Smith, Nathan Wolfe and Carl Zimmer...]
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    The greatest mysteries have a shadowy figure at the center—someone who sets things in motion and holds the key to how the story unfolds—Patient Zero. This hour, Radiolab hunts for Patient Zeroes of all kinds and considers the course of an ongoing outbreak.

    We start with the story of perhaps the most iconic Patient Zero of all time: Typhoid Mary. Then, we dive into a molecular detective story to pinpoint the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, and we re-imagine the moment the virus that caused the global pandemic sprang to life. After that, we update the show with a quick look at the very current Ebola outbreak in west Africa. In the end, we're left wondering if you can trace the spread of an idea the way you can trace the spread of a disease and find ourselves faced with competing claims about the origin of the high five.
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    Radiolab: Dinopocalypse!

    51:13

    The startling specifics of how dinosaurs were wiped off the planet.

    More from Radiolab at

    From Radiolab's stage show Apocalyptical, recorded live in Seattle.

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    Radiolab - Colors Thomas Cronin, Jules Davidoff, Guy Deutscher, Victoria Finlay, James Gleick...

    1:5:52

    Radiolab - Colors [Thomas Cronin, Jules Davidoff, Guy Deutscher, Victoria Finlay, James Gleick, Jonah Lehrer, Jay Neitz]
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    Our world is saturated in color, from soft hues to violent stains. How does something so intangible pack such a visceral punch? This hour, in the name of science and poetry, Jad and Robert tear the rainbow to pieces.
    To what extent is color a physical thing in the physical world, and to what extent is it created in our minds? We start with Sir Isaac Newton, who was so eager to solve this very mystery, he stuck a knife in his eye to pinpoint the answer. Then, we meet a sea creature that sees a rainbow way beyond anything humans can experience, and we track down a woman who we're pretty sure can see thousands (maybe even millions) more colors than the rest of us. And we end with an age-old question, that, it turns out, never even occurred to most humans until very recently: why is the sky blue?
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    RadioLab Symmetry

    24:12

    This is an edited version of NPR's RadioLab: Desperately Seeking Symmetry. The original is over an hour long and I don't have that much time to share the entire recording with my class. So, I've cut it down to a little over 24 minutes. I've added images to go along with the story. If this edited version interests you I strongly recommend listening to the entire show which can be found at

    Hope you enjoy this as much as I have.

    Thanks.

    This hour of Radiolab, Jad and Robert set out in search of order and balance in the world around us, and ask how symmetry shapes our very existence -- from the origins of the universe, to what we see when we look in the mirror.

    Along the way, we look for love in ancient Greece, head to modern-day Princeton to peer inside our brains, and turn up an unlikely headline from the Oval Office circa 1979.

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    Jad Abumrad: Radiolab | Talks at Google

    1:2:56

    Get behind the scenes insight into WNYC's Radiolab podcast. WNYC's Radiolab is a show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and human experience. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show attempts to approach broad, difficult topics such as time and morality in an accessible and light-hearted manner and with a distinctive audio production style.

    Since 2005, Abumrad has produced and co-hosted the nationally syndicated program. Abumrad was named a 2011 MacArthur Fellow. Jad Abumrad joins us fresh off his sabbatical to tell us all about how their beloved show gets made.

    Listen to the podcast here:

    Event moderated by Carrie Battan.

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    RadioLab, Light @ human speed

    12:31

    Fascinating Podcast.
    Speed of natural phenomena.
    Speed and distance.
    Speed of sound.
    Speed of light.

    This is an excerpt...
    light @ human speed...

    Lene has accomplished
    the impossible...
    captured 'light'...
    Slowed 'light' down..

    Listen...
    Be dumbstruck...

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    Joe Rogan Experience #530 - Vince & Emily Horn, from Buddhist Geeks

    2:50:12

    Buddhist Geeks is a podcast, on-line magazine and annual conference with a primary focus on American Buddhism.

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    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - The Political Thicket Suzie Lechtenberg

    42:41

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: More Perfect - The Political Thicket [Suzie Lechtenberg]
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    This story comes from Radiolab's first ever spin-off podcast, More Perfect. To hear more, subscribe here:

    When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history — cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case.

    On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever.
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    Radiolab from WNYC 9 Volt Nirvana

    38:24

    Radiolab from WNYC --- 9-Volt Nirvana Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 03:17 PM Learn a new language faster than ever! Leave doubt in the dust! Be a better sniper! .

    Radiolab from WNYC --- 9-Volt Nirvana Thursday, June 26, 2014 - 03:17 PM Learn a new language faster than ever! Leave doubt in the dust! Be a better sniper! .

    Would you experiment with your brain? Perhaps there's a Dr. Frankenstein in us all. Introducing Victoria | Frankenstein, MD - Episode 1

    Radiolab Black Box This hour, we examine three very different kinds of black boxes—those peculiar spaces where it's clear what's going in, we know what's com.

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    Radiolab - Its Not Us, Its You

    56:41

    Radiolab - It's Not Us, It's You
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    It’s the end of the year, and the entire Radiolab team is starting to take stock and come up for air. We're excited about how much ground we've covered - stories about college debaters and figure skaters, meat allergies and salmon-eating trees, deathwatch beetles mating and Kpop stars dating - we're excited for what 2017 holds, and grateful because you have made all these things possible with your support.
    But before 2016 comes to an end, we wanted to do something a little different. We wanted to swivel our attention back to you, our listeners, reconnect with some old friends to see how they are doing, and thank everyone for what they've shared with us.
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    The Myth of American Social Mobility

    16:27

    From WNYC's 'On The Media' podcast, presented by Brooke Gladstone, as featured in the Radiolab podcast.

    Links:



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    1949 war of the worlds broadcast in quito ecuador radiolab podcast season 4 episode 3

    14:14

    Radiolab podcast on Nov 1st 2014, s4 e3
    Quito, Ecuador excerpt only
    starting at 30 mins in

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    Radiolab: Musical Language

    11:07

    Blog Stravinsky Radiolab

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    Radiolab - Update: CRISPR Jennifer Doudna, Kevin Esvelt, Eugene V. Koonin,Beth Shapiro,Carl Zimmer

    48:59

    Radiolab - Update: CRISPR [Jennifer Doudna, Kevin Esvelt, Eugene V. Koonin, Beth Shapiro and Carl Zimmer]
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    It's been almost two years since we learned about CRISPR, a ninja-assassin-meets-DNA-editing-tool that has been billed as one of the most powerful, and potentially controversial, technologies ever discovered by scientists. In this episode, we catch up on what's been happening (it's a lot), and learn about CRISPR's potential to not only change human evolution, but every organism on the entire planet.

    Out drinking with a few biologists, Jad finds out about something called CRISPR. No, it’s not a robot or the latest dating app, it’s a method for genetic manipulation that is rewriting the way we change DNA. Scientists say they’ll someday be able to use CRISPR to fight cancer and maybe even bring animals back from the dead. Or, pretty much do whatever you want. Jad and Robert delve into how CRISPR does what it does, and consider whether we should be worried about a future full of flying pigs, or the simple fact that scientists have now used CRISPR to tweak the genes of human embryos.
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    Radiolab - Creation of the periodic table

    4:44

    Something different. Dedication to Dr. Oliver Sacks.

    I do not own the audio, it belongs to Radiolab, WNYC, NPR.

    You can listen to the whole podcast here

    Other podcasts

    Like, share, subscribe! It helps me a lot!

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    High Frequency Trading - Rabiolab

    21:57

    A really interesting segment from the radio podcast Rabiolab. the Episode is titled 'speed' and this particular segment looks into the world of the stock exchange. In particular a practice that has recently become popular called High Frequency Trading. This is the same phenomenon that was blamed for the 2010 Flash Crash in which the market had the largest dip in decades. If you like this segment go to and donate to this amazing podcast.

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    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: Invisibilia

    31:43

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: Invisibilia
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    Producers' Note: A correction has been made to this audio to reflect the wishes of the subject of this story, Paige Abendroth. NPR's Invisibilia's originally included Paige's birth name in this piece due to a miscommunication between Invisibilia's reporter, Alix Spiegel and Paige. We have not been in contact with Paige directly, but NPR has issued the following statement from Anne Gudenkauf, senior supervising editor of NPR's science desk: We would never have violated Paige’s wishes in this story; it’s an unfortunate misunderstanding. Invisibilia's upcoming episode on Paige will be edited to remove references to the name she no longer recognizes. Also the upcoming episode, which focuses on how categories affect us all, will explore in more depth the changes in Paige's life over the two years that she and Alix have spoken and will do that, as always, with attention to bi-gender and transgender reporting guidelines.
    Former Radiolab producer Lulu Miller and NPR reporter Alix Spiegel come to the studio to give us a sneak peak of their new show, Invisibilia.
    Invisibilia has an upcoming episode about categories, so Alix tells us a story about two very basic categories: boy and girl. We've heard lots of stories about the sometimes blurry boundaries between boy and girl, but Alix introduces us to someone who experiences those categories in a way that was totally, completely new to us.
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    Invasion of the Pod People: Radiolab, Risk and Genius: Jad Abumrad and Andrew Denton

    1:7:43

    'There's no room for serendipity in podcasting for people who don't agree with you. Unless you're one of those people who seeks out disagreement; those people are rare.'

    Radiolab is one of the world’s most popular podcasts. Admired for its gentle explorations of big questions, the show – which was collecting listeners in their millions long before podcasting arrived at the mainstream’s door – has won many significant awards. Abumrad himself has been awarded a prestigious MacArthur Genius Grant, and his incredibly labour-intensive sound designs complement killer editorial instincts and an elegant, accessible sense of curiosity.

    In Melbourne for the first time, Abumrad chats with veteran broadcaster Andrew Denton. Perhaps best known for his landmark interview show Enough Rope, Denton’s first podcast, Better Off Dead – produced in partnership with the Wheeler Centre – topped Australia’s iTunes chart, drew widespread acclaim and stirred passionate public debate about voluntary assisted dying in this country.

    Hear from one of the world’s foremost storytellers about creative discomfort, Australian inspiration, the music of language, the challenges now facing podcasters and communicators, and the hot, curious power of the uncertain.

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    Radiolab - Blame Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich

    1:3:43

    Radiolab - Blame [Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich]
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    We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?
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    Radiolab - Shorts: The Distance of the Moon Italo Calvino and Liev Schreiber

    39:34

    Radiolab - Shorts: The Distance of the Moon [Italo Calvino and Liev Schreiber]
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    What if the moon were just a jump away? In this short, a beautiful answer to that question from Italo Calvino, read live by Liev Schreiber.

    According to one theory, the moon formed when a Mars-sized chunk of rock collided with Earth. After the moon coalesced out of the debris from that impact, it was much closer to Earth than it is today. This idea is taken to it's fanciful limit in Italo Calvino's story The Distance of the Moon (from his collection Cosmicomics, translated by William Weaver). The story, narrated by a character with the impossible-to-pronounce name Qfwfq, tells of a strange crew who jump between Earth and moon, and sometimes hover in the nether reaches of gravity between the two.
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    A Radiolab Producer on the Making of a Podcast

    27:15

    Kelsey Padgett (Radiolab, More Perfect) takes you on the roller coaster ride that is making a deep-dive audio documentary. What does it take to make a fully realized segment? How many drafts are too many? And why are editors so hard on you? (Spoiler: It’s because they love you.)

    Recorded live at Werk It, a women's podcast festival hosted and produced by WNYC.

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    Radiolab - Nukes Bruce Blair, Tony De Brum, Harold Herring, Sonya McMullen, William Perry

    41:07

    Radiolab - Nukes [Bruce Blair, Tony De Brum, Harold Herring, Sonya McMullen, Secretary of Defense William Perry and Alex Wellerstein]
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    President Richard Nixon once boasted that at any moment he could pick up a telephone and - in 20 minutes - kill 60 million people. Such is the power of the US President over the nation’s nuclear arsenal. But what if you were the military officer on the receiving end of that phone call? Could you refuse the order?

    This episode, we profile one Air Force Major who asked that question back in the 1970s and learn how the very act of asking it was so dangerous it derailed his career. We also pick up the question ourselves and pose it to veterans both high and low on the nuclear chain of command. Their responses reveal once and for all whether there are any legal checks and balances between us and a phone call for Armageddon.
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    Radiolab Live: Apocalyptical FULL SHOW

    2:1:56

    Dinosaurs, death, and destruction -- a thought-provoking and laughter-inducing dance on the grave of our inevitable demise.

    More from Radiolab at

    Cataclysmic destruction. Surprising survival. Radiolab turns its gaze to the topic of endings, both blazingly fast and agonizingly slow, in its live show Apocalyptical. With their signature blend of storytelling, science, and music, hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich romp through hundreds of millions of years of history to arrive at the end, again and again. Comedians Reggie Watts and Kurt Braunohler join the party, while musicians On Fillmore and Noveller create a cinematic live score before your eyes. Recorded live on stage in Seattle.

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    Radiolab - Transcendence

    6:51

    This short film is an auditory and photographic collage of Radiolab's most transcendent moments. Radiolab, which weaves stories and science into sound and music-rich documentaries, has a transcendent power that makes listening an incredible experience. This video, set to Bill Evan's Peace Piece, attempts to encapsulate this emotion and experience. Photography from National Geographic. Enjoy.

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    How trees talk to each other | Suzanne Simard

    18:25

    A forest is much more than what you see, says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
    Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at

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    Radiolab - The Living Room Brendan Baker, Briana Breen and Nick van der Kolk

    23:50

    Radiolab - The Living Room [Brendan Baker, Briana Breen and Nick van der Kolk]
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    We're thrilled to present a piece from one of our favorite podcasts, Love + Radio (Nick van der Kolk and Brendan Baker).

    Producer Briana Breen brings us the story: Diane’s new neighbors across the way never shut their curtains, and that was the beginning of an intimate, but very one-sided relationship.
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    Radio Lab: 23 weeks 6 Days - Premature Birth and NICU

    58:44

    A really interesting talk that takes you inside NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) and discusses the hard ethical decisions that parents and medical professionals are faced with when a baby is born prematurely. Below are links to the brilliant series Kelly wrote for the Tampa Bay Times and the original Radio Lab podcast page which includes a video portrait of the baby's time in NICU.


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    Radiolab - Buttons Not Buttons Radiolab Podcast Articles

    27:01

    Radiolab - Buttons Not Buttons [Radiolab Podcast Articles]
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    Buttons are usually small and unimportant. But not always. Sometimes they are a portal to power, freedom, and destruction. Today we thread together tales of taking charge of the little things in life, of fortunes made and lost, and of the ease with which the world can end.

    Confused? Push the button marked Play.
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    Joe Rogan Experience #770 - Michael Shermer

    2:59:24

    Michael Shermer is a science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, and Editor in Chief of its magazine Skeptic, which is largely devoted to investigating pseudoscientific and supernatural claims.

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    BBC How Plants Communicate & Think - Amazing Nature Documentary

    52:36

    WELCOME to Documentary TV!
    SUBSCRIBE NOW!

    With great new content coming out regularly subscribing will help you keep up to date!

    If you love documentaries about wildlife, space, cars, knowledge, history and much more, this is the channel for you!

    Like and Comment to share your experience with all our viewers!

    and most of all ENJOY!

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    Radiolab - Update: Eye In the Sky Alex Goldmark and Manoush Zomorodi

    35:07

    Radiolab - Update: Eye In the Sky [Alex Goldmark and Manoush Zomorodi]
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    An update on Ross McNutt and his superpower — he can zoom in on everyday life, then rewind and fast-forward to solve crimes in a shutter-flash. But should he?

    In 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see - literally see - who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the Air Force, and brought this technology back home with him. Manoush Zomorodi and Alex Goldmark from the podcast “Note to Self” give us the lowdown on Ross’s unique brand of persistent surveillance, from Juarez, Mexico to Dayton, Ohio. Then, once we realize what we can do, we wonder whether we should.
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    Top 5 Podcasts

    5:15

    1. This American Life/Radiolab
    2. 99% Invisible -
    3. Tim Ferriss Show -
    4. LimeTown -
    5. Serial -

    Honorable Mention
    A. Hello Internet -
    B. Mortified Podcast -

    VLOG 004

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    Radiolab - The Rhino Hunter Corey Knowlton and Richard Leakey

    49:18

    Radiolab - The Rhino Hunter [Corey Knowlton and Richard Leakey]
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    Back in 2014, Corey Knowlton paid $350,000 for a hunting trip to Namibia to shoot and kill an endangered species. He’s a professional hunter, who guides hunts all around the world, so going to Africa would be nothing new. The target on the other hand would be. And so too, he quickly found, would be the attention.

    This episode, producer Simon Adler follows Corey as he dodges death threats and prepares to pull the trigger. Along the way we stop to talk with Namibian hunters and government officials, American activists, and someone who's been here before - Kenya’s former Director of Wildlife, Richard Leakey. All the while, we try to uncover what conservation really means in the 21st century.
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    BLAME; More About The Radiolab Podcast Please See My Comments For More...

    6:32

    If MRI can find out probabilities of some events in our lives before they happen, does society need blame? Is guilt the answer? Here I speak of another method. It's not how high you sail but how high you bounce so goes the proverb. Using MRI not just to diagnose, but also AR to heal would save huge cost to the economy. My comments about the Radiolab podcast of the same Blame name!

    The use of AR in the justice system is only one use, other uses are to reduce conversational distractions, these are estimated to cost the economy 50% of it's money, as in on the job distractions. This may also mean much higher employee comfort ratings, these are now lower than before. And it also may help many areas of the economy, reduced debt by reducing stress, reduce the divorce rates, reduce obesity, improve sleep, reduce drug use, improve military strength (the problem of fitness for soldiers is considered to be a major security risk), reduce the crime rate, and more. Here I speak more of it's use for the justice system, but as you can see it may be of real worth. I call it e.g. a relationship defender as I say on my blog Encyclopedia Computoria. Four years ago it was estimated in three years AR would be in general use in the marm business, in another three or four it may trickle down to the consumer, can't wait, so cool. This isn't like a VCR I once saw in high school for 1500, then 30 more years to wait for a 30$ VCR. AR of this type would use all existing hardware and easy to devise software. Recently only the rich have been able to afford peace and golden silence. The truth abounds in quiet places and I think of it as like having warm feet not a luxury but essential to good health. It does real harm to people living by airports, and studies show when a truck goes by at night your blood pressure goes up three hours even if you're asleep. So reducing noise alone would save 300,000 lives a year.

    See my blog Encyclopedia Computoria for more, thanks!

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    Radiolab Translation

    14:42

    Philosopher Douglas Hofstadter considers what it means to translate something from one language to another -- a new this case a light-hearted poem front 16th century France.

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    Radiolabs Jad Abumrad on Creativity, Failure and The Virtues of Wonder

    1:10:55

    Jad Abumrad is the creator and mind behind WNYC's Radiolab, one of public radio's most popular and innovative programs. We spoke to Jad about his upbringing in Tennessee and early love of music, the beginnings of Radiolab, and discuss the virtues of wonder.

    From his creative doubts, to the importance of failure, a conversation you won't want to miss.

    To subscribe to the Radiowaves podcast and hear more interviews with your favourite voices of radio subscribe to the podcast here: bit.ly/1w0FujQ or head to radiowavesshow.com

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    Radiolab host Jad Abumrad in Studio Q

    30:26


    Jad Abumrad is the co-host of Radiolab, the innovative, popular American public radio program and podcast about science & philosophy. HOW the show spins a tale is as much a part of the appeal as the stories it tells.

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    RadioLab sample Podcast

    5:08

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    RadioLab - The podcast I love... that messed up

    5:17

    RadioLab, mixing science and religion in a toxic way.

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    Robert Krulwich, RadioLab - The Wonder of Storytelling

    15:58

    Robert Krulwich co-hosts RadioLab, a podcast with 4M monthly downloads. He takes us through a journey of how he has mixed science and mystery into his news reporting, covering everything from where music comes from, to differences in flight vs. fight responses between men and women, to the collapse of dinosaur flatulence and the decline in atmospheric methane. An interesting journey indeed.

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    Podcast Advice: 2 Dope Queens & Radiolab collide

    3:09

    Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson host the newest podcast in the WNYC Studios family, 2 Dope Queens. Since this is their first podcast, they go straight to the expert, Jad Abumrad from Radiolab, for some advice.

    Listen to 2 Dope Queens: wnyc.org/2DopeQueens

    Produced by WNYC Studios: wnycstudios.org

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    Radiolabs Blame - season 12, ep 2 - Neurolaw

    16:02

    This is a segment entitled Neurolaw from Radiolab's episode Blame that first aired September 12, 2013. No copyright infringement intended - this is for educational purposes only.

    Full episode available here:
    Radiolab's website:

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    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: Ponzi Supernova Steve Fishman and Ellen Horne

    37:21

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: Ponzi Supernova [Steve Fishman and Ellen Horne]
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    We thought we knew the story of Bernie Madoff. How he masterminded the biggest Ponzi scheme in history, leaving behind scores of distraught investors and a $65 billion black hole.

    But we had never heard the story from Madoff himself.

    This week, reporter Steve Fishman and former Radiolabber Ellen Horne visit our studio to play us snippets from their extraordinary Audible series Ponzi Supernova, which features exclusive footage of the man who bamboozled the world. After years of investigative reporting – including interviews with dozens of FBI and SEC agents, investors, traders, and attorneys – the pair scrutinize Madoff’s account to understand exactly why he did it, how he managed to pull it off, and how culpable he actually was. Was he a puppetmaster or a puppet? And if the latter, who else is to blame for the biggest financial fraud in history?
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    Radiolab Presents More Perfect Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer

    36:17

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    Radiolab - The Buried Bodies Case Frank Armani, Lisa Lerman, Roberta Petz and Jim Tracy

    46:15

    Radiolab - The Buried Bodies Case [Frank Armani, Lisa Lerman, Roberta Petz and Jim Tracy]
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    In 1973, a massive manhunt in New York's Adirondack Mountains ended when police captured a man named Robert Garrow. And that’s when this story really gets started.

    This episode we consider a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his client’s most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the world and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney - how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people?
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    Radiolab - Dark Side of the Earth Dave Wolf

    19:01

    Radiolab - Dark Side of the Earth [Dave Wolf]
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    200 miles above Earth's surface, astronaut Dave Wolf -- rocketing through the blackness of Earth's shadow at 5 miles a second -- floated out of the Mir Space Station on his very first spacewalk. In this short, he describes the extremes of light and dark in space, relives a heart-pounding close call, and shares one of the most tranquil moments of his life.
    When we were putting together our live show In the Dark, Jad and Robert called up Dave Wolf to ask him if he had any stories about darkness. And boy, did he. Dave told us two stories that became the finale of our show.
    Back in late 1997, Dave Wolf was on his first spacewalk, to perform work on the Mir (the photo to the right was taken during that mission, courtesy of NASA.). Dave wasn't alone -- with him was veteran Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Solovyev. (That's a picture of Dave giving Anatoly a hug on board the Mir, also courtesy of NASA).

    Out in blackness of space, the contrast between light and dark is almost unimaginably extreme -- every 45 minutes, you plunge between absolute darkness on the night-side of Earth, and blazing light as the sun screams into view. Dave and Anatoly were tethered to the spacecraft, traveling 5 miles per second. That's 16 times faster than we travel on Earth's surface as it rotates -- so as they orbited, they experienced 16 nights and 16 days for every Earth day.

    Dave's description of his first spacewalk was all we could've asked for, and more. But what happened next ... well, it's just one of those stories that you always hope an astronaut will tell. Dave and Anatoly were ready to call it a job and head back into the Mir when something went wrong with the airlock. They couldn't get it to re-pressurize. In other words, they were locked out. After hours of trying to fix the airlock, they were running out of the resources that kept them alive in their space suits and facing a grisly death. So, they unhooked their tethers, and tried one last desperate move .

    In the end, they made it through, and Dave went on to perform dozens more spacewalks in the years to come, but he never again experienced anything like those harrowing minutes trying to improvise his way back into the Mir.

    After that terrifying tale, Dave told us about another moment he and Anatoly shared, floating high above Earth, staring out into the universe ... a moment so beautiful, and peaceful, we decided to use the audience recreate it, as best we could, for the final act of our live show.
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    Radiolab - Inside Ouch! Tim Howard

    25:07

    Radiolab - Inside Ouch! [Tim Howard]
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    Pain is a fundamental part of life, and often a very lonely part. Doctors want to understand their patients' pain, and we all want to understand the suffering of our friends, relatives, or spouses. But pinning down another person's hurt is a slippery business.
    Is your relentless lower back pain more or less unbearable than my crushing headache? Problem is, pain is maddeningly subjective. In this short, producer Tim Howard introduces us to three attempts to put a number on pain in the hopes that we can truly understand the suffering of another.

    We begin with entomologist Justin Schmidt's globe-trotting adventure to plot the relative nastiness of insect bites and stings. Then, Paula Michaels, a professor in the History of Medicine at the University of Iowa, brings us back to 1948, to a well-intentioned but ultimately misguided attempt to demystify the pain of childbirth. And we end with a very modern, very personal struggle for understanding as non-fiction writer Eula Biss tries to rate her own chronic pain.
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    Radiolab - Antibodies Part 1: CRISPR Jennifer Doudna, Eugene V. Koonin, Beth Shapiro, Carl Zimmer

    31:48

    Radiolab - Antibodies Part 1: CRISPR [Jennifer Doudna, Eugene V. Koonin, Beth Shapiro, Carl Zimmer]
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    Hidden inside some of the world’s smallest organisms is one of the most powerful tools scientists have ever stumbled across. It's a defense system that has existed in bacteria for millions of years and it may some day let us change the course of human evolution.
    Out drinking with a few biologists, Jad finds out about something called CRISPR. No, it’s not a robot or the latest dating app, it’s a method for genetic manipulation that is rewriting the way we change DNA. Scientists say they’ll someday be able to use CRISPR to fight cancer and maybe even bring animals back from the dead. Or, pretty much do whatever you want. Jad and Robert delve into how CRISPR does what it does, and consider whether we should be worried about a future full of flying pigs, or the simple fact that scientists have now used CRISPR to tweak the genes of human embryos.
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    Radiolab: Death and the Periodic Table

    9:23

    The poetic properties of bismuth.

    More from Radiolab at

    Radiolab's Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich hoist two frothy pink glasses in tribute to one special element near the bottom of the periodic table: bismuth. Recorded in Seattle for Radiolab's live show Apocalyptical.

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