Kurt Godel


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    Kurt Godel: The Worlds Most Incredible Mind

    15:00

    Kurt Godel: The World's Most Incredible Mind.

    Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine ~ Godel

    Kurt Godel (1931) proved two important things about any axiomatic system rich enough to include all of number theory.

    1) You'll never be able to prove every true result..... you'll never be able to prove every result that is true in your system.

    2) Godel also proved that one of the results that you can never prove is the result that says that the system is consistent. More precisely: You cannot prove the consistency of any mathematical system rich enough to include the known theory of numbers.

    Hence, any consistent mathematical system that is rich enough to include number theory is inherently incomplete.

    Second, one of the propositions whose truth or falsity cannot be proved within the system is precisely the proposition that states that the system is consistent.

    What Godel's proof means, then, is that we can't prove that arithmetic—let alone any more-complicated system—is consistent.

    For 2000 years, mathematics has been the model—the subject—that convinces us that certainty is possible. Yet Now there's no certainty anywhere—not even in mathematics.

    More...

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    Kurt Godel: The Worlds Most Incredible Mind

    14:55

    Kurt Godel: The World's Most Incredible Mind.

    Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine ~ Godel

    Kurt Godel (1931) proved two important things about any axiomatic system rich enough to include all of number theory.

    1) You'll never be able to prove every true result..... you'll never be able to prove every result that is true in your system.

    2) Godel also proved that one of the results that you can never prove is the result that says that the system is consistent. More precisely: You cannot prove the consistency of any mathematical system rich enough to include the known theory of numbers.

    Hence, any consistent mathematical system that is rich enough to include number theory is inherently incomplete.

    Second, one of the propositions whose truth or falsity cannot be proved within the system is precisely the proposition that states that the system is consistent.

    What Godel's proof means, then, is that we can't prove that arithmetic—let alone any more-complicated system—is consistent.

    For 2000 years, mathematics has been the model—the subject—that convinces us that certainty is possible. Yet Now there's no certainty anywhere—not even in mathematics.

    More...

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    Gödels Incompleteness Theorem - Numberphile

    13:53

    Marcus du Sautoy discusses Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem
    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    Extra Footage Part One:
    Extra Footage Part Two:

    Professor du Sautoy is Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford.

    Professor du Sautoy's book as mentioned...
    In the US it is called The Great Unknown -
    In the UK it is called What We Cannot Know -
    More of his books:

    Discuss this one on Brady's subreddit:

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    Kurt Gödel - from the Limits of understanding

    3:38

    A brief bio of Kurt Gödel from :-
    The Limits of Understanding - World Science Festival

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    22/42 The Secrets of Kurt Gödel 1080 HD

    14:43

    for more info.

    This is part 22 of 42. As you may have noticed, I am releasing them totally out of order, but that won't matter. In this part we begin our study of Kurt Gödel. We will focus on Gödel from parts 22-28.

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    IQ 200+ | Smartest person ever

    12:58

    Part one (of four) of a meta-analysis ranking of the world's 37 greatest geniuses, child prodigies, and thinkers ever said to have had an IQ of 200 or above, with a countdown to the #1 all-time smartest person ever:



    Smartest person alive | existive (2013) rankings:



    Video history

    This listing originated out of a personal home collection folder, and was first online with 15 people listed in 2008:



    A quickly-made first draft 10-minute YouTube video (IQ 200+ | Smartest person ever) was online in 2009, with about 18 individuals, getting about 30,000 views. This new 2010, 52-minute, four-part, version is the most up-to-date version with more references and newly found individuals, and re-ranked in a cogent realistic manner (the original version simply listed people in descending order of IQ, which began to become nonsensical, e.g. listing people like De Mello, Kearney, and Cawley, above Newton). A detailing of the references to each IQ estimate is found here:



    Maxwell's 1878 A Paradoxical Ode:



    New expanded (under-construction) Genius IQ table (IQ=140+):



    (a realistic meta-analysis ranking of all known geniuses and their known or estimated IQs).

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    Math genius Worlds greatest math prodigy Mathematics savant Maths 3.14 Pi Day March 14 Daniel Tammet

    8:14

    At 3.14 (3 minutes 14 seconds) David Letterman learns what pi means! Daniel Tammet is an amazing math genius who memorised pi to 20,000 places. Is he the world's greatest math prodigy? He is an amazing mathematics savant or maths prodigy.

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    Visualizing Fermats Last Theorem

    3:35

    Fermat's Last Theorem has been a subject of fascination for several hundred years. This animation was created before the modern mathematical proof became known, and makes a heroic effort to show what might be understood about the theorem using only computer graphics, ending with a bit of fun at Fermat's expense.

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    Kurt Gödels Philosophical Viewpoint

    20:17

    In his book, “A Logical Journey: from Gödel to Philosophy,” Hao Wang describes how he found a list of 14 philosophical points written by Gödel around the year 1960. Gödel had titled the list, “My Philosophical Viewpoint.” To understand Gödel's strange and magnificent worldview, we will go through each of these 14 points and analyze their greater significance.






    Here are links to sources from the video:














































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    Stephen Wolfram - Is Mathematics Invented or Discovered?

    10:09

    For more videos and information from Stephen Wolfram

    For more videos on whether mathematics is invented or discovered

    To buy episodes and seasons of Closer To Truth click here

    Mathematics describes the real world of atoms and acorns, stars and stairs, with remarkable precision. So is mathematics invented by humans just like chisels and hammers and pieces of music?

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    Godels Lasting Legacy

    4:45

    Austrian logician Kurt Gödel’s incompleteness theorems showed us the limitations of mathematics within mathematics. While math is still useful for proving scientific theorems, Gödel transformed the perception of pure mathematics in a way that still makes modern mathematicians uncomfortable. Here, leading thinkers—a mathematician, a philosopher, and a physicist—wrestle, almost literally, with the implications of Gödel’s legacy.

    Watch the full program here:
    Original program date: June 4, 2010

    The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.

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    Kurt Gödel and the Mathematical Paradox | This Statement is Unprovable

    2:17

    Brief glimpse into Kurt Gödel's incompleteness theorem and the limits to the logical basis of a perfect language system. Text excerpted from Andrew Hodges' wonderful book on Alan Turing.

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    David Deutsch What is Ultimate Reality

    8:57

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    Gödels Incompleteness Theorem - Professor Tony Mann

    6:22

    A short mind-bending trip through the wonderful world of Mathematical Paradoxes: An examination of some recent work on paradoxes by the Austrian-American Mathematician Kurt Gödel. You can watch the full lecture by Professor Tony Mann here:

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    Godels Incompleteness Theorem

    10:09

    Grade 11 Math Project by Murphy

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    Godels Incompleteness Theorem - Intro to Theoretical Computer Science

    2:55

    This video is part of an online course, Intro to Theoretical Computer Science. Check out the course here:

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    Gödels Incompleteness Theorems

    41:58

    In 1900, in Paris, the International Congress of Mathematicians gathered in a mood of hope and fear. The edifice of maths was grand and ornate but its foundations had been shaken. They were deemed to be inconsistent and possibly paradoxical. At the conference, a young man called David Hilbert set out a plan to rebuild the foundations of maths – to make them consistent, all encompassing and without any hint of a paradox. Hilbert was one of the greatest mathematicians that ever lived, but his plan failed spectacularly because of Kurt Gödel. Gödel proved that there were some problems in maths that were impossible to solve, that the bright clear plain of mathematics was in fact a labyrinth filled with potential paradox. In doing so, Gödel changed the way we understand what mathematics is, and the implications of his work in physics and philosophy take us to the very edge of what we can know. Melvyn Bragg discusses Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems with Marcus du Sautoy, Professor of Mathematics at Wadham College, University of Oxford; John Barrow, Professor of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge and Gresham Professor of Geometry and Philip Welch, Professor of Mathematical Logic at the University of Bristol.

    This is from a BBC program called In Our Time. For more information, go to

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    Gödel, Escher, Bach - Lecture 1: Part 1 of 7

    9:30

    During the summer of 2007, Gödel, Escher, Bach was recorded for OpenCourseWare.

    Original Content Location:

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    Hitler against Godels Theorem

    3:50

    Hitler faces the awful truth: arithmetic is incomplete.

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    Godels Incompleteness Theorem

    9:24

    A short description of how Zermelo-Fraenkel Set Theory Avoids Russell's Paradox, but falls into Godel's Incompleteness Theorem.

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    The Most IMPORTANT Video Youll Ever See

    9:18

    5 million views for an old codger giving a lecture about arithmetic?? What's going on? You'll just have to watch to see what's so damn amazing about what he (Albert Bartlett) has to say.

    I introduce this video to my students as Perhaps the most boring video you'll ever see, and definitely the most important. But then again, after watching it most said that if you followed along with what the presenter (a professor emeritus of Physics at Univ of Colorado-Boulder) is saying, it's quite easy to pay attention, because it is so damn compelling.

    Entire playlist for the lecture:

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    Primes and Twin Primes: An Awesome Journey Pt.1 of 4

    14:31

    Part 1 of 4. These videos convey the thought process in discovering several methods to study Prime Numbers. Great visualizations will guide you through the beauty of the primes, while compelling insights will lay a foundation for the Twin Prime Conjecture. Recommended to watch in HD mode. Go to sievesofchaos.com for more information and visualizations.

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    Steven Weinberg - Is Mathematics Invented or Discovered?

    8:42

    Mathematics describes the real world of atoms and acorns, stars and stairs, with remarkable precision. So is mathematics invented by humans just like chisels and hammers and pieces of music?

    Click here to watch more interviews on mathematics and reality

    Click here to watch more interviews with Steven Weinberg

    Click here to buy episodes or complete seasons of Closer To Truth

    For all of our video interviews please visit us at closertotruth.com

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    How to Turn a Sphere Inside Out

    1:38

    will blow your mind

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    Physicist Edward Witten on Mystery Theory - Best Explanation Ever!

    17:08

    Physicist Edward Witten on Mystery Theory - Best Explanation Ever!
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    MIT Godel Escher Bach Lecture 1

    1:2:34

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    Freeman Dyson - Why I dont like the PhD system

    6:57

    American-British physicist and mathematician, Freeman Dyson, was born in England in 1923. Aged 25, he relocated to Cornell University and has become known for his achievements in the fields of solid state physics, nuclear engineering and quantum field theory. [Listener: Sam Schweber]

    TRANSCRIPT: [SS] You stay in Cornell for two years and then you go to the Institute. Do you want to say a few words, besides the experience of meson nucleon scattering at Cornell, about life at the university there, and what made you decide to come to the Institute, to accept an invitation to the Institute in '53?

    Yes. This was a hard choice, because I was spiritually much more at home at Cornell. Cornell is a much warmer place. It's a real community, partly because of Hans. I mean Hans made it like that, but even without Hans - it's a place which commands enormous loyalty. I mean the friends that we made at Cornell 40 years ago, a lot of them are still there. These people just never leave, including Hans himself, who's now been there for 60 years. And so I felt very much at home there and sort of spiritually I still feel more at home in Ithaca than I do in Princeton. So there were these strong forces keeping me at Cornell. Cornell had always been my vision of America, whereas Princeton is not. Princeton is definitely an alien growth in America. Ithaca is the real thing. So from that point of view I would have preferred to stay in Ithaca, and also I love the people there. But I hated the PhD system, and that was what - I felt basically out of tune with the main job I had at Cornell, which was to train PhD students. The whole PhD system to me is an abomination. I don't have a PhD myself, I feel myself very lucky I didn't have to go through it. I think it's a gross distortion of the educational process. What happens when I'm responsible for a PhD student, the student is condemned to work on a single problem in order to write a thesis, for maybe two or three years. But my attention span is much shorter than that. I like to work on something intensively for maybe one year or less, get it done with and then go on to something else. So my style just doesn't fit this PhD cycle. What would happen, a PhD student would want to go on working on a problem for two or three years, but I would lose interest before he was finished. And so there was a basic mismatch between the way I like to do physics and this straightjacket which was imposed on the students. And so I found it was very frustrating, and of course this meson nucleon scattering was a part of that, but it wasn't only the meson nucleon scattering; all the PhD students had these same constraints imposed on them, which I basically disapprove of. I just don't like the system. I think it is an evil system and it has ruined many lives. So that was the down side of Cornell, whereas at Princeton I was offered a job at the Institute for Advanced Study which works on a one year cycle. We have only post docs at this Institute here, so the post docs arrive each year, then they can decide what they want to do. I can collaborate with a post doc for a year, I don't have to keep him fed for the next two or three years after that. So at the end of six months or a year we can say goodbye and I can go and do something else, he can go and do something else if he likes. It's a much more flexible system, and it suits my style much better. So that was a strong reason for coming to Princeton. In addition to that, of course, there was the question of salary, which is never negligible since by that time I had a wife and three kids, and when I arrived at Cornell as a professor, I thought I was rich. I had a salary of $8,000 a year, which to me at that time seemed great wealth. But after living in Ithaca for two years with a wife and three kids, or the third kid just arrived at the end of the time in Ithaca, we found $8,000 dollars wasn't really much, and at Princeton I was offered twelve and a half. So that was a big consideration, that twelve and a half was real wealth, and so that was a good reason to move, and I don't make any bones about that. And in addition, of course, the Institute was a great opportunity. It was something that I had in a way dreamed of, of becoming a professor at the Institute. It carried a certain amount of glory even then, and - anyway, it was an opportunity I couldn't turn down. And I think it did work out for the best for everybody, since my job at Cornell was taken by Ed Salpeter who did magnificently there, and he's still there and he was certainly more appropriate for the job than I was. So I think I did a favour to Cornell by leaving, in a certain way...

    Visit to read the remaining part of the transcript and to view more of Freeman Dyson’s inspiring thoughts and life stories.

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    1/42 Secret History: Part 1 Georg Cantors Mystical Philosophy of Infinity

    14:04

    *** Visit *** This is part 1 of my 42 part series revealing the meaning of life and the mysteries of the universe!

    Parts 1-7 focus on Georg Cantor explaining lots of the details about his philosophy never dealt with before on YouTube!

    Some important links that pertain to this video:

    - to find books mentioned in this video.
    - Dr. Chris Menzel's Paper on Cantor which gets into Plato, paradoxes, etc..
    - Dr. Kai Hauser on Cantorian sets in light of Plato
    - a most fascinating paper by Professor Jerzy Mioduszewski found where Cantor's is sometimes quoted, paraphrased or his ideas and life are presented.
    - paper by Anne Newstead
    - Cantor's English Translation of Contributions to the founding of the theory of transfinite numbers which has much of the philosophy logically purified away but still covers the basic mathematics.

    And finally a book I used heavily for this video:

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    How Einstein, Heisenberg and Gödel Used Constraints to Rethink the Universe, with Janna Levin

    4:51

    If you can't break through a wall, you climb over it. Janna Levin, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Barnard College, points to three genius scientists who embraced limitations. Levin's latest book is Black Hole Blues and Other Songs from Outer Space (

    Read more at BigThink.com:

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    Transcript - I became interested in this phenomenon of constraints inspiring creative outbursts. And if you look at the last century there were three really profound examples of that. I would say the earliest that I found incredibly interesting was the limit of the speed of light leading Einstein to the theory of relativity. Where a lot of other scientists wanted to remove the limit, they wanted to say, 'There is no limit to the speed of light. That doesn't make any sense. That's impossible.' Einstein actually, despite the word relativity, adhered to a very strict absolute. And that absolute was the speed of light. He took that to be his guiding constraint. And by sticking to it rigidly he said, 'I'll give up anything else but the speed of light, the constancy of the speed of light.' And by doing so he gave up on the absolute nature of space and time.

    I mean that's just much harder to let go of intuitively and a much greater violation of our common sense, but it was right. And so this was an example where this tight constraint led to a creative outburst. From this one constraint you could trace the line, not only to the relativity of space and time but the expansion of the universe; the existence of black holes; the ideal that the entire space has a shape, all of these things burgeoned from this really tight constraint.

    Another great example is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. So Heisenberg begins to believe that we can't precisely know the location of a particle and its motion and its momentum. And this seems to violate what we believe that things objectively exist, that there should be no such limit, but he takes it very seriously. He doesn't just say, 'Oh it's often cast in this way; oh disturb a particle when we observe it therefore we can't also know it's momentum once we've located it because in the process of measuring it we've somehow disturbed it.' That's not really true. It's much deeper than that. Read Full Transcript Here:

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    A New Theory of Time - Lee Smolin

    23:43

    Is it possible that time is real, and that the laws of physics are not fixed? Lee Smolin, A C Grayling, Gillian Tett, and Bronwen Maddox explore the implications of such a profound re-think of the natural and social sciences, and consider how it might impact the way we think about surviving the future.

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    Gödels Second Incompleteness Theorem, Proof Sketch

    7:05

    In order for math to prove its own correctness, it would have to be incorrect. This result is Gödel’s second incompleteness theorem, and in this video, we provide a sketch of the proof.

    Created by: Cory Chang
    Produced by: Vivian Liu
    Script Editor: Justin Chen, Brandon Chen, Zachary Greenberg

    Special thanks to Ryan O’Donnell, associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University (

    Twitter:




    Extra Resources:
    Ryan O’Donnell’s slide deck:
    Wikipedia entry:
    Boolean algebra:
    Playlist to previous videos:

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    Gödels Incompleteness - Numberphile

    13:24

    MAIN VIDEO:
    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    Extra footage part 2:

    Professor Marcus du Sautoy is Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford.

    Professor du Sautoy's book as mentioned...
    In the US it is called The Great Unknown -
    In the UK it is called What We Cannot Know -
    More of his books:

    Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI):

    We are also supported by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science.

    NUMBERPHILE
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    Leonard Susskind - Why does mathematics work? - Differential Equations in Action

    5:53

    This video is part of an online course, Differential Equations in Action. Check out the course here:

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    Godel: Key Thinkers at the University of Sydney

    3:25

    KURT GÖDEL AND THE LIMITS OF MATHEMATICS - Professor Mark Colyvan, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science
    Kurt Gödel was one of the foremost mathematicians and logicians of the 20th century. He proved a number of extremely surprising results about the limitations of mathematics. Perhaps the most significant of these is his celebrated incompleteness theorem, which tells us that there are mathematical blind spots: parts of mathematics that traditional methods of proof cannot access. These results are thought by many to have far-reaching consequences for computing and for our understanding of the nature of the human mind. Gödel's results have thus been the subject of a great deal of popular attention. Indeed, few other results in the history of mathematics have had such an impact outside of mathematics. For those of us who have never heard of Gödel, this lecture will give an accessible outline of his work and achievements.

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    A Pattern in Prime Numbers ?

    2:01

    An interesting phenomenon I stumbled upon recently.

    Hope you find it as fascinating as me.

    If there are any mathematicians in the audience who can explain this,
    (in a simple way) feel free to comment.

    (Oh, and yes, I returned the voice to Professor Hawking, but he left me a copy ;)
    ...ok, I made it with speakonia :) )

    Also I made a large rendering of the pattern available for download here:

    (It is the smallest download button on the page...,
    and please let me know when the link expired.)
    Could be a nice poster :) as suggested by user bobbooty.

    Music:

    e-world by zero-project

    is licensed under a Creative Commons license:

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    Soft Powers Narrative: Time of Crisis by Reuters

    10:00

    Reuters presents the prevailing narrative (story) that the public is currently programmed with: Chaos, system failure, despair, and man-against-man. All efforts are afoot in the media to make the story believable.

    What is sought is total system change, including our political systems, our economic systems, societal systems, science and human understanding of nature and our relationship to each other.

    To achieve this tremendous level of change, the public must believe that the system has collapsed, and that we will not survived unless saved. It will be at this time that a United Nations global peace keeper coalition of forces under the benevolent eye of the UN will 'save' us.

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    Maths Existential Crisis

    6:55

    Math isn’t perfect, and math can prove it. In this video, we dive into Gödel’s incompleteness theorems, and what they mean for math.

    Created by: Cory Chang
    Produced by: Vivian Liu
    Script Editors: Justin Chen, Brandon Chen, Elaine Chang, Zachary Greenberg

    Special thanks to Ryan O’Donnell, associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University (

    Twitter:



    Extra Resources:
    Ryan O’Donnell’s slide deck:
    Wikipedia Entry:
    Axiomatic Systems:
    Peano Axioms:
    Principle of Explosion:

    Picture credits:








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    THUNK - 27. Gödel and the Black Hole of Mathematics

    5:19

    Kurt Gödel proved that math has an incurable flaw that will plague it, and us, forever. Learn what it is, and why it has to do with everything from your computer to your brain!

    -Links for the Curious-

    A fantastic blog post detailing how the incompleteness theorem can be logically deduced from the halting problem, and vice-versa -

    A lecture by Stephen Hawking about how Gödel's theorem might contain a central truth of physics, namely its inevitable failure -

    A paper detailing how a human brain isn't immune to the incompleteness theorem's effects -

    Alfred Whitehead and Bertrand Russell's Principia Mathematica, a triumph in mathematical rigor -

    Russell's Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, a fantastic work demonstrating just what sort of thinking was turned upside-down by Gödel's proof -

    Yes, I know that most non-German/Austrian people pronounce it Girdle. That's not quite right; I'm trying to say it closer to how it's pronounced in Gödel's language -

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    Brian Greene interview on String Theory - 2017

    20:49

    An explanation of string theory with physicist, Brian Greene. »»﴿───▻ See more on the Authors Playlist: .







    Subscribe now to ScienceNET! Lawrence Krauss welcomes Brian Greene to the Origins stage for a facinating discussion about String Theory. One of my .

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    Gödels First Incompleteness Theorem, Proof Sketch

    6:20

    Kurt Gödel rocked the mathematical world with his incompleteness theorems. With the halting problems, these proofs are made easy!

    Created by: Cory Chang
    Produced by: Vivian Liu
    Script Editor: Justin Chen

    Special thanks to Ryan O’Donnell, associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University (

    Twitter:



    Extra Resources:
    Ryan O’Donnell’s slide deck:
    Wikipedia entry:
    Rules of deductive calculus:
    Proof that square root of 2 is irrational, in Metamath:
    Mizar system:
    Metamath:
    Playlist to previous videos:

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    Kurt Gödel & the Limits of Mathematics

    45:28

    Kurt Gödel and his famous Incompleteness Theorems are discussed by Mark Colyvan, Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Sydney Centre for the Foundations of Science. This is from Key Thinkers (Sydney Ideas).

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    Programming Humans via Baudrillards System of Objects

    4:57

    Once objects are controlled by the media then humans' emotional association with these objects is also controlled, and can be changed over time in order to modify the public perception of 'reality'. See my other post on Baudrillard.

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    Society Needs Catastrophes - George Poste

    3:46

    Bugs, Bits and Engineering Bioforms: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    (Aired on C-Span May 24, 2010)


    New America Foundation


    Monstanto Board Member & Chief Scientist for the Complex Adaptive Systems Initiative, Arizona St. University, Dr. George Poste gave the keynote address at a forum on military technology and robotics. Afterward, panelists talked about emerging technologies developed for and used by the military and the potential impact of robotics on civilian life. They also responded to questions from the audience.

    @1:02:45 in the full presentation, During Q&A, Poste says:
    I am deeply saddened by what I am going to say. I believe catastrophe is the only way in which an overly complacent comfortable society begins to understand the need to change, and whether it be the rise of tyrants, whether it be atrocity on a more limited scale, such a 9-11, it doesn't matter what the disaster is.

    I serve on the institute of medicine influenzia task force, and just to show you how banal it has all become, the retreat from complexity had a very well groomed member of the administration, who was the equivalent of Brownie from a previous administration, turn up and say, oh, uh we do have to deal with a slight problem, there might not be enough vaccine for the nation at large, but we have the following program laid out except we'll have a 160M doses by the end of October...

    Poste then articulates an example of a political administration incapable of dealing with a complex issue, and the public's ability to comprehend the issue anyway. This thinking regarding Democracy's fitness is in alignment with the primary thesis in the Club of Rome's First Global Revolution, stating....

    Democracy is not a panacea. It cannot organize everything and it is unaware of its own limits. These facts must be faced squarely. Sacrilegious though this may sound, democracy is no longer well suited for the tasks ahead. The complexity and the technical nature of many of today's problems do not always allow elected representatives to make competent decisions at the right time.


    +++

    He also says...
    ...That the curse of contemporary governments is failing Mencken's 1st principle. H.L Mencken said of course every complex problem has got an instant solution ...it is always wrong. [actual quote: there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.]. And that is the issue now that every member of Congress is trapped in. They may be pre-disposed to it, but most importantly they cannot operate outside of it. There is minimal long term capacity to now to think about issues which are best, because they are also highly complex, and complexity has been stripped from the narrative.

    +++

    And goes on to say...
    Do we have enough agility in our political structure, or it is so broken that we will not be able to have sufficient agility in our global governance mechanisms and global commerce to be able to mitigate those?

    +++

    Also See Excerpt from the following Report:
    Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance


    Understanding of the mind and brain will enable the creation of a new species of intelligent machine systems that can generate economic wealth on a scale hitherto unimaginable. Within a half-century, intelligent machines might create the wealth needed to provide food, clothing, shelter, education, medical care, a clean environment, and physical and financial security for the entire world population. Intelligent machines may eventually generate the production capacity to support universal prosperity and financial security for all human beings. Thus, the engineering of the mind is much more than the pursuit of scientific curiosity. It is more even than a monumental technological challenge. It is an opportunity to eradicate poverty and usher in the golden age for all humankind.

    (Indoctrinating children into NBIC 'values' through school. It's well known humans are a lot cheaper than machines... humans repair themselves, and are low mantainance for the first 40 years. With NBIC, they can be upgraded and enhanced.)

    Download Full National Science Foundation Report


    Powerpoint of Report

    In particular, checkout slide #7

    Also See related Video:
    Arming with Intelligence: Data Fusion in Tomorrow's [Today's] Network-Centric Warfare [Internet]

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    Marshall McLuhan: The World is Show Business

    6:32

    You can't have a point of view in the Electronic Age

    ~McLuhan

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    Limits of Logic: The Gödel Legacy

    58:16

    Kurt Gödel showed that mathematical thinking cannot be captured in a formal axiomatic reasoning system. What does this deep result mean in practice? What are the limits of computer thinking? Can beauty and creativity and a sense of humor be formalized?

    Introduction by professor Douglas Hofstadter.

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    Kurt Godel: Is Mathematics Syntax of Langauge

    30:37

    for the audio only of this recording.

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    Construction of Reality - Merchandising Ideas

    10:31

    This is an excerpt from the documentary Evidence Of Revision, Part 5, which introduces the viewer to how social reality is constructed in America today, via control of frames and schemas that impact the perception of its recipients. As Daniel Goleman tells us, reality is nothing more than a set of shared perceptions amongst a given audience.

    Please see The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge by Berger & Luckman for more:


    To Berger and Luckman the world is a Hollywood stage front, but not a delusion. The authors explain that the next generation forgets, or is led to believe, that the social world is given when it was produced or manufactured. But it isn't manufactured mechanistically but is interactively produced. The social order can be maintained by various techniques including intimidation, propaganda, mystification, or the manipulation of symbols. However, man is not a passive, but a reactionary creature that will not merely swallow social reality whole but will also often try and alter it. As the authors state man produces society, society becomes an objective, coercive, and reified (as in deified) reality, and, in turn, man becomes a social product of his own creation. Man experiences alienation when he forgets he created society or when he is powerless to control what he created. Man experiences what is called anomie when social worldviews no longer reflect reality.

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    Godel showed mans systems are inconsistent

    1:31

    Watch the BBC Documentary Dangerous Knowledge, and pay particular attention to the work of Georg Cantor and Kurt Godel. Man's systems are inconsistent, and there are infinite infinities.

    Think of the ramifications of Godel's proofs, published in 1931 and buried.

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    Roger Penrose Is Consciousness an Ultimate Fact?

    34:22

    Is there something special about consciousness? Can our inner subjective experience—the sight of purple, smell of cheese, sound of Bach—ever be explained .

    Is there something special about consciousness? Can our inner subjective experience—the sight of purple, smell of cheese, sound of Bach—ever be explained .

    Is there something special about consciousness? Can our inner subjective experience—the sight of purple, smell of cheese, sound of Bach—ever be explained .

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    John Taylor Gatto - Standardizing People for Greater Profits

    10:16

    A Utopian program was to be created through market research. At the turn of the 20th century, people became standardized and predictable, supporting the mathematical predictions of behavior based upon market research, simplifying demand creation.

    How are people prevented from accessing knowledge that exposes the oppression when these printed legacies must be made available to elite classes and are not easily expunged from the public libraries? For example, such works as Meditations by Marcus Aurelius encompass very dangerous ideas, with passages that say: nothing you can buy is worth having and no body you can boss around with your power is worth associating with.

    To prevent under classes from understanding works of these kind, education systems severely retarded reading comprehension in order to discourage students from being able to understand such works.

    Public universities condition student in to seeking a good job, where exclusive private universities taught a world of independent livelihood. Lincoln said that America will never end up like Europe, because the majority of the public at that time had an independent livelihood, where Europe was based primarily on a proletariat base to support rich industrialists.

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