History of mathematics Lectures

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    History of Mathematics in 50 Minutes

    54:22

    GRCC Mathematics Professor John Dersch reviews many historical innovations in math.

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    MathHistory1a: Pythagoras theorem

    48:55

    Pythagoras' theorem is both the oldest and the most important non-trivial theorem in mathematics.

    This is the first part of the first lecture of a course on the History of Mathematics, by N J Wildberger, the discoverer of Rational Trigonometry. We will follow John Stillwell's text Mathematics and its History (Springer, 3rd ed). Generally the emphasis will be on mathematical ideas and results, but largely without proofs, with a main eye on the historical flow of ideas. A few historical tidbits will be thrown in too...

    In this first lecture (with two parts) we first give a very rough outline of world history from a mathematical point of view, position the work of the ancient Greeks as following from Egyptian and Babylonian influences, and introduce the most important theorem in all of mathematics: Pythagoras' theorem.

    Two interesting related issues are the irrationality of the 'square root of two' (the Greeks saw this as a segment, or perhaps more precisely as the proportion or ratio between two segments, not as a number), and Pythagorean triples, which go back to the Babylonians. These are closely related to the important rational parametrization of a circle, essentially discovered by Euclid and Diophantus. This is a valuable and under-appreciated insight which high school students ought to explicitly see.

    In fact young people learning mathematics should really see more of the history of the subject! The Greeks thought of mathematics differently than we do today, and all students can benefit from a closer appreciation of the difficulties which they saw, but which we today largely ignore.

    This series has now been extended a few times--with more than 35 videos on the History of Mathematics.

    My research papers can be found at my Research Gate page, at I also have a blog at where I will discuss lots of foundational issues, along with other things, and you can check out my webpages at Of course if you want to support all these bold initiatives, become a Patron of this Channel at .

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    Too much Maths, too little History: The problem of Economics

    1:37:11

    This is a recording of the debate hosted by the LSE Economic History Department, in collaboration with the LSESU Economic History Society and the LSESU Economics Society.





    Speakers:
    Proposition Team - Lord Robert Skidelsky & Dr. Ha-Joon Chang
    Opposition Team - Prof. Steve Pisckhe & Prof. Francesco Caselli
    Chair - Professor James Foreman-Peck

    The LSE is currently the only institution to have a separate EH department. We want to encourage students and academics alike to rethink the methodologies used to explain how our world works.

    Do we use the theoretical and econometrical method to create models with assumptions to distil the complexities of human nature and produce measurable results? Or do we use the historical process of considering all factors to provide a more holistic explanation? More importantly, which method should be adopted to better understand increasingly complex economic phenomena in the future?

    We are striving to provide our students breadth that exceeds their current theoretical studies. Hence, whilst we recognise the importance of economic history in allowing us to become closer to the truth and produce more intricate portrayal of events, the significance of models and mathematics remains to be emphasised.

    Indeed, we wish to have this controversially named debate in order to both highlight the tension between the two disciplines and to produce a more nuanced overview in defence of the future of Economics.

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    Vedic Mathematics: My Trip to India to Uncover the Truth - Alex Bellos

    34:00

    One day on YouTube, Alex Bellos saw a video of an amazing mathematical trick. He wanted to know more about this 'Vedic Mathematics', so he got on a plane to India. This is a lecture about his journey that touched on mathematics, mysticism, Indian history, nationalism and culture.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the full conference are available from the on the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.

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    4. Calculus: One of the Most Successful Technologies

    1:42:48

    (October 22, 2012) Professor Keith Devlin discusses how calculus is truly one of the most useful discoveries of all time.

    Originally presented in the Stanford Continuing Studies Program.

    Stanford University:


    Stanford Continuing Studies Program:


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

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    Non-Euclidean Geometry Topics in the History of Mathematics

    24:26

    Another Open University oldie. This one's a bit more hxc (and considerably older - the 1970s public were apparently considered far smarter than we are today!), but it's mostly easy enough to grasp if you put your mind to it.

    Non-Euclidean Geometry is relevant for the Riemann curvature of space-time in General Relativity and all that. It's also interesting to watch logic (or a bearded professor) decimate what was once considered to be a fundamental truth of mathematics and reality, if you're into that sort of thing. (maybe that's a bit over-dramatic).

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    Lecture on Mathematical Logic, From Film

    4:13

    A Scene from (The Oxford Murders 2008) Film where a doctorate student in the field of mathematical philosophy attends a Lecture given by prof. Arthur Seldom which he wants to work with and seeks for his recognition.

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    The surprising beauty of mathematics | Jonathan Matte | TEDxGreensFarmsAcademy

    9:14

    Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel:

    Jonathan Matte has been teaching Mathematics for 20 years, the last 13 at Greens Farms Academy. Formerly the Mathematics Department Chair, he is currently the 12th Grade Dean and Coach of the GFA Math Team and the CT State Champion Quiz Team. A former Jeopardy! contestant, Jon's outside-of-the classroom passions lie in the world of puzzles and games, both as a competitor (in the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament and the World Puzzle Championships, among others) and a creator (orchestrating the long-running GFA Puzzle Hunt and crafting puzzles that have made their way into GAMES Magazine).

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    MathHistory20: Group theory

    58:54

    Here we give an introduction to the historical development of group theory, hopefully accessible even to those who have not studied group theory before, showing how in the 19th century the subject evolved from its origins in number theory and algebra to embracing a good part of geometry.

    Actually the historical approach is a very fine way of learning about the subject for the first time.

    We discuss how group theory enters perhaps first with Euler's work on Fermat's little theorem and his generalization of it, involving arithmetic mod n. We mention Gauss' composition of quadratic forms, and then look at permutations, which played an important role in Lagrange's approach to the problem of solving polynomial equations, and was then taken up by Abel and Galois.

    The example of the symmetric group is at the heart of the subject, and so we examine S_3. In the 19th century groups of transformations became to be intimately tied to symmetries of geometries, with the work of Klein and Lie. A nice example that ties together the algebraic and geometric sides of the subject is the symmetry groups of the Platonic solids.

    If you are interested in supporting my production of high quality math videos, why not consider becoming a Patron of this channel? Here is the link to my Patreon page:

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    The Secret Mathematicians - Professor Marcus du Sautoy

    53:54

    Professor du Sautoy examines the way that Mathematics has overtly and covertly inspired some of the greatest artists. He examines how they might be considered as secret mathematicians:

    From composers to painters, writers to choreographers, the mathematician's palette of shapes, patterns and numbers has proved a powerful inspiration. Artists can be subconsciously drawn to the same structures that fascinate mathematicians as they hunt for interesting new structures to frame their creative process.

    Professor du Sautoy will explore the hidden mathematical ideas that underpin the creative output of well-known artists and reveal that the work of the mathematician is also driven by strong aesthetic values.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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    Surfaces and Topology - Professor Raymond Flood

    57:34

    Topology, sometimes called rubber sheet geometry, is an important and young branch of Maths:

    If we count the number of vertices, v, on a cube, v = 8, number of edges e = 12, and number of faces f = 6, then v¬ -- e + f = 2. The same is true for a tetrahedron where v¬ = 4, e = 6 and f = 4. In fact, the mathematician Leonhard Euler obtained the amazing result that v¬ -- e + f = 2 for a wide class of polyhedrons. This theorem of Euler is a result in topology, a subject which tries to find those properties of geometrical objects that are invariant under continuous deformation -- a tetrahedron can be changed in this way into a cube.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    Maths Degree Lecture: mathematics of codes and code-breaking

    50:19

    What's it like to study Maths at University? Dr James Grime of Cambridge University discusses the fascinating history and mathematics of codes and code-breaking. The lecture includes a demonstration of a genuine World War II Enigma Machine. The lecture formed part of the University of Glamorgan's Annual Sixth Form Maths Lecture 2011.

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    Lecture I - Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science

    1:7:11

    Robert May, Baron May of Oxford; Professor, Zoology, Oxford University and Imperial College
    October 2, 2012

    2012 Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures

    May explores the extent to which beauty has guided, and still guides, humanity's quest to understand how the world works, with a brief look at the interactions among beliefs, values, beauty, truth, and our expectations for tomorrow's world.

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    Eulers Exponentials - Professor Raymond Flood

    50:57

    A thorough examination of the life and work of one of histories greatest mathematicians, the Shakespeare of Numbers, Leonhard Euler:

    Leonhard Euler was the most prolific mathematician of all time. He introduced the symbols e for the exponential number f for a function and i for √-1. He discovered what many mathematicians consider to be the most beautiful expression in mathematics, e ix = cosx + i sinx: a relation connecting the exponential and trigonometric functions. The exponential function and its inverse the logarithm function appear throughout mathematics and its applications, in physics, engineering, mathematical biology, chemistry and economics.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    Mathematics - Multivariable Calculus - Lecture 1

    1:19:50

    Multivariable Calculus
    Instructor: Edward Frenkel

    course website:

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    The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Quantum Physics in Modern Mathematics -- Robbert Dijkgraaf

    59:56

    Robbert Dijkgraaf, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
    March 5th, 2014

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    Mathematics has proven to be unreasonably effective in understanding nature. The fundamental laws of physics can be captured in beautiful formulae. In this lecture I want to argue for the reverse effect: Nature is an important source of inspiration for mathematics, even of the purest kind. In recent years ideas from quantum field theory, elementary particles physics and string theory have completely transformed mathematics, leading to solutions of deep problems, suggesting new invariants in geometry and topology, and, perhaps most importantly, putting modern mathematical ideas in a `natural’ context.
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    visit Perimeter Institute's website to find this and other speakers



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    James Clerk Maxwell: The Greatest Victorian Mathematical Physicists - Professor Raymond Flood

    52:32

    James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) was one of the most important mathematical physicists of all time, after only Newton and Einstein. Within a relatively short lifetime he made enormous contributions to science which this lecture will survey. Foremost among these was the formulation of the theory of electromagnetism with light, electricity and magnetism all shown to be manifestations of the electromagnetic field. He also made major contributions to the theory of colour vision and optics, the kinetic theory of gases and thermodynamics, and the understanding of the dynamics and stability of Saturn's rings.

    This talk was a part of the conference on '19th Century Mathematical Physics', held jointly by Gresham College and the British Society of the History of Mathematics. The transcript and downloadable versions of all of the lectures are available from the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There is currently nearly 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    MathHistory5a: Number theory and algebra in Asia

    49:46

    After the later Alexandrian mathematicians Ptolemy and Diophantus, Greek mathematics went into decline and the focus shifted eastward. This lecture discusses some aspects of Chinese, Indian and Arab mathematics, in particular the interest in number theory: Pell's equation, the Chinese remainder theorem, and algebra. Most crucial was the introduction of the Hindu-Arabic number system that we use today.

    We also discuss the influence of probably the most important problem of the mathematical sciences from a historical point of view: understanding the motion of the night sky, in particular the planets. This motivated work in trigonometry, particularly spherical trigonometry, of both Indian and Arab mathematicians.

    Prominent mathematicians whose work we discuss include Sun Zi, Aryabhata, Brahmagupta, Bhaskara I and II, al-Khwarizmi, al-Biruni and Omar Khayyam.

    If you are interested in supporting my YouTube Channel: here is the link to my Patreon page:
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    The Enigma Code

    1:5:16

    An elementary introduction to the way the famous Enigma code used by the Germans during WWII. David Perry explains some of the history and the mathematics behind the code.
    This is part of an outreach program
    sponsored by NSF-VIGRE at UC Davis.

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    IAS/UPSC History Lecture - From Ancient to Modern History - Anuj Garg Coaching

    1:36:52

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    Session#1 Time And Work

    1:45:28

    Time and Work -Complete Session
    Hello Students
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    The Riemann Hypothesis: How to make $1 Million Without Getting Out of Bed

    1:5:41

    Mathematics is patterns and logic, imagination and rigor. It is a way of seeing and a way of thinking. Math Mornings is a series of public lectures aimed at bringing the joy and variety of mathematics to students and their families. Speakers from Yale and elsewhere will talk about aspects of mathematics that they find fascinating or useful. The talks will usually be accessible to students from 7th grade and up, although occasionally some familiarity with high-school subjects will be helpful.

    Math Mornings lectures will occur on three Sundays each semester at Yale University. The third lecture for the series was given by Yale Mathematics Professor Alex Kontorovich on December 2, 2012 who spoke about The Riemann Hypothesis: How to make $1 Million Without Getting Out of Bed.

    Please see yale.edu/scienceoutreach for further information about Math Mornings and for a list of other free Yale STEM outreach programming and events.

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    MathHistory9: Calculus

    1:00

    Calculus has its origins in the work of the ancient Greeks, particularly of Eudoxus and Archimedes, who were interested in volume problems, and to a lesser extent in tangents. In the 17th century the subject was widely expanded and developed in an algebraic way using also the coordinate geometry of Descartes. This is one of the most important developments in the history of mathematics.

    Calculus has two branches: the differential and integral calculus. The former arose from the study by Fermat of maxima and minima of functions via horizontal tangents.

    The integral calculus computes areas and volumes beyond the techniques of Archimedes. It was developed independently by Newton and Leibnitz, but others contributed too. Newton's focus was on power series, for which differentiation and integration can be done term by term using a formula of Cavalieri, and which gave remarkable new formulas for pi and the circular functions. He had a dynamic view of the subject, motivated in large part by physics.

    Leibnitz was more interested in closed forms, and introduced the notation which we use today. Both used infinitesimals, in the form of differentials.

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    Lec 1 | MIT 18.03 Differential Equations, Spring 2006

    48:56

    The Geometrical View of y'=f(x,y): Direction Fields, Integral Curves.
    View the complete course:

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
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    Senior Lectures: Ralph Abraham - Complex Dynamical Systems

    19:35

    2010 lecture by Ralph Abraham to Ross School Seniors on the history of mathematics leading to the development of Complex Dynamical Systems Theory and the impact that Chaos Theory had on this 'new' branch of mathematics.

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    A Tribute to Euler - William Dunham

    55:08

    A Tribute to Euler

    William Dunham
    Truman Koehler Professor of Mathematics, Muhlenberg College

    Tuesday, October 14, 2008, at 6:00 PM

    Harvard University Science Center, Hall D

    The fall 2008 Clay Public Lecture will be held at Harvard on October 14, in association with the Harvard Mathematics Department. Known for his writings on the history of mathematics, Professor William Dunham will examine the genius of one of the world's most prolific mathematicians in his talk A Tribute to Euler in Hall D of the Harvard Science Center at 6 pm.

    Among history's greatest mathematicians is Leonhard Euler (1707-1783), the Swiss genius who produced an astonishing 25,000 pages of pure and applied mathematics of the very highest quality.

    In this talk, we sketch Euler's life and describe a few of his contributions to number theory, algebra, and other branches of mathematics. Then we examine a particular Eulerian theorem: his simple but beautiful proof that there are as many ways to decompose a whole number as the sum of distinct summands as there are ways to decompose it as the sum of (not necessarily distinct) odd summands.

    Condorcet, in his Eulogy to Euler, wrote that All mathematicians now alive are his disciples. It should be clear to those who attend the Clay Public Lecture that these words are as true today as when they were first set down, over two centuries ago.

    William Dunham, who received his B.S. (1969) from the University of Pittsburgh and his M.S. (1970) and Ph.D. (1974) from Ohio State, is the Truman Koehler Professor of Mathematics at Muhlenberg College. In the fall term of 2008 he is visiting at Harvard University and teaching a course on the work of Leonhard Euler.

    Over the years, he has directed NEH seminars on the history of mathematics and has spoken on historical topics at dozens of U.S. colleges and universities, as well as at the Smithsonian Institution, the Swiss Embassy in Washington, and on NPR's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday.

    In the 1990s, Dunham wrote three books on mathematics and its history: Journey Through Genuis: The Great Theorems of Mathematics (1990), The Mathematical Universe (1994), and Euler: The Master of Us All (1999). In the present millennium, he has written The Calculus Gallery: Masterpieces from Newton to Lebesgue (2005) and edited The Genius of Euler: Reflections on His Life and Work (2007). His expository writing has been recognized by the Mathematical Association of America with the George Pólya Award in 1992, the Trevor Evans Award in 1997, the Lester R. Ford Award in 2006, and the Beckenbach Prize in 2008. The Association of American Publishers designated The Mathematical Universe as the Best Mathematics Book of 1994.

    Our thanks to the Harvard Mathematics Department for hosting this event.



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    LMS Popular Lecture Series 2015, The Mathematics of Randomness, Professor Martin Hairer

    1:4:56

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    IAS DEMO Class International Relations - By Ashish Sir

    1:9:25

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    Time travel: separating science fact from science fiction

    1:13:54

    Is time travel possible? Science fiction has monopolised this question for so long, we thought it was time to investigate what real science has to say. In this lecture which will cover fascinating ideas in physics that lead from Einstein's theories of relativity, Jim Al-Khalili will treat us to a look at dimensions, investigate how we can possibly imagine living in curved space-time, and how this curvature can cause a black hole to be punched in space.

    Borrowing from science fiction, Professor Al-Khalili will also explore the more problematic question of time travel into the past and the paradoxes that arise. And finally, investigate how we could go about constructing a time machine!

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    College Algebra - Lecture 1 - Numbers

    1:19:35

    College Algebra with Professor Richard Delaware - UMKC VSI - Lecture 1 - Numbers. This lecture discusses about set of objects,Natural numbers,Real numbers and how to find distance between two points.

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    Math 176. Math of Finance. Lecture 01.

    1:14:16

    UCI Math 176: Math of Finance (Fall 2014)
    Lec 01. Math of Finance
    View the complete course:
    Instructor: Donald Saari, Ph.D.

    License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA
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    Description: UCI Math 176 covers the following topics: reviewing of tools from probability, statistics, and elementary differential and partial differential equations, concepts such as hedging, arbitrage, Puts, Calls, the design of portfolios, the derivation and solution of the Blac-Scholes, and other equations.

    Recorded on January 7, 2014

    Required attribution: Saari, Donald. Math 176 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 United States License. (

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    Probability and Its Limits - Professor Raymond Flood

    52:50

    Probability is the examination of uncertain processes, but it's useful for far more than games of chance:

    The modern theory of probability is considered to have begun in 1654 with an exchange of letters between Blaise Pascal and Pierre de Fermat, and has developed since then into the discipline which examines uncertain processes. For example, although on tossing a coin you have no idea whether you will obtain heads or tails we know that if you keep doing it then in the long run it is very likely that the proportion of heads will be close to a half. The lecture will discuss this and other examples of random processes e.g. random walks and Brownian motion.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    The Music of the Primes - Marcus du Sautoy

    1:08

    The Music of the Primes
    Marcus du Sautoy, Oxford University
    Thursday, May 8, 2008, at 6:00 pm

    MIT, Compton Laboratories
    Building 26, Room 26-100
    Access via 60 Vassar Street

    Marcus du Sautoy, author of the The Music of the Primes, will discuss the mystery of prime numbers, the history behind the Riemann hypothesis and the ongoing quest to solve it.

    Why did Beckham choose the number 23 shirt? How is 17 the key to the evolutionary survival of a strange species of cicada? Prime numbers are the atoms of arithmetic -- the hydrogen and oxygen of the world of numbers. Despite their fundamental importance to mathematics, they represent one of the most tantalizing enigmas in the pursuit of human knowledge. In 1859, the German mathematician Bernhard Riemann put forward an idea -- a hypothesis -- that seemed to reveal a magical harmony at work in the numerical landscape. A million dollars now await the person who can unravel the mystery of the hidden music that might explain the cacophony of the primes.

    Marcus du Sautoy is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Wadham College. He is author of numerous academic articles and books on mathematics. He has been a visiting Professor at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, the Max Planck Institute in Bonn, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the Australian National University in Canberra.

    Marcus du Sautoy is author of the best-selling popular mathematics book The Music of the Primes published by Fourth Estate in 2003 and translated into 10 languages. It has won two major prizes in Italy and Germany for the best popular science book of the year. His new book Finding Moonshine: A Mathematician's Journey Through Symmetry is also published by Fourth Estate and was released in March 2008.

    Our thanks to the MIT Mathematics Department for hosting this event.



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    From One to Many Geometries - Professor Raymond Flood

    1:2:49

    For 100 years up to the end of the 19th century the study of geometry was completely changed with the development of non-Euclidean geometries and the use of techniques to think of geometries in higher dimensions - a development essential to Einstein in his development of the theory of General Relativity.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently nearly 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    Science Documentary 2016: The Math Mystery Mathematics in Nature and Universe

    53:01

    Science Documentary 2016: The Math Mystery Mathematics in Nature and Universe

    Astrophysicist Mario Livio, along with a colorful cast of mathematicians, physicists, and engineers, follow math from Pythagoras to Einstein and beyond,

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    Mathematical mysteries have challenged humanity's most powerful thinkers and inspired passionate, lifelong obsessions in search of answers. From the ...

    Season 42, Episode 17 - “The Great Math Mystery” An exploration of mathematics, including where it comes from and why it explains the physical

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    The Queen of Mathematics - Professor Raymond Flood

    1:20

    Carl Friedrich Gauss one of the greatest mathematicians, is said to have claimed: Mathematics is the queen of the sciences and number theory is the queen of mathematics. The properties of primes play a crucial part in number theory. An intriguing question is how they are distributed among the other integers. The 19th century saw progress in answering this question with the proof of the Prime Number Theorem although it also saw Bernhard Riemann posing what many think to be the greatest unsolved problem in mathematics - the Rieman Hypothesis.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently nearly 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
    Website:
    Twitter:
    Facebook:

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    Intro to the Philosophy of Mathematics

    35:08

    A good introduction to the philosophy of mathematics by Ray Monk. He considers the issue of the nature of mathematical truth, what mathematics is actually about, and discusses the views of Plato, Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, Frege and Bertrand Russell...
    What are numbers? What is mathematics actually about? Is it something discovered or is it something constructed by the mind? From the time of Plato onward, people have regarded mathematical truth as an ideal. Unlike ordinary, empirical truth, mathematical truth seems necessary, eternal, incorrigible, and absolutely certain. This talk considers some of the ways in which philosophers have tried to account for the special nature of mathematical truth.

    Ray Monk is a British philosopher well known for his writings on Wittgenstein, Bertrand Russell, and the physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer.

    This talk is part of the Philosophy Cafe series given at the University of Southampton.

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    History of Mathematics

    7:05

    WEBSITE:

    An animated movie on the development of numbers throughout history.

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    The magic of Vedic math - Gaurav Tekriwal

    9:45

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    There is more than one way to reach a correct answer in mathematics. Vedic math, an ancient Indian method, sidesteps traditional computations in a manner that provides a shortcut, while being fun to use and to learn. At TEDYouth 2012, to ooh's and aah's from the amazed crowd, Gaurav Tekriwal demonstrates the magic of Vedic math.

    Talk by Gaurav Tekriwal.

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    IMA Public Lectures: How financial engineering can solve a problem; Andrew W. Lo

    1:21

    Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) Public Lecture Series


    How financial engineering can cure cancer, solve the energy crisis, and stop global warming
    7:00pm, Tuesday, September 21, 2010, Willey Hall 175
    Andrew W. Lo (Harris & Harris Group Professor of Finance, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    As disruptive as the financial crisis has been, the important lessons to be learned from the spectacular failure of financial technologies gone awry may actually pave the way for some of the most significant achievements of the 21st century. In this talk, Prof. Lo will provide a brief overview of the origins of the crisis, the key role that mathematics played, and how a deeper understanding of human nature may allow financial engineers to focus the enormous power of global financial markets on some of society's most pressing challenges.

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    Did Ancient Indians had Amazing Scientific Knowledge Already of 1000s of Years ago?

    13:23

    Official Facebook Page of the Speaker Click Here - !

    Did Ancient Indians had Amazing Scientific Knowledge Already of 1000s of Years ago?

    Knowledge of science was known from very ancient times, although science, as we know today, was not known in India till modern times. The archaeological remains of the Indus Valley reveal knowledge of applied sciences. Scientific techniques were used in irrigation, Metallurgy, making of fired bricks and pottery, and simple recknowing and measurement of areas and volumes.

    It contrast more is know about Aryan achievements in the field of astronomy, mathamatcis and medicine. Chinese records indicate knowledge of a dozen books of Indian origin. Brahmagupta's Sidhanta as well as Charaka's and Susrata's Samhitas were translated int Arabic in the 9th or 10th centuries A.D.

    In ancient Indian mathematics was known by the general name of ganita, which included arthimatcs, geometry, algebra, astronomy and astrology. It was Aryabhata, who gave a new direction to trigonometry. The decimal system too was an innovation of India.

    By the third century B.C. mathematics, astronomy and medicine began to develop separately. In the fielf of mathematics ancient Indians made three distinct contributions, the notation system, the decimal system and the use of zero. The earliest epigraphic evidence of the use of decimal system belongs to the fifth century A.D. Before these numerals appeared in the West they had been used in India for centuries. They are found in the inscriptions of Ashoka in the third century B.C.

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    Introduction to Higher Mathematics - Lecture 17: Rings and Fields

    28:51

    Building on the idea of groups, this lecture explores the structures called rings and fields, beginning to more closely resemble the number systems we work with every day.

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    Class 10th-Maths Online Video Lectures-Quadratic Equations

    7:41

    Aakash iTutor: Class 10th Mathematics Video Lectures (Quadratic Equations: Nature of roots) to study through online coaching tablet by Aakash Institute.

    Enquire for Full Video-Lectures @ ( and prepare for NTSE and Board Exams. The full video covers topics related to Polynomials, quadratic polynomial, quadratic equations, standard form of a quadratic equation, factorisation, solution of a quadratic equation, zeroes, zeroes of a quadratic equation, factors, linear factors, completing the square method, nature of roots, discriminant, quadratic formula, distinct real roots, equal and real roots, no real roots, factorisation by splitting the middle term, roots of a quadratic equation, graph of a quadratic polynomial, maximum value of a quadratic polynomial, minimum value of a quadratic polynomial and parabola.)

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    Ghosts of Departed Quantities: Calculus and its Limits - Professor Raymond Flood

    56:31

    In 1734 Bishop Berkeley published a witty and effective attack on the foundations of the calculus as developed by Newton and Leibniz. But it took nearly 90 years for the calculus to be given a rigorous foundation through the work of the prolific mathematician, Augustin-Louis Cauchy, who formalised the concept of a limit and created the specialism now called analysis.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There is currently over 1,300 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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    A History of Mathematics in Non-Western Cultures

    1:7:27

    A History of Mathematics in Non-Western Cultures

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    Class 9th-Maths Online Coaching Video Lectures-Triangles

    8:29

    Aakash iTutor: Class 9th Mathematics Video Lectures [Triangles: Inequalities in a triangle (Sum of two sides is greater than the third side)] to study through online coaching tablet by Aakash Institute. Enquire for Full Video-Lectures @ ( and prepare for NTSE and Board Exams.

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    Class 10-Maths Online Video Lectures-Introduction to Trigonometry

    5:19

    Aakash iTutor: Class 10th Mathematics Video Lectures (Introduction to Trigonometry: Angle) to study through online coaching tablet by Aakash Institute.

    Enquire for Full Video-Lectures @ ( and prepare for NTSE and Board Exams. (The full video lecture covers topics related to trigonometric ratios, trigonometric ratios of complementary angles, trigonometric identities, angle, right triangle, hypotenuse, base, height, sine of an angle, cosine of an angle, tangent of an angle, cosecant of an angle, secant of an angle and cotangent of an angle.)

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    A mathematicians view on symmetry

    54:37

    This is first of the History of Mathematics Lecture series organized by Vista Foundation's Centre for advanced study Bangalore. Speaker: prof Ravi S Kulkarni of Bhaskaracharya Pratishthana PUNE.

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    Einsteins General Theory of Relativity | Lecture 1

    1:38:28

    Lecture 1 of Leonard Susskind's Modern Physics concentrating on General Relativity. Recorded September 22, 2008 at Stanford University.

    This Stanford Continuing Studies course is the fourth of a six-quarter sequence of classes exploring the essential theoretical foundations of modern physics. The topics covered in this course focus on classical mechanics. Leonard Susskind is the Felix Bloch Professor of Physics at Stanford University.

    Stanford Continuing Studies:


    About Leonard Susskind:


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

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    Class 9th-Maths Online Video Lectures-Herons Formula

    6:40

    Aakash iTutor: Class 9th Mathematics Video Lectures (Heron's Formula: Area of triangle using Heron's Formula) to study through online coaching tablet by Aakash Institute. Enquire for Full Video-Lectures @ ( and prepare for NTSE and Board Exams.

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