History of mathematics Lectures


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    The Map of Mathematics

    11:06

    The entire field of mathematics summarised in a single map! This shows how pure mathematics and applied mathematics relate to each other and all of the sub-topics they are made from.

    If you would like to buy a poster of this map, they are available here:

    I have also made a version available for educational use which you can find here:

    To err is to human, and I human a lot. I always try my best to be as correct as possible, but unfortunately I make mistakes. This is the errata where I correct my silly mistakes. My goal is to one day do a video with no errors!

    1. The number one is not a prime number. The definition of a prime number is a number can be divided evenly only by 1, or itself. And it must be a whole number GREATER than 1. (This last bit is the bit I forgot).

    2. In the trigonometry section I drew cos(theta) = opposite / adjacent. This is the kind of thing you learn in high school and guess what. I got it wrong! Dummy. It should be cos(theta) = adjacent / hypotenuse.

    3. My drawing of dice is slightly wrong. Most dice have their opposite sides adding up to 7, so when I drew 3 and 4 next to each other that is incorrect.

    4. I said that the Gödel Incompleteness Theorems implied that mathematics is made up by humans, but that is wrong, just ignore that statement. I have learned more about it now, here is a good video explaining it:

    5. In the animation about imaginary numbers I drew the real axis as vertical and the imaginary axis as horizontal which is opposite to the conventional way it is done.

    Thanks so much to my supporters on Patreon. I hope to make money from my videos one day, but I’m not there yet! If you enjoy my videos and would like to help me make more this is the best way and I appreciate it very much.

    Here are links to some of the sources I used in this video.

    Links:
    Summary of mathematics:
    Earliest human counting:
    First use of zero:
    First use of negative numbers:
    Renaissance science:
    History of complex numbers:
    Proof that pi is irrational:
    and

    Also, if you enjoyed this video, you will probably like my science books, available in all good books shops around the work and is printed in 16 languages. Links are below or just search for Professor Astro Cat. They are fun children's books aimed at the age range 7-12. But they are also a hit with adults who want good explanations of science. The books have won awards and the app won a Webby.

    Frontiers of Space:
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    Solar System App:

    Find me on twitter, instagram, and my website:



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    Kurt Godel: The Worlds Most Incredible Mind

    15:00

    Kurt Godel: The World's Most Incredible Mind.

    Either mathematics is too big for the human mind or the human mind is more than a machine ~ Godel

    Kurt Godel (1931) proved two important things about any axiomatic system rich enough to include all of number theory.

    1) You'll never be able to prove every true result..... you'll never be able to prove every result that is true in your system.

    2) Godel also proved that one of the results that you can never prove is the result that says that the system is consistent. More precisely: You cannot prove the consistency of any mathematical system rich enough to include the known theory of numbers.

    Hence, any consistent mathematical system that is rich enough to include number theory is inherently incomplete.

    Second, one of the propositions whose truth or falsity cannot be proved within the system is precisely the proposition that states that the system is consistent.

    What Godel's proof means, then, is that we can't prove that arithmetic—let alone any more-complicated system—is consistent.

    For 2000 years, mathematics has been the model—the subject—that convinces us that certainty is possible. Yet Now there's no certainty anywhere—not even in mathematics.

    More...


    Goedel's Ontological Proof.

    For those interested in a discussion of Goedel's reasoning for God, then I suggest starting with this heavily annotated work, which I recently stumbled upon.

    scribd.com/doc/95364925/Goedel-s-God-Proof-Annotated-Version

    It's not that God is subject to the Freedom Proof or the Doubt Proof.
    According to Gödel, He's not. But we have to be, or else we are not free. So
    our truth game with God turns into something like Feynman had described.
    Feynman's Gods, every time physicists think they have the rules of the game
    figured out, throw in a new wrinkle. They let people like Feynman make
    progress, but if the Feynmans of the world learn too much, physics will stop
    being the joy and challenge that it is. The Gods don't let that happen.

    Gödel's God has to be very careful about how he lets our universe unfold.
    If the world becomes totally controllable and comprehensible, we'll be God.
    God does not object to that. In fact, according to Gödel, that is our destiny.
    But it is also the end of us as free human beings. And human freedom is an
    essential part of the beauty of God's universe.

    ~ page 251

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    David Letterman Mathematics Genius Prodigy Daniel Tammet Math 3.14 Pi Day

    8:14

    David Letterman Mathematics Prodigy Genius Daniel Tammet Math 3.14 Pi Day

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    How to trick your math teacher

    7:00

    For more cool Tricks Visit my Website :

    This is an amazing magic trick with the numbers, no preparation needed, can be performed anywhere any time, is very effective but easy. I am loving this trick and I am sure you are gona love it too. Watch it !!!! have fun fooling your friends, By Tricklandia

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    Mathematics and sex | Clio Cresswell | TEDxSydney

    13:02

    Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel:

    Mathematics and sex are deeply intertwined. From using mathematics to reveal patterns in our sex lives, to using sex to prime our brain for certain types of problems, to understanding them both in terms of the evolutionary roots of our brain, Dr Clio Cresswell shares her insight into it all.

    Dr Clio Cresswell is a Senior Lecturer in Mathematics at The University of Sydney researching the evolution of mathematical thought and the role of mathematics in society. Born in England, she spent part of her childhood on a Greek island, and was then schooled in the south of France where she studied Visual Art. At eighteen she simultaneously discovered the joys of Australia and mathematics, following on to win the University Medal and complete a PhD in mathematics at The University of New South Wales. Communicating mathematics is her field and passion. Clio has appeared on panel shows commenting, debating and interviewing; authored book reviews and opinion pieces; joined breakfast radio teams and current affair programs; always there highlighting the mathematical element to our lives. She is author of Mathematics and Sex.

    TEDxSydney is an independently organised event licensed from TED by longtime TEDster, Remo Giuffré (REMO General Store) and organised by his General Thinking network of fellow thinkers and other long time collaborators.

    TEDxSydney has become the leading platform and pipeline for the propagation of Australian ideas, creativity, innovation and culture to the rest of the world.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    History of Mathematics

    7:05

    WEBSITE:

    An animated movie on the development of numbers throughout history.

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    The surprising beauty of mathematics | Jonathan Matte | TEDxGreensFarmsAcademy

    9:14

    Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel:

    Jonathan Matte has been teaching Mathematics for 20 years, the last 13 at Greens Farms Academy. Formerly the Mathematics Department Chair, he is currently the 12th Grade Dean and Coach of the GFA Math Team and the CT State Champion Quiz Team. A former Jeopardy! contestant, Jon's outside-of-the classroom passions lie in the world of puzzles and games, both as a competitor (in the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament and the World Puzzle Championships, among others) and a creator (orchestrating the long-running GFA Puzzle Hunt and crafting puzzles that have made their way into GAMES Magazine).

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    BBC - History of Indian Mathematics Part-1 of 2

    10:03

    Part-2:

    Marcus du Sautoy looks at the contribution of Ancient Indians like Aryabhata, Brahmagupta, Bhaskara, Madhava, etc in the field of Mathematics.

    Programme: BBC - The Story of Maths
    Presenter: Marcus du Sautoy

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    Fast Math Tricks - How to multiply 2 digit numbers up to 100 - the fast way!

    6:27

    How to multiply 2 digit numbers numbers up to 100 - calculating the fast way!
    Using this method you will be able to multiply any pair of two digit numbers with each other - faster than a calculator! Become a math genius in no time at all using vedic math!

    To see how to multiply 2 and 3 digits using a variation of this trick follow this link:

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    The history of our world in 18 minutes | David Christian

    17:41

    Backed by stunning illustrations, David Christian narrates a complete history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the Internet, in a riveting 18 minutes. This is Big History: an enlightening, wide-angle look at complexity, life and humanity, set against our slim share of the cosmic timeline.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at

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    Steven Weinberg - Is Mathematics Invented or Discovered?

    8:42

    Mathematics describes the real world of atoms and acorns, stars and stairs, with remarkable precision. So is mathematics invented by humans just like chisels and hammers and pieces of music?

    Click here to watch more interviews on mathematics and reality

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    Prime Spirals - Numberphile

    9:06

    Prime numbers, Ulam Spirals and other cool numbery stuff with Dr James Grime.
    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    James Clewett on spirals at:

    And more to come soon...

    * subscribing to numberphile does not really change your physical appearance!

    And golden line in this context was made up by Brady!

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    Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics 2014

    2:30

    Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics 2014 recipients talking about mathematics

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    Stephen Wolfram - Is Mathematics Invented or Discovered?

    10:09

    For more videos and information from Stephen Wolfram

    For more videos on whether mathematics is invented or discovered

    To buy episodes and seasons of Closer To Truth click here

    Mathematics describes the real world of atoms and acorns, stars and stairs, with remarkable precision. So is mathematics invented by humans just like chisels and hammers and pieces of music?

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    The Uncracked Problem with 33 - Numberphile

    8:29

    33 is the lowest unsolved problem in the world of summing three cubes. But 30 was also a tough nut to crack!
    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    Featuring Tim Browning from the University of Bristol.

    Taxi Cab Numbers:
    Fermat's Last Theorem:

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    Calculus: What Is It?

    46:17

    This video shows how calculus is both interesting and useful. Its history, practical uses, place in mathematics and wide use are all covered. If you are wondering why you might want to learn calculus, start here!

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    9.999... really is equal to 10

    14:46

    Is it possible to explain that 9.999... = 10 in a way that convinces 99.999...% of all the people in the audience? With the help of some clueless participants of the reality show Total Drama Island the Mathologer gives this math communication challenge his best shot.

    Enjoy!

    Burkard Polster and Giuseppe Geracitano

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    快速數學 Easy Speed Math they Dont Teach You in School - Part 1 - Addition

    17:00

    A different way of doing math at a much faster speed than those that they teach you in School. Its slow in the beginning but get very interesting when it comes to multiplications and squaring beginning part 3 ~ part 5.

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    Leonard Susskind - How Many Universes Exist?

    11:28

    More than one universe? It's a ridiculous question no more. How could multiple universes be generated, and can we ever find evidence, one way or another, for their actual existence?

    Click here for more interviews with Leonard Susskind

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    For all of our video interviews please visit us at closertotruth.com

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    The beauty I see in algebra: Margot Gerritsen at TEDxStanford

    13:20

    Margot Gerritsen is a professor of energy resources engineering and the director of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. After receiving her master's degree in applied mathematics in the Netherlands, Gerritsen moved to the United States in search of hillier and sunnier places. She received her doctorate in scientific computing and computational mathematics at Stanford, and later became a faculty member at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. Gerritsen specializes in renewable and fossil energy production and in computational mathematics. She is also active in coastal ocean dynamics and yacht design.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    TEDxManhattanBeach - John Bennett - Why Math Instruction Is Unnecessary

    11:50

    Talk title: Why math instruction is unnecessary

    John is a teacher of math and a homeschooling parent who offers a radical-sounding proposal: that we cease to require math instruction in middle and high school. He came to this point of view over a number of years, as he attempted (and failed) to convince students that the math they were learning was beautiful, useful, or an imperative component of their future prosperity. When he stopped trying to connect math with students and simple tried to connect with the students themselves, he made a profound discovery - kids are suffering from math anxiety. If the goal of teaching math is to teach us deductive and inductive reasoning, might games and puzzles be equally effective in developing kids' reasoning skills - and allow them to fulfill their life missions? We want to reawaken analytical and critical thinking schools that have been anesthetized by the standard curriculum, says John.

    John Bennett is a math teacher in the San Francisco Bay Area and a home-schooling father of four. An outspoken advocate of education reform, he has presented lectures and workshops throughout California. He uses logic puzzles and strategy games in the classroom (and at home) to supplement the traditional mathematics curriculum. John has written three volumes of Pentagrid Puzzles, a new puzzle form he created to challenge deductive logic and visual-spatial reasoning.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is called TEDxManhattanBeach, where x = independently organized TED event. At our TEDxManhattanBeach event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events, including ours, are self-organized.

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    Prof Béla Bollobás , explains the significance of Indian mathematician Ramanujan

    13:43

    Trinity Fellow, Professor Béla Bollobás, explains the significance of Indian mathematician Ramanujan on the release of The Man Who Knew Infinity. Courtesy: BBC Look East

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    Leonard Susskind - Why does mathematics work? - Differential Equations in Action

    5:53

    This video is part of an online course, Differential Equations in Action. Check out the course here:

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    Eclipses Throughout Our Universe | Out There | Solar Eclipse 2017

    4:49

    On the 21st day of August, 2017, the moon will slide between the Earth and the sun, painting a swath of darkness across North America. The Great American Solar Eclipse.

    Subscribe on YouTube: 

    An exercise in cosmic geometry. A reminder that we live on one sphere among many, all moving to the laws of Kepler, Newton and Einstein. The moon’s orbit around the Earth is slightly tilted, so the shadow of the new moon usually passes above or below us. About twice a year, the three bodies briefly align, and the moon’s long shadow cuts across our planet. The day dies and is reborn. The sun is replaced by an inky hole, feathered with the pale corona, a million degrees hotter than the sun itself. Staring up into the cone of blackness you can feel the cosmic gears grinding. Two minutes of beauty and terror.

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    The Worlds Best Mathematician - Numberphile

    10:57

    (*) Among current mathematicians, many people regard Professor Tao as the world's finest... Opinions on such things vary, of course.
    Professor Tao kindly fielded some of our questions, including many submitted by Numberphile viewers.

    EXTRA FOOTAGE: (and more extras to come)

    The Legend of Question Six:
    Professor Tao's blog:

    Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI):

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    Creating Your Online Course Outline and Schedule

    9:54

    This video takes you through how to use a template, academic calendar and curriculum (CARP) document to build a course outline and schedule. It's used during Week One of the Online and Hybrid Certification Course.

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    What is the basic building block of all mathematics?

    16:41

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    GRCC | Radiologic Technology

    3:02

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    Five Principles of Extraordinary Math Teaching | Dan Finkel | TEDxRainier

    14:42

    In this perspective-expanding and enjoyable talk, Dan Finkel invites us to approach learning and teaching math with courage, curiosity, and a sense of play.

    Dan Finkel wants everyone to have fun with math. After completing his Ph.D. in algebraic geometry at the University of Washington, he decided that teaching math was the most important contribution he could make to the world. He has devoted much of his life to understanding and teaching the motivation, history, aesthetics, and deep structure of mathematics.

    Dan is the Founder and Director of Operations of Math for Love, a Seattle-based organization devoted to transforming how math is taught and learned. A teacher of teachers and students, Dan works with schools, develops curriculum, leads teacher workshops, and gives talks on mathematics and education throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

    Dan is one of the creators of Prime Climb, the beautiful, colorful, mathematical board game. He contributes regularly to the New York Times Numberplay blog and hosts Seattle’s Julia Robinson Math Festival annually. In his spare time he performs improv comedy in Seattle.


    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

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    Leonard Susskind: My friend Richard Feynman

    14:42

    What's it like to be pals with a genius? Onstage at TEDxCaltech, physicist Leonard Susskind spins a few stories about his friendship with the legendary Richard Feynman, discussing his unconventional approach to problems both serious and ... less so.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the Sixth Sense wearable tech, and Lost producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at

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    Student Life 2017

    4:22

    Join Student Life at GRCC!

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    The Chaos Theory, Unraveling the Mystery of Life | Samuel Won | TEDxDaculaHighSchool

    21:10

    Discussing how chaos paradoxically leads to formal structure and order, Samuel Won describes how the the Chaos Theory can shine light on many of the world's most unexplainable happenings. Also, Samuel Won delves into the Butterfly Effect in order to distinguish the real-world effects of the Chaos Theory.

    Samuel Won is a student currently enrolled in Dacula High School. Competitive and fun, Samuel has participated in numerous academic events, winning the Honors Gold Medal for Speech in the State Academic Decathlon. As the current leader of the Dacula High School's Orchestra and String Quartet and organizer at his local art organization, Samuel shows a slice of love for the arts. Furthermore, he contains a passion about philosophy and semantics. Finding meaning and purpose within the weirdest of things and then sharing it is what Sam loves most.

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

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    How learning German taught me the link between maths and poetry | Harry Baker | TEDxVienna

    15:32

    In mathematics there are right answers. In poetry there are no wrong ones. Find out how learning a foreign language, especially one that can be as beautifully logical as German, taught World Slam Poetry Slam Champion Harry Baker the two were a lot more linked than he realised.

    More information on

    Poet and Mathematician Harry Baker has always had a love of language, and his work has taken him around the world and exposed him to many voices and languages used to express those voices. Living in Germany was no different!

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

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    Ricci Flow - Numberphile

    14:41

    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    Ricci Flow was used to finally crack the Poincaré Conjecture. It was devised by Richard Hamilton but famously employed by Grigori Perelman in his acclaimed proof. It is named after mathematician Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro.

    In this video it is discussed by James Isenberg from the University of Oregon (filmed here at MSRI).

    Poincaré Conjecture:
    Extras from this interview:

    With thanks to Uwe F Mayer.

    Support us on Patreon:

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    Armen Awards 2014 | Krajewski

    2:09

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    Margot Gerritsen on Linear Algebra - the incredible beauty of math

    23:30

    Margot Gerritsen (Stanford Computational Math) on Linear Algebra: the incredible beauty of a branch of math with a bad reputation at a USF LASER - with special thanks to Tim Davis and his beautiful matrix collection (see )

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    Non-Euclidean Geometry Topics in the History of Mathematics

    24:26

    Another Open University oldie. This one's a bit more hxc (and considerably older - the 1970s public were apparently considered far smarter than we are today!), but it's mostly easy enough to grasp if you put your mind to it.

    Non-Euclidean Geometry is relevant for the Riemann curvature of space-time in General Relativity and all that. It's also interesting to watch logic (or a bearded professor) decimate what was once considered to be a fundamental truth of mathematics and reality, if you're into that sort of thing. (maybe that's a bit over-dramatic).

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    The Birth Of Calculus

    24:44

    A documentary on Leibniz and the calculus.

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    History of Mathematics

    29:38

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    MathHistory1a: Pythagoras theorem

    48:55

    Pythagoras' theorem is both the oldest and the most important non-trivial theorem in mathematics.

    This is the first part of the first lecture of a course on the History of Mathematics, by N J Wildberger, the discoverer of Rational Trigonometry. We will follow John Stillwell's text Mathematics and its History (Springer, 3rd ed). Generally the emphasis will be on mathematical ideas and results, but largely without proofs, with a main eye on the historical flow of ideas. A few historical tidbits will be thrown in too...

    In this first lecture (with two parts) we first give a very rough outline of world history from a mathematical point of view, position the work of the ancient Greeks as following from Egyptian and Babylonian influences, and introduce the most important theorem in all of mathematics: Pythagoras' theorem.

    Two interesting related issues are the irrationality of the 'square root of two' (the Greeks saw this as a segment, or perhaps more precisely as the proportion or ratio between two segments, not as a number), and Pythagorean triples, which go back to the Babylonians. These are closely related to the important rational parametrization of a circle, essentially discovered by Euclid and Diophantus. This is a valuable and under-appreciated insight which high school students ought to explicitly see.

    In fact young people learning mathematics should really see more of the history of the subject! The Greeks thought of mathematics differently than we do today, and all students can benefit from a closer appreciation of the difficulties which they saw, but which we today largely ignore.

    This series has now been extended a few times--with more than 35 videos on the History of Mathematics.

    My research papers can be found at my Research Gate page, at I also have a blog at where I will discuss lots of foundational issues, along with other things, and you can check out my webpages at Of course if you want to support all these bold initiatives, become a Patron of this Channel at .

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    The Nature of Mathematics: Michael Randy Gabel at TEDxGeorgeMasonU

    21:35

    Talk given at TEDxGeorgeMasonU, April 6th 2013.
    Read full bios and event information at TEDxGeorgeMasonU.com

    Dr. Michael Randy Gabel is an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Integrative Studies in George Mason University's New Century College. He received a B.S. in Mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Brandeis University. Professor Gabel's career at GMU spans nearly 35 years. His TEDx talk compares the nature & structure of mathematics to music. He then goes on to discuss how math is usually lost on most people in school.

    TEDxGeorgeMasonU
    Curator: Joe Renaud (@JoePRenaud).
    Filming: GMU TV and Adam Scott.
    Production Manager: Jessica Teaford (@jessicateaford).
    TEDxGeorgeMasonU Team: Andrew Hawkins, Kathleen Wills, AZ Zeller, Brittny Steward, and Myurajan Rubaharan.
    Major Sponsors: GMU Office of Student Scholarship, and GMU Office of the Provost.


    About TEDx:
    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    The hardest integral on YouTube,

    31:09

    He did the derivative!!! Check out Fematika's



    integral of cube root of tan(x), integral of (tan(x))^(1/3),
    the real hardest integral,
    the integral you haven't seen before,
    integral with all techniques,
    super crazy integral,


    math for fun,
    blackpenredpen

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    What We Still Dont Know: Are We Real?

    48:29

    Series from Channel 4 featuring Sir Martin Rees.

    There is a fundamental chasm in our understanding of ourselves, the universe, and everything. To solve this, Sir Martin takes us on a mind-boggling journey through multiple universes to post-biological life. On the way we learn of the disturbing possibility that we could be the product of someone elses experiment.

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    Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell

    42:14

    What if we could find one single equation that explains every force in the universe? Dr. Michio Kaku explores how physicists may shrink the science of the Big Bang into an equation as small as Einstein's e=mc^2. Thanks to advances in string theory, physics may allow us to escape the heat death of the universe, explore the multiverse, and unlock the secrets of existence. While firing up our imaginations about the future, Kaku also presents a succinct history of physics and makes a compelling case for why physics is the key to pretty much everything.

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    Kaku's latest book is The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind (

    The Universe in a Nutshell: The Physics of Everything
    Michio Kaku, Henry Semat Professor of Theoretical Physics at CUNY


    The Floating University
    Originally released September, 2011.

    Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Kathleen Russell, and Elizabeth Rodd

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    Vedic Mathematics: My Trip to India to Uncover the Truth - Alex Bellos

    34:00

    One day on YouTube, Alex Bellos saw a video of an amazing mathematical trick. He wanted to know more about this 'Vedic Mathematics', so he got on a plane to India. This is a lecture about his journey that touched on mathematics, mysticism, Indian history, nationalism and culture.

    The transcript and downloadable versions of the full conference are available from the on the Gresham College website:


    Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.

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    How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking

    47:52

    The maths we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. Jordan Ellenberg shows how wrong this view is through stories that show the power of mathematical thinking.

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    Maths touches everything we do, allowing us to see the hidden structures beneath the messy and chaotic surface of our daily lives. Maths is the science of not being wrong, worked out through centuries of hard work and argument.

    Jordan Ellenberg is a professor of Mathematics at University of Wisconsin, and the 'Do the Math' columnist at Slate. His book 'How not to be wrong: The hidden mathematics of everyday life' was be published in June 2015.

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    Q&A - Birth of a Theorem - with Cédric Villani

    24:19

    Is there still room for an individual genius in modern mathematics? Is the blackboard still the best tool for explaining maths? How should education be changed to promote greater creativity?
    Cédric Villani answers questions following his talk. Watch the main talk here:

    Where does a mathematician’s inspiration come from? Fields Medal winner Cédric Villani takes us on a fantastical adventure through the beautiful, mysterious world of mathematics.
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    What goes on inside the mind of a mathematician? Where does inspiration come from? Fields Medal winner Cédric Villani combines passion and imagination to take us on a fantastical adventure through the beautiful, mysterious world of mathematics.

    Cédric Villani is a French Mathematician who was awarded the prestigious Fields Medal in 2010 - an award often viewed as the highest honour a mathematician can receive.

    He is also a member of the Science and Technology Advisory Council and stands out for his sense of fashion.

    If you're in London, find out what's on at the Ri:

    This event was filmed at the Ri on 9 March 2015.

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    A Tribute to Euler - William Dunham

    55:08

    A Tribute to Euler

    William Dunham
    Truman Koehler Professor of Mathematics, Muhlenberg College

    Tuesday, October 14, 2008, at 6:00 PM

    Harvard University Science Center, Hall D

    The fall 2008 Clay Public Lecture will be held at Harvard on October 14, in association with the Harvard Mathematics Department. Known for his writings on the history of mathematics, Professor William Dunham will examine the genius of one of the world's most prolific mathematicians in his talk A Tribute to Euler in Hall D of the Harvard Science Center at 6 pm.

    Among history's greatest mathematicians is Leonhard Euler (1707-1783), the Swiss genius who produced an astonishing 25,000 pages of pure and applied mathematics of the very highest quality.

    In this talk, we sketch Euler's life and describe a few of his contributions to number theory, algebra, and other branches of mathematics. Then we examine a particular Eulerian theorem: his simple but beautiful proof that there are as many ways to decompose a whole number as the sum of distinct summands as there are ways to decompose it as the sum of (not necessarily distinct) odd summands.

    Condorcet, in his Eulogy to Euler, wrote that All mathematicians now alive are his disciples. It should be clear to those who attend the Clay Public Lecture that these words are as true today as when they were first set down, over two centuries ago.

    William Dunham, who received his B.S. (1969) from the University of Pittsburgh and his M.S. (1970) and Ph.D. (1974) from Ohio State, is the Truman Koehler Professor of Mathematics at Muhlenberg College. In the fall term of 2008 he is visiting at Harvard University and teaching a course on the work of Leonhard Euler.

    Over the years, he has directed NEH seminars on the history of mathematics and has spoken on historical topics at dozens of U.S. colleges and universities, as well as at the Smithsonian Institution, the Swiss Embassy in Washington, and on NPR's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday.

    In the 1990s, Dunham wrote three books on mathematics and its history: Journey Through Genuis: The Great Theorems of Mathematics (1990), The Mathematical Universe (1994), and Euler: The Master of Us All (1999). In the present millennium, he has written The Calculus Gallery: Masterpieces from Newton to Lebesgue (2005) and edited The Genius of Euler: Reflections on His Life and Work (2007). His expository writing has been recognized by the Mathematical Association of America with the George Pólya Award in 1992, the Trevor Evans Award in 1997, the Lester R. Ford Award in 2006, and the Beckenbach Prize in 2008. The Association of American Publishers designated The Mathematical Universe as the Best Mathematics Book of 1994.

    Our thanks to the Harvard Mathematics Department for hosting this event.



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    One Class. Many Perspectives.

    1:58

    A tremendous variety of students in a GRCC Marketing class talk about the value of having diverse perspectives.

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