Michelle Rhee gives Olin Lecture on public education reform

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    Michelle Rhee gives Olin Lecture on public education reform

    56:25

    Michelle Rhee '92, a nationally recognized entrepreneur and champion of education reform, delivers the 2012 Olin Lecture, June 8 as part of Reunion Weekend.

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    Olin Lecture 2012: Michelle Rhee 92

    56:50

    Michelle Rhee '92, former Chancellor of Washington D.C. public schools, addresses the state of public schools and how necessary reform doesn't come easy.

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    Public education -- are we under, over or just misspending? Michelle Rhee at TEDxWallStreet

    16:38

    Michelle began her career as a Teach for America corps member in Baltimore. In 1997, Michelle founded and led The New Teacher Project, which recruits and trains teachers to work in urban schools. From 2007 to 2010, Michelle served as chancellor of District of Columbia Public Schools. Under her stewardship, D.C. schools experienced increases in student achievement, a rise in graduation rates and an upswing — for the first time in decades — in enrollment. Working in education over the past twenty years, time after time I saw obstacles keeping kids from getting what they needed from their schools. Yes, there were challenges that were going to be difficult to overcome no matter what, but so many practices just didn't make sense and were completely within our power to change. When I tried to change them, I found out why the status quo had persisted for so long. Groups that put the interests of adults in the system first were driving the conversation, and they were backed by big dollars and political power. What we needed was a collective voice solely representing kids' best interests, because the sense of balance was completely gone. I started StudentsFirst to change that. Schools exist to give kids the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed, and EVERY decision has to revolve around that.

    More information at

    About TEDx, x = independently organized event:

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.*

    (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    Michelle Rhee, Former Chancellor of Washington D.C. Public Schools

    56:03

    Michelle Rhee is the founder and CEO of StudentsFirst, a grassroots movement that seeks to mobilize parents, teachers, students, and administrators throughout the country in an effort to bring about meaningful results in education reform at both the local and national level. In 2007, Washington DC Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Rhee as Chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools, a school district serving more than 47,000 students in 123 schools. She was previously a Teach for America corps member in Baltimore City. She has a bachelor's degree in government from Cornell University and a master's degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She spoke at HSPH as part of the Decision-making: Voices from the Field series about Leading the Fight for Education Reform on October 15, 2012. Watch the entire series at

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    An Education Agenda for the Next President

    1:5:04

    Founder of StudentsFirst and former Chancellor of Washington D.C. Public Schools, Michelle Rhee joined Paul Reville, a professor of Practice of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for a conversation about the future of education policy. She spoke regarding the prevalence of standardized testing, emphasizing that no education reformer considers standardized tests to be an exhaustive measure of a student’s ability. She continued that the teacher would always look beyond mere test scores to gauge a student’s ability, yet standardized tests do provide the initial value of comparing where students stand. Maggie Williams, Director of the Institute of Politics at the Harvard Kennedy School, introduced the program.

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    Michelle Rhee: Lead from the Front

    55:53

    Education activist Michelle Rhee offered three pieces of advice to students and stressed the importance of public education, great teachers, and advocating for kids. Rhee is the former chancellor of Washington, DC public schools and founder and CEO of StudentsFirst.

    Rhee spoke at Stanford Graduate School of Business as part of the View From The Top speaker series.

    More about the View From The Top speaker series:


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    StudentsFirst

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    Why Teach For America Works - Michelle Rhee

    5:04

    Complete video at:

    Michelle Rhee, Chancellor of D.C. Public Schools, shares some prominent moments in Teach For America and how they have affected her reform ideals. She describes her personal experience discovering and participating in the program.

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    Transforming the System: An Interview with Michelle Rhee with Eli Broad. - Aspen Institute

    Michelle Rhee is chancellor of DC Public Schools, a district with 50,000 students and 144 schools. She is also the founder of The New Teacher Project, a nationally recognized leader in developing innovative solutions to the challenges of hiring new teachers.

    As president and CEO of TNTP, Rhee partnered with school districts, state education agencies, nonprofit organizations, and unions to transform the way difficult-to-staff schools recruit, select, and train highly qualified teachers.

    Her work resulted in widespread reform in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Miami, New York, Oakland, and Philadelphia. Rhee's commitment to excellence in education began in a Baltimore classroom as a Teach-for-America teacher. Rhee currently serves on the advisory boards for the National Council on Teacher Quality, the National Center for Alternative Certification, and Project REACH of the University of Phoenix's School of Education.

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    Michelle Rhee on Education Reform

    24:57

    On June 15, 2011, Michelle Rhee, Founder and CEO of Students First, spoke at Roosevelt House on education reform and creating schools of excellence.

    Michelle Rhee began her career as a Teach for America (TFA) corps member in a Harlem Park Community School in Baltimore City. Through her own trial and error in the classroom, she gained a tremendous respect for the hard work that teachers do every day. She also learned the lesson that would drive her mission for years to come: teachers are the most powerful driving force behind student achievement in our schools. In 1997 Ms. Rhee founded The New Teacher Project (TNTP) to bring more excellent teachers to classrooms across the country. Under her leadership TNTP became a leading organization in understanding and developing innovative solutions to the challenges of new teacher hiring. As Chief Executive Officer and President, Ms. Rhee partnered with school districts, state education agencies; non-profit organizations and unions to transform the way schools and other organizations recruit, select and train 23,000 highly qualified teachers in difficult-to-staff schools.

    On June 12, 2007, Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Chancellor Rhee to lead the District of Columbia Public Schools. Under her leadership, the worst performing school district in the country became the only major city system to see double-digit growth in both their state reading and state math scores in seventh, eighth and tenth grades over three years. In 2010, she left DCPS to found her own organization - Students First - which she describes as a grassroots movement designed to mobilize parents, teachers, students, administrators, and citizens throughout country, and to channel their energy to produce meaningful results on both the local and national level.

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    Michelle Rhee and Kevin Johnson

    1:8:00

    Michelle Rhee and Kevin Johnson: How to Transform American Education

    Michelle Rhee, Founder and CEO, Students First; Former Chancellor, District of Columbia Public School System
    Kevin Johnson, Mayor of Sacramento; Chair, U.S. Conference of Mayors Task Force on Public Education

    Students First is an organization that Rhee calls a national movement to transform education. In her controversial three years as chancellor of the Washington, D.C., school system, she closed nearly two dozen schools, cut administrative positions and proposed that teacher salaries be based on merit rather than tenure. Today, her goal is to put pressure on elected officials and press for changes in legislation to make things better for kids. Sacramento Mayor Johnson says he's committed to identifying ways to strategically drive education reform. Upon retiring from the NBA after 12 seasons with the Phoenix Suns, Johnson returned to his hometown of Sacramento to serve as the CEO of St. HOPE, a nonprofit community development organization he founded to revitalize inner-city communities. Hear from these two leaders about what can be done to save the American education system.

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    Michelle Rhee, Former Chancellor of Washington D.C. Public Schools | HSPH

    56:03

    Michelle Rhee is the founder and CEO of StudentsFirst, a grassroots movement that seeks to mobilize parents, teachers, students, and administrators throughout the country in an effort to bring about meaningful results in education reform at both the local and national level. In 2007, Washington DC Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Rhee as Chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools, a school district serving more than 47,000 students in 123 schools. She was previously Teach for America corps member in Baltimore City. She has a bachelor's degree in government from Cornell University and a master's degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She spoke at HSPH as part of the Decision-making: Voices from the Field series about Leading the Fight for Education Reform on October 15, 2012. Watch the entire series at

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    Trump looks to Michelle Rhee for education secretary

    1:57

    President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team confirmed they are meeting with Michelle Rhee for the Secretary of Education position.
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    A Two-Tier Proposal for Teacher Pay - Michelle Rhee

    2:44

    Complete video at:

    Michelle Rhee, Chancellor of D.C. Public Schools, discusses her proposal to establish two pay tiers for teachers in the D.C. area. She explains how the proposal met with opposition from teachers' unions, as one of the tiers required teachers to give up their tenure.

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    Transforming the System: An Interview with Michelle Rhee. This program was recorded in collaboration with Aspen Ideas Festival 2009.

    Michelle Rhee is chancellor of DC Public Schools, a district with 50,000 students and 144 schools. She is also the founder of The New Teacher Project, a nationally recognized leader in developing innovative solutions to the challenges of hiring new teachers.

    As president and CEO of TNTP, Rhee partnered with school districts, state education agencies, nonprofit organizations, and unions to transform the way difficult-to-staff schools recruit, select, and train highly qualified teachers.

    Her work resulted in widespread reform in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Miami, New York, Oakland, and Philadelphia. Rhee's commitment to excellence in education began in a Baltimore classroom as a Teach-for-America teacher. Rhee currently serves on the advisory boards for the National Council on Teacher Quality, the National Center for Alternative Certification, and Project REACH of the University of Phoenix's School of Education.

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    Michelle Rhee Resignation

    9:31

    Michelle Rhee has resigned from her position as Chancellor of D.C. Public Schools. Here is her official statement, which she delivered on Wednesday, October 13:

    Today, Mayor Fenty, Chairman Gray and I have reached the mutual decision that I will leave my post as Chancellor of the D.C. Public School System. This is not a decision we made lightly. But it is one that I believe is essential to allow Chairman Gray to pursue our shared goal of uniting this city behind the school reforms that are making a difference in the lives of our children. In short, we have agreed — together — that the best way to keep the reforms going is for this reformer to step aside.

    Chairman Gray has made his commitment to continuing the progress and the reforms clear to me and to the team of dedicated DCPS staff who have done so much to turn our schools around. His support of the decision to make Deputy Chancellor Kaya Henderson the Interim Chancellor of DCPS should put to rest any fears of what reform will look like under the Gray administration. The answer is that reform will continue.

    With Kaya Henderson at the helm and the DCPS management team in place, everything the city needs to be able to continue the reforms will be in place. I have a high degree of confidence in this team. They are the most talented and dedicated team of any school district in the nation and they will continue to focus on creating a world-class educational system for our kids.

    I've put my blood, sweat and tears into the children of the District for the last three and a half years and have completely enjoyed every moment of it. I'm honored and humbled for the opportunity to have served these very deserving young people. The thought of not being in this role anymore is heartbreaking, to put it mildly, but it's right for the school system and right for the children. As I told Chairman Gray, he should be able to start his term as Mayor with the same privilege I've enjoyed for the past three and a half years — to work with someone that he chose and has full confidence in. He ran a great campaign, will lead a great city and deserves the opportunity to work toward his goal of One City with a team that shares his vision, can keep the progress going and help bridge the divide.

    I want to thank Chairman Gray, as this was a difficult decision for both of us. In the course of our discussions, we found common ground in our commitment to wanting to do what is right for the children of this city. I am proud to give him the best team of people to help him begin his mission and I am confident in the continued success of our reforms under Mayor Gray.

    I want to thank the parents, the teachers and the community of DCPS. You've emailed me, you've called me, you've come to the coffees and the office hours, you've never been shy about telling me when you disagreed with me, and because of you, we are bringing change into every corner of this city. And to the students — you are the greatest! I have the utmost of confidence in the young people of this city to do great things. You've not disappointed...

    Finally I want to thank Mayor Fenty for the support and friendship that he has provided since the beginning. His commitment has been steadfast and his impatience for improvements to give every child in this city a world-class education has at times even surpassed mine. The children who attend public school in our city are the true beneficiaries of his character and his leadership.

    Thank you, Chairman Gray, Mayor Fenty and Interim Chancellor Henderson.

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    Michelle Rhee in DC: Episode 1 - Pt 1

    6:58

    Washington D.C.'s new superintendent Michelle Rhee promises to turn D.C.'s failing school system around. But she's facing some pretty big challenges and skepticism from a city that has heard promises from 6 superintendents in the last 10 years.

    Part 1 in our year-long series on leadership and school reform efforts. Be sure to watch the companion segment in New Orleans.

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    WASHINGTON WATCH: Michelle Rhee On Education Reform, Accountability In Schools, New Book Radical

    8:32

    A report recently published by Harvard University found that students in Latvia, Chile and Brazil are making gains in academics three times faster than American students, while those in Portugal, Hong Kong, Germany, Poland, Liechtenstein, Slovenia, Colombia and Lithuania are improving at twice the rate. Unfortunately, African-American and poor students bear the brunt of the problems with America's educational system.

    Michelle Rhee is the founder of Students First, a political advocacy organization for education reform, and she believes part of the solution to the problem might be found in who's teaching our children.

    Subscribe to the Washington Watch Video Podcast on iTunes @

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    The Education of Michelle Rhee Cheating Scandal

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    FRONTLINE examines the legacy of Michelle Rhee, former Chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools.

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    The Education of Michelle Rhee -- Cheating Scandal

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    FRONTLINE's The Education of Michelle Rhee examines the legacy of the former Chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools.

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    Michelle Rhee: Charter Schools Are Not a Magic Bullet for Education Reform

    2:17

    Michelle Rhee, Students First: I don’t think charter schools are the only answer. You still need the kinds of laws that say if you are a low-performing charter school we will close you down. Charter schools are not the end-all and be-all soluti

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    Michelle Rhee | Speaking.com

    20:23



    Michelle Rhee, founder of StudentsFirst, has been working for the last 18 years to give children the skills and knowledge they will need to compete in a changing world. From adding instructional time after school and visiting students' homes as a third grade teacher in Baltimore, to hosting hundreds of community meetings and creating a Youth Cabinet to bring students' voices into reforming the DC Public Schools, she has always been guided by one core principle: put students first.

    Each chapter of Michelle's story has convinced her: students of every background and ZIP code can achieve at high levels, and for our schools to become what children deserve, every educator is called to believe this. Even in the toughest of circumstances, all teachers are called to turn the incredible potential that fills their classrooms daily, into the achievements worthy of our children and country.

    Teaching with Teach for America

    As a Teach for America (TFA) corps member in a Harlem Park Community School in Baltimore City, through her own trial and error in the classroom, she gained a tremendous respect for the hard work that teachers do every day. She also learned the lesson that would drive her mission for years to come: teachers are the most powerful driving force behind student achievement in our schools.

    Bringing Excellent Teachers to Classrooms across America - TNTP

    In 1997 Ms. Rhee founded The New Teacher Project (TNTP) to bring more excellent teachers to classrooms across the country. Under her leadership TNTP became a leading organization in understanding and developing innovative solutions to the challenges of new teacher hiring. As Chief Executive Officer and President, Ms. Rhee partnered with school districts, state education agencies, non-profit organizations and unions to transform the way schools and other organizations recruit, select and train highly qualified teachers in difficult-to-staff schools.

    Her work with TNTP implemented widespread reform in teacher hiring practices, improving teacher hiring in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Miami, New York, Oakland and Philadelphia. TNTP placed 23,000 new, high-quality teachers in these schools across the country.

    Driving Unprecedented Growth in the D.C. Public Schools

    On June 12, 2007, Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Chancellor Rhee to lead the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), a school district serving more than 47,000 students in 123 schools. Under her leadership, the worst performing school district in the country became the only major city system to see double-digit growth in both their state reading and state math scores in seventh, eighth and tenth grades over three years.

    The graduation rate rose, and after steep declines enrollment rose for the first time in forty years. In her last year as chancellor, every eligible DC public school attracted applicants for the annual K-12 Out-of-Boundary, preschool, and pre-Kindergarten (pre-K) lotteries. Fourteen schools had waitlists for the first time. Ultimately, a record high of 5,219 families, representing an increase of 50 percent over 2009, expressed interest in DCPS programs located in all eight wards.

    Collaborating with Pioneers

    Michelle Rhee currently serves on the Advisory Boards for the National Council on Teacher Quality, the National Center for Alternative Certification, and Project REACH of the University of Phoenix's School of Education.

    Education

    Michelle has a bachelor's degree in government from Cornell University and a master's in public policy from Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

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    What Did We Learn from Michelle Rhee? 2/25/2011

    6:28

    Richard Whitmire, Author of The Bee Eater, discusses education reform.

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    The New Teacher Project & Beyond | Education Reformist Michelle Rhee

    13:16

    Michelle A. Rhee is an American educator and an advocate for education reform. She was Chancellor of the Washington, D.C. public schools from 2007 to 2010. Michelle is a pioneer of her field and is radically reinventing education for the better of youth across the nation.

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    Michelle Rhee: U.S. Now 25th In The World For Education

    3:12

    Education reform advocate Michelle Rhee talks about how far the U.S. has fallen when compared to education in the rest of the world.

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    The real experts of education reform | Oliver Sicat | TEDxOrangeCoast

    12:52

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Empower our students and teachers, who are closest to the problems of learning, to make decisions, says Oliver Sicat. In his talk, Oliver explains how students, teachers and parents are the key to really impacting the education reform, and the education of tomorrow.

    Oliver Sicat is the CEO of Ednovate, a personalized learning charter management organization founded in partnership with USC that is redesigning the American High School experience.

    Before that Oliver served as Chief Portfolio Officer within the Chicago Public Schools (CPS). As an executive cabinet member, he improved student achievement results for 403,000 students attending 675 schools.

    Oliver has also been a successful teacher, non-profit founder and charter school principal. In 2006, Oliver was named Teacher of the Year in the Boston Public Schools, and his non-profit, Emagine, was nationally recognized for its work preparing first-generation college students for college. He moved to Chicago to build a school for the Noble Network of Charter Schools, and under his leadership, it became the #1 non-selective school in Chicago in 2011 and remains #1 today.

    Oliver graduated from the University of Southern California and received his Masters degree from Harvard University


    About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    Transforming the System: An Interview with Michelle Rhee

    1:16:07

    Aspen Ideas Festival, 2009.

    Washington D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee — one of the nation's leaders on reforming public education — discusses with philanthropist Eli Broad her efforts to reverse the decline of the schools in the nation's capital.

    Speakers: Eli Broad, Michelle Rhee

    The Aspen Ideas Festival is the nation's premier, public gathering place for leaders from around the globe and across many disciplines to engage in deep and inquisitive discussion of the ideas and issues that both shape our lives and challenge our times. Learn more at:

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    Teaching Is a Privilege, Not a Right

    2:28

    Michelle Rhee, Students First: Teachers need to be engaged ambassadors in the push for education reform.

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    Michelle Rhee: High Quality Education Is the Best Tool to Fight Poverty

    3:18

    Michelle Rhee, Students First: If you look at any circumstance, the best tool to fight intergenerational poverty is a high quality education. It is more incumbent upon educators to help poor students get a high quality education.

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    Michelle Rhee: Radical: Fighting to Put Students First - May 22, 2013

    1:40:52

    Educator Michelle Rhee joined Library Director Crosby Kemper III for a public conversation about her new book Radical: Fighting to Put Students First and explained her ideas for improving public education by ensuring that laws, leaders, and politics are making students - not adults - their top priority.

    Rhee is past chancellor of the Washington D.C. Public Schools and the founder, CEO, and president of the New Teacher Project. In 2010, she founded StudentsFirst, a non-profit organization which works on education reform issues such as ending teacher tenure. This event was co-sponsored by the Show-Me Institute.

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    Evaluating Education Reform: Lecture by Diane Ravitch

    40:39

    An evening with Diane Ravitch on September 30, 2013 at Stanford University was focused on her book, Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools (Knopf, 2013).

    In Reign of Error, Ravitch argues against privatization and for public education, and in a chapter-by-chapter breakdown, puts forth a plan for what can be done to preserve and improve public education. In her lecture, she discusses the topics she addresses in her book, including the strengths of U.S. education, how policy makers are failing to address the root causes of educational failure, and how to effectively address the challenges.

    A moderated discussion followed, featuring Ravitch; Eric Hanushek, the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University; Linda Darling-Hammond, the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford and founding director of SCOPE; and Channa Mae Cook, former principal and teacher and current Stanford doctoral student. Peter Schrag, former editorial page editor and columnist for the Sacramento Bee, moderated. Watch the panel discussion:

    Diane Ravitch is Research Professor of Education at New York University. From 1991 to 1993, she was Assistant Secretary of Education; from 1997 to 2004, she was a member of the National Assessment Governing Board. She has authored numerous books, including Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools (2013), and The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education (2010). She is an honorary life trustee of the New York Public Library and a former Guggenheim Fellow. She was a member of the Koret Task Force at the Hoover Institution (Stanford University) from 1999 to 2009. She was a member of the board of the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation from 1996 to 2009. She blogs at dianeravitch.net.

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    Hannah Nguyen Calls Out Michelle Rhee

    2:02

    The chilling rumor of Michelle Rhee becoming Trump’s Secretary of Education put me in mind of education activist Hannah Nguyen. I met Hannah after fortuitously video taping her throw-down of Michelle Rhee in Los Angeles. The vid went viral with over 20,000 hits. Here is an edited version I used in my documentary “Hop. VP

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    A discussion with StudentsFirst founder Michelle Rhee | 26.06.2012

    1:8:20

    Michelle Rhee began her career by teaching for three years in an inner city school, before founding and running The New Teacher Project, which in ten years recruited and trained more than 23,000 new teachers to work in urban schools across the United States.

    In 2007, Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Michelle to lead the District of Columbia Public Schools, a school district serving more than 47,000 students in 123 schools. Under her leadership, the worst performing school district in the country became the only major city system to see double-digit growth in both their state reading and state maths scores in the seventh, eighth and tenth grades over three years. The graduation rate rose, and after steep declines, enrollment rose for the first time in forty years.

    In 2010, Michelle set up StudentsFirst, an organisation that works with parents, teachers and citizens across the US to ensure great teachers are rewarded appropriately, novice teachers receive the training they need and ineffective teachers are removed from schools.

    Michelle also appeared in Davis Guggenheim's 2010 Waiting for Superman, a documentary about the state of public education in America.

    Secretary of State for Education Michael Gove will give a brief introduction for Ms Rhee.

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    From 2nd Grade Teacher to Spearheading an Educational Non Profit | Education Reformist Michelle Rhee

    13:21

    Michelle A. Rhee is an American educator and an advocate for education reform. She was Chancellor of the Washington, D.C. public schools from 2007 to 2010.

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    FRONTLINE | Preview The Education of Michelle Rhee | PBS

    32

    Coming January 8th, 2013. FRONTLINE examines the legacy of one of America's most admired & reviled school reformers.

    FRONTLINE correspondent John Merrow was granted unprecedented access to Michelle Rhee, former chancellor of the Washington, DC public schools as she attempted to fix a broken school system.

    Watch on air and online beginning January 8th at 10:00 pm ET on PBS.

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    How to make the case for education reform | VISION TALKS

    15:46

    Education reform is one of America's most pivotal topics. But after 30 years of school reform with mixed results, are we lacking ideas? Or do we lack ways to effectively communicate those ideas? Arthur Brooks shows you the secrets to talking about your plans to make America's schools a better place.

    Let us know what you thought of the talk by taking this survey—we’ll send you a free e-book of our latest work on education as a thank you!

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    More from Arthur Brooks:


    Partial transcript:
    What I’m going to tell you in the next 15 minutes is how each of you can be as skilled as the composer of that piece of music that we’re listening to right now.

    Now, what is that music? That’s the second Brandenburg concerto in F major by Johann Sebastian Bach. It was written in about the year 1710, when Bach was about 25 years old. It was written for the Margrave of Brandenburg, a man by the name of Christian Ludwig. Christian Ludwig was a prince from the House of Prussia. This was written for him by Bach, and was one of a number of compositions that you’re probably familiar with. If you like classical music at all, you know that piece. You know Johann Sebastian Bach.

    What you don’t know is how incredibly productive Bach was as a composer. That’s one of more than 1,000 pieces written by Bach – incredibly productive. The pieces fell off his pen – cantatas, orchestral suites, chamber music, keyboard pieces. It’s awe inspiring what he was able to do. He also, by the way, during his productive life had 20 children. That’s productive. (Laughter.)

    Now, he was dedicated to more than just his compositions. He was dedicated to his family, and you’d think he would be given all these children that he had. And many of his children grew up to be more famous composers in his time than he was. Probably principally famous at his time was Johann Christian Bach, one of his older children, who went to become one of Mozart’s early teachers, as a matter of fact.

    Bach wasn’t that famous as a composer during his lifetime. He was pretty well known as a teacher. He only became sort of the rock star of classical music 100 years after his death. He died in 1750. In 1850, Felix Mendelssohn, a later composer, discovered his manuscripts and showed his friend and said, you have to hear this. This stuff is really great. During this time, he was known as a good teacher and a good father.

    Now, you might be asking yourself, why do I know so much about Bach and or maybe you’re asking yourself why the heck are you talking about Bach? Well, I’ll tell you.

    This is not my first career. I didn’t start out as a think tank president. It’s not even my second career. Before this, I was a college professor, but I started out my career spending 12 years as a professional French horn player. I made my living playing chamber music that I wound up in the city orchestra of Barcelona for a number of seasons.

    And when I was in the Barcelona symphony, I listened to a lot to Bach. I played a lot of Bach. Bach is my favorite composer. I took great inspiration even on my worst days from listening to the great music of Johann Sebastian Bach.

    And I want to tell you something about Bach that had a particular impression on me that sort of changed my life. See, I was reading a book about Bach in the days that I was in the orchestra, and, you know, he was recording some of his thoughts for posterity to a biographer. And the biographer asked him a very simple question at one point. He said, why do you write music? It’s an odd question. It’s not how do you write music or where do you get your inspiration. Why do you write music? Maybe somebody has asked you that question. Probably not. Why do you what you do. But that was the question posed to Bach.

    And here was his answer. Actually, let me tell you the answer you’d expect. You’d expect a 30-minute boring exegesis about composition from a professional composer or a glib materialistic response like, it’s a living, right? That’s what people say. That’s not what Bach said. Here’s what he said, quote: “The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul.” That is his answer.

    Now, that had a huge impression on me. Why? I asked myself, what would my answer be? What do you play the French horn? Why are you a college professor? Why are you a think tank president? What would your answer be to that question?

    How to make the case for education reform

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    Michelle Rhee This Week Interview: Author of Radical: Fighting to Put Students First.

    4:03

    Controversial education reformer, author of the new book Radical: Fighting to Put Students First.

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    Education for opportunity: 3 ideas for American education reform

    5:36

    Education reform has the potential to open incredible doors to opportunity. Yet despite unprecedented levels of public school funding, far too many students in America never enjoy the benefits that can result from a high-quality education.

    In his new book, “Education and Opportunity,” Michael Q. McShane proposes a market-based approach to revitalizing failing American schools — one that fosters innovation and encourages competition via school choice, education savings accounts, and charter schools. But as with any sector of the economy that moves from a public monopoly to market-led solutions, smart stabilization and support from other institutions are essential for making a decentralized school system effective.

    McShane lays out a compelling case for education reform that encourages wiser use of technology and a “marketplace of education options” that can help today’s students succeed in tomorrow’s economy

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    Partial transcript:
    Did you know that Americans without a high school diploma, compared to college graduates, are three times more likely to be unemployed, and even those with high school diplomas average fifty percent less in annual income than those with college degrees? But the gap between the educational “haves” and “have-nots” is vast and only growing wider.
    Take Jennifer, a fourth grader born into the poorest 20 percent. Without a college degree, she only has a 5 percent chance of reaching the top, compared to a 45 percent chance of staying in poverty. With a college degree, she’s more likely to make it to the top quintile than she is to remain in the bottom. A quality education makes an enormous difference.
    But it will be an uphill climb because Jennifer’s family will have fewer options for where she can attend school. Wealthier families can afford to live in better school districts or to pay for private schools. Jennifer can only hope the local public school is decent, or take her chances and try to get into a magnet school or a charter school.
    The truth is, our education system stacks the odds against the poorest children, like Jennifer. But here’s the thing: it’s not a spending problem. In inflation-adjusted terms, the average yearly spending per student from 1970 to today has more than doubled. Some of the cities in the United States with the most grinding poverty actually spend among the most per student. Since 1950, while the overall number of students has grown 96 percent, the total number of teachers and staff has grown 252 percent and a whopping 702 percent, respectively. Jobs are opening for Miss Penny and Principal Jones, but it’s not working for Jennifer.
    The problem with the American educational system remains just that—the system. The way we pay for, organize and regulate schools does not foster innovative and entrepreneurial solutions. School districts have become bloated bureaucracies that stifle creativity. It’s demoralizing, it’s dehumanizing, and it hurts kids like Jennifer. The good news? We can change it. There are three big steps we can take right now.

    American schools are failing: 3 ideas for education reform

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    Teachers With Guns In Schools And Bringing Back PE: Michelle Rhee Weighs In

    2:26

    Former Chancellor of the DC Public School System, Founder and CEO of StudentsFirst, Michelle Rhee answers social media questions about hot button topics in education.

    WATCH the full interview on Politicking with Larry King

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    Seth Godin on Education Reform

    11:15

    Seth Godin interviewed by Graham Brown-Martin about education reform

    Follow on Twitter @GrahamBM

    Blog:

    Camera by Kevin Grant

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    Michelle Rhee on saving Americas schools.mov

    6:54

    In case you missed it, Michelle Rhee appeared on CNN this weekend, where she spoke about education issues and unveiled the latest ad from StudentsFirst. The ad highlights the challenges facing America's education system in the 21st Century and the need for reforms that will help ensure all students receive the education they need to compete in today's global economy.

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    Hunter Lecture Series 2011-2012: Michelle Rhee

    6:22

    Michelle Rhee spoke in Chattanooga, TN as a part of the George T. Hunter Lecture Series on September 20, 2011.

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    Dropout Nation: Michelle Rhee on Teacher Quality and the Achievement Gap

    2:35

    The D.C. Public Schools Chancellor discusses how to improve the quality of teachers and address achievement gaps in a 2008 House Education and Labor Committee hearing.

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    2013 Olin Lecture: The Meaning of the Vietnam War

    1:6:59

    Live broadcast - It's perhaps the most important question of America's past half century: Why did we go to war in Vietnam? On June 7, 2013 at 3 p.m., Cornell history professor Fredrik Logevall, one of the world's leading scholars of the war, will consider U.S. intervention in Vietnam anew, drawing from his Pulitzer Prize-winning new book, Embers of War.

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    Michelle Rhee Highlights Some Very Effective School Districts

    2:02

    Michelle Rhee, an educator and education reform advocate, talks about a couple school districts that are getting it right with education reform.

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    Why we should be worried about current educational reforms

    1:2:51

    Dean's Lecture Series 2012
    Presented by the Melbourne Graduate School of Education

    Speaker: Professor Michael Apple

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    Michelle Rhee, DC School Chancellor on Measuring Principals on Performance | The Wallace Foundation

    1:22

    Washington DC Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee on measuring principals on performance and setting goals for educational improvement.


    In a candid conversation about the many challenges of turning around the public school system in the nation's capital, PBS Education Correspondent John Merrow interviews Washington D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty and the District's Schools Chancellor, Michelle Rhee.

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    Michelle Rhee

    3:24

    DC Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee

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    David Hansens Lecture: Is Education Possible Today?

    1:12:52

    David Hansen's Weinberg lecture poses the question whether education is possible today. He addresses three prevalent responses to the question: (1) that it is obviously possible since we can see all around us teachers and students working in classrooms, (2) that it is obviously not possible because the educational system has been subverted to serve the ends of a global economic order, and (3) that education remains possible because of the inextinguishable human quest for meaning even in the face of unjust societal conditions. Hansen also argues that while there is evidence to support the three responses, they all in eff ect dismiss the question of education's possibility and thus undermine its authentic enactment. Hansen suggests that the question of education is the one question we need to keep open in order to ensure the continuation of education itself. David Hansen was recently named the John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg Professor in the Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education at Teachers College. His books include the widely cited The Call to Teach (1995), Exploring the Moral Heart of Teaching (2001), Ethical Visions of Education (2007), and most recently The Teacher and the World (2011).

    David Hansen is a Past-President of the John Dewey Society and of the Philosophy of Education Society, and is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. He is currently leading a funded three-year-long inquiry, alongside sixteen teachers from New York City schools, that is entitled What does it mean to be a person in the world today?

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    Michelle Rhee: 20th Annual Conference General Session Keynote Address

    20:18

    Michelle Rhee, founder and CEO of StudentsFirst, gives the keynote address at the second General Session of the 20th Annual Charter Schools Conference & Anniversary Celebration in San Diego on March 13, 2013.

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    Meghan Gardner Lectures at Harvard Graduate School of Education

    59:05

    Founder of Zombie Summer Camp and Wizards & Warriors Summer Camp in Burlington, MA, Meghan Gardner presents a lecture at Harvard GSE about Informal Education as it applies to Guard Up's story-based educational summer camps. ZombieSummerCamp.com and SwordSummerCamp.com Call (781) 270-4800 for more information.

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    MPC 13 - Michelle Rhee Keynote Address

    46:05

    Description

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    StudentsFirst.org - Michelle Rhee Answers Your Questions - Ask Michelle

    5:34

    Share your thoughts:

    Rewarding Great Teachers: 0:41
    Unions and Collective Bargaining: 2:28
    Charter Schools: 3:46

    As StudentsFirst grows we want to make sure that your questions about the movement and education reform are answered. Watch Michelle's video and share it with friends!

    What do you think about collective bargaining, rewarding great teachers, and public charter schools? Share your feedback to our video now.

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