Genetics Lectures


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    Q&A - Genetics as Revolution - 2015 JBS Haldane Lecture

    16:33

    Professor Alison Woollard answers questions from the audience after her JBS Haldane Lecture. Why is the cabbage genome bigger than ours? Was Mendel dishonest with his data? Can gene editing bring a cure for cystic fibrosis?
    Watch the full 2015 Genetics Society JBS Haldane Lecture here:
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    It is an everyday observation that the offspring of elephants are elephants and the offspring of humans are humans. Our biology is, quite literally, written in our DNA, and the copying and transmission of this genetic information is the most extraordinary process on earth.

    The ideas of genetics are revolutionary, from Mendel’s perfect 19th century description of the mechanism of heredity, through the molecular revolutions of the 20th century to the present day. Today, new technologies are galvanising disruptive change, not only in our understanding of biology, but in our ability to intervene in the very nature of life itself. What can we change? How? Why? And indeed, should we meddle at all?

    “The bravest”, said Thucydides, “Are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it”.

    Find out more about the JBS Haldane Lectures on the Genetics Society website:

    Watch Alison Woollard’s 2015 CHRISTMAS LECTURES:
    Alison Woollard is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford where she is also a Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford. She gave the 2013 CHRISTMAS LECTURES, 'Life Fantastic'

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    Where Did We All Come From? Tracing Human Migration Using Genetic Markers

    1:12:35

    Presented by Professor Moses Schanfield.

    Of all species on the face of the earth, humans are the most disperse, in that they occupy the most diverse eco-systems present on all large land masses and most large islands.
    In recent time, much work has been done using maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, and non-recombinant Y (NRY) chromosome markers to map human migration and ancestry. In addition, large numbers of other DNA based markers have been used for similar purposes. However, anthropological geneticists have been looking at human migration and ancestry for as long as there have been genetic markers, starting with the ABO blood groups.

    This talk reviews some of the realities and unrealities of ancestry testing, as done by commercial laboratories such as Ancestry.com, as well as the overall patterns of human migration and conclusions that can be made about modern humans in the last 100,000 years.

    Professor Schanfield is a world authority on the genetic markers on antibodies, and has applied genetic marker testing, both protein- and DNA-based, to the study of anthropologic and forensic genetics. He was involved in some of the earliest forensic DNA cases, and has been involved in some famous forensic cases including the OJ Simpson case and the JonBenét Ramsey case. Professor Schanfield is a co-editor of the book Forensic DNA Applications: An Interdisciplinary Perspective with Professor Dragan Primorac which will be released in February 2014 by Taylor and Francis. He is currently Professor of Forensic Science and Anthropology at George Washington University.

    Professor Schanfield has undergraduate and Masters Degrees in Anthropology from the University of Minnesota and Harvard University, respectively and a Ph.D in Human Genetics from the University of Michigan.

    Views expressed are those of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views
    of the National Capital Area Skeptics.

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    Gene regulation and the epigenome

    1:2:48

    With around 20-25,000 genes in the human genome, how do our body cells make sure genes work in the right place at the right time?

    2015 Francis Crick prize lecture on 'Gene regulation and the epigenome' by Professor Rob Klose, at the Royal Society, London, on 2 December 2015.


    YouTube thumbnail image: Genetic information winding out of a cell by Professor Rob Klose.

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    Genetic Engineering Will Change Everything Forever – CRISPR

    16:04

    Designer babies, the end of diseases, genetically modified humans that never age. Outrageous things that used to be science fiction are suddenly becoming reality. The only thing we know for sure is that things will change irreversibly.

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    Thanks to Volker Henn, James Gurney and (prefers anonymity) for help with this video!

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    Jeffrey Schneider, Konstantin Kaganovich, Tom Leiser, Archie Castillo, Russell Eishard, Ben Kershaw, Marius Stollen, Henry Bowman, Ben Johns, Bogdan Radu, Sam Toland, Pierre Thalamy, Christopher Morgan, Rocks Arent People, Ross Devereux, Pascal Michaud, Derek DuBreuil, Sofia Quintero, Robert Swiniarski, Merkt Kızılırmak, Michelle Rowley, Andy Dong, Saphir Patel, Harris Rotto, Thomas Huzij, Ryan James Burke, NTRX, Chaz Lewis, Amir Resali, The War on Stupid, John Pestana, Lucien Delbert, iaDRM, Jacob Edwards, Lauritz Klaus, Jason Hunt, Marcus : ), Taylor Lau, Rhett H Eisenberg, Mr.Z, Jeremy Dumet, Fatman13, Kasturi Raghavan, Kousora, Rich Sekmistrz, Mozart Peter, Gaby Germanos, Andreas Hertle, Alena Vlachova, Zdravko Šašek

    SOURCES AND FURTHER READING:

    The best book we read about the topic: GMO Sapiens



    (affiliate link, we get a cut if buy the book!)


    – Good Overview by Wired:


    –timeline of computer development:


    – Selective breeding:


    – DNA:


    – Radiation research:


    – inserting DNA snippets into organisms:


    – First genetically modified animal:


    – First GM patent:


    – chemicals produced by GMOs:




    – Flavr Savr Tomato:


    – First Human Engineering:


    – glowing fish:


    – CRISPR:


    – HIV cut from cells and rats with CRISPR:



    – first human CRISPR trials fighting cancer:


    first human CRISPR trial approved by Chinese for August 2016:


    – genetic diseases:


    – pregnancies with Down Syndrome terminated:

    ( 1999 European study)

    – CRISPR and aging:





    Help us caption & translate this video!

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    J.B.S. Haldane

    3:58

    Evolution project

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    4. Molecular Genetics I

    1:33:35

    (April 5, 2010) Robert Sapolsky makes interdisciplinary connections between behavioral biology and molecular genetic influences. He relates protein synthesis and point mutations to microevolutionary change, and discusses conflicting theories of gradualism and punctuated equilibrium and the influence of epigenetics on development theories.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    Marie Angell, J.B.S. Haldane-Scientist, Rationalist, His Own Self, Houston Oasis, Nov 30, 2014

    13:16

    Marie Angell presents “J.B.S. Haldane—Scientist, Rationalist, His Own Self” during the Community Moment at the Houston Oasis Gathering on November 30, 2014.

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    Biological Sciences at Oxford University

    11:21

    Want to know more about studying at Oxford University? Watch this short film to hear tutors and students talk about this undergraduate degree. For more information on this course, please visit our website at

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    Michio Kaku interview on A New Industrial Revolution

    4:10

    Michio Kaku speaks with FOX News about MIT's recent development of a new virus built battery capable of powering cars and other electronic devices. The holy grail of manufacturing is to create a molecular factory that is using viruses and molecules to cut-splice & dice other molecules to create Computers, Laptops, Transistors & Batteries. Now, They reprogrammed a virus to do Exactly That!

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    Genetics 101 : What are genes?

    4:26

    In this video collaboration from Khan Academy and 23andMe, you'll learn about the basics of cells, chromosomes, and the genes contained in your DNA.

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    How to Rewire & Evolve Your Brain to Experience a New Reality - Dr. Joe Dispenza

    48:05

    ✔ Dr. Joe Dispenza - A Collection of Talks and Interviews (Playlist)


    How to Rewire & Evolve Your Brain to Experience a New Reality - Dr. Joe Dispenza

    Neurons That Wire Together, Fire Together:
    What this means in practical terms is that each time you repeat a particular thought or action, you strengthen the connection between a set of brain cells or neurons. As neuroscience expert and psychologist Dr. Rick Hanson says, “the mind and the brain are a unified system. As the brain changes, the mind changes. As the mind changes, the brain changes. This means that you can use your conscious mind to make lasting changes to your brain to bring about greater well-being and happiness in your life.”


    Joe Dispenza, D.C., studied biochemistry at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and holds a Bachelor of Science degree with an emphasis in neuroscience. He received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Life University in Atlanta, Georgia, graduating magna cum laude. Dr. Dispenza's postgraduate training and continuing education has been in neurology, neuroscience, brain function and chemistry, cellular biology, memory formation, aging and longevity. Joe Dispenza was featured in the award winning film, What The Bleep Do We Know?This lecture provides basic yet powerful information on how to co-create ones day and how to use focused concentration, repetition, and visualization (mental rehearsing) to rewire the brain. These are skills we can all harness.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ✱ The movie referenced by Joe Dispenza at around 40 seconds into this video is What the Bleep Do We Know - Down the Rabbit Hole
    ✔ Watch it here (Playlist):


    ✔ Watch it on Vimeo (Full):


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Dr Joe Dispenza


    Dr. Joe Dispenza's Blog


    Rewire Your Brain and ReCreate Your Life An Interview with Joe Dispenza


    ✱ Quantum Factor Interview ~ Dr. Joe Dispenza ✱


    By choosing your thoughts,
    and by selecting which emotional currents you will release
    and which you will reinforce,
    you determine the quality of your Light.
    You determine the effects that you will have upon others,
    and the nature of the experiences of your life.
    ~ Gary Zukav - from Seat Of The Soul

    Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. Match the frequency of the reality you want and you cannot help but get that reality. It can be no other way. This is not philosophy. This is physics. Bashar
    ----------------------------------------------

    Neurons That Wire Together Fire Together on Pinterest


    Neuroscience


    Law of Attraction Method


    The Science of Thought


    Can Our Brain Waves Affect Our Physical Reality?


    How does the body make electricity -- and how does it use it?


    Conscious thought and quantum theory. (Physics of physical reality)


    NEURONS & SYNAPSES


    How to Manifest Your Reality


    The Human Energy Field and DNA: How You Choose Your Genes


    Thought Power - Your Thoughts Create Your Reality


    Consciousness Creates Reality: New Thoughts = New Action = New Life


    The Law of Vibration


    The Science of Energy and Thought - Subconscious Mind Power Read More:

    Thoughts are powerful pulses of energy


    You Thought You Were Only Thinking - and where's the harm in that?

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    Q&A - The Wondrous World of Perovskites - with Mike Glazer

    13:47

    Mike Glazer answers questions from the audience following his 2017 Bragg Lecture on Perovskites.
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    The crystalline materials known as Perovskites make up 38% of the volume of the earth. Moreover, they have many very important practical uses, for example in electronics, ultrasonics and in thermal sensing devices. So what are they exactly? Mike Glazer explains how tiny changes in their crystal structures can lead to such a vast array of different properties and why they are so important in our daily lives.

    This Discourse is supported by the Bragg Lecture Fund and was filmed on 31 March 2017.

    Mike Glazer is an Emeritus Professor of the Oxford University Department of Physics. He is the Vice President of the International Union of Crystallography and recently wrote 'A Very Short Introduction to Crystallography' for Oxford University Press.

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    Neil Turok Public Lecture: The Astonishing Simplicity of Everything

    1:39:14

    On Oct. 7, 2015, Perimeter Institute Director Neil Turok opened the 2015/16 season of the PI Public Lecture Series with a talk about the remarkably simplicity that underlies nature. Turok discussed how this simplicity at the largest and tiniest scales of the universe is pointing toward new avenues of physics research and could lead to revolutionary advances in technology.

    More on Perimeter Institute Public Lectures:

    perimeterinstitute.ca
    twitter.com/perimeter
    facebook.com/pioutreach

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    Amazing Body Illusions! Psychology for Kids - ExpeRimental #24

    7:54

    Try 8 illusions that'll confuse your body, and investigate your sense of proprioception in this fun experiment for families!
    Download the infosheet here for more instructions:
    Tell us what you think, and you could win £100:
    Send us a photo of you doing the experiment, and you could win £100!

    Alex and the pupils of Ben Jonson Primary School experiment with their sense of proprioception: our awareness of our body. By doing eight different illusions that trick your understanding of your own body, they learn how their senses work, and how they can be confused by conflicting information.
    In the process, they learn how our sense combine to create the full perception we have of the world.

    Remember, everyone responds differently to these illusions. Some people won’t feel the effects of some activities, and that’s why it’s good to try as many as possible. As you do them, think about why they might work better on some people than others.

    For more instructions on carrying out the activity, and to download the templates, click here:


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    Biology Lecture - 58 - Genetics

    7:16

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    My Favorite Scientific Quote of All-Time

    3:59

    J. B. S. Haldane's quote regarding the four stages of acceptance when individuals are exposed to a novel idea perfectly sums up my scientific career.
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    How To Make a Hollow Mask Illusion - Psychology for Kids - ExpeRimental #22

    5:47

    Baffle your brain with the famous 'hollow mask illusion', and experiment with how it works by making your own.
    Watch the Einstein mask illusion:
    Send us a photo of your masks, and you could win £100!
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    Rachel and her children Eva and Daniel explore how our brains perceive faces by experimenting with a classic illusion.

    In this activity, Eva and Daniel investigate what factors make this illusion work, and think about why our brains can be tricked in this way. Hands-on investigations like this are the perfect way to encourage children to think about how their brains work, and the way we interpret the world.

    This series of ExpeRimental is supported by The British Psychological Society.

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    How well do Thai students understand the 1932 Democratic Revolution?

    1:49

    How much room is there to learn about revolution in Thailand’s education system, a system facing mounting criticism for preaching obedience over creativity? Today, on the 85th anniversary of the 1932 Democratic Revolution, few students are likely to remember the arguable birth of democracy in Thailand.

    Much of Thailand did not know there existed a plaque in Bangkok memorialising the 1932 Democratic Revolution, until it disappeared in mid-April this year. Some were familiar with the name People’s Party, having perhaps encountered it in a textbook containing some cursory information on the regime change that took place on 24 June 1932. But more than a few — especially among younger generations — were surely unsure what happened that day, and of the day’s historical significance.

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    What is DNA and How Does it Work?

    5:24

    Support Stated Clearly on Patreon:

    Issues of genetics and DNA are constantly cropping up in the news from food production and health, to legal cases and ethics. We hear about DNA in movies like Jurassic Park and X-men, we learn bits and pieces about it from TV shows like Dexter and and CSI, but what exactly is DNA, and how does it work?

    This animated short film has been made for those wanting a simple introduction (or even a refresher) on how DNA creates a living creature. In this video you will learn a bit about genetic code, DNA transcription and translation, and the importance of proteins in the chemistry of life.

    Video was written, presented, and animated by Jon Perry
    Music by Anthony Danzl (check out his website at )
    Research and instructional design by Varinia Acosta

    You can learn more about DNA and Stated Clearly on our website at

    Portuguese captions by Marcos André

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    J B S Haldane

    50

    Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students
    Grade : 8
    Subject : Physics
    Lesson : Our Scientists
    Topic: J.B.S.Haldane

    Haldane was born in Oxford, the son of distinguished physiologist, John Scott Haldane. While still at school he helped his father in research on the physiology of breathing. He was educated at Eton becoming a gifted classicist and mathematician, and in 1911 entered New College, Oxford with a mathematics scholarship. He went on to take a double first in mathematics (1912), and classics and philosophy (1914).

    Visit oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.

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    Cosmology: Galileo to Gravitational Waves - with Hiranya Peiris

    51:27

    In the last decade we have started to answer ageo-old questions like the age of the Universe and what it contains. Hiranya Peiris unravels the detective story, explaining what we know and how we know it.
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    Modern fundamental physics contains ideas just as revolutionary as those of Copernicus or Newton; ideas that may radically change our understanding of the world; ideas such as extra dimensions of space, or the possible existence of other universes.

    Testing these concepts requires enormous energies, far higher than what is achievable by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and in fact, beyond any conceivable Earth-bound experiments. However, at the Big Bang, the Universe itself performed the ultimate experiment and left clues and evidence about what was behind the origin of the cosmos as we know it, and how it is evolving. And the biggest clue is the afterglow of the Big Bang itself.

    In the past decade we have been able to answer age-old questions accurately, such as how old the Universe is, what it contains, and its destiny. Along with these answers have also come many exciting new questions. Join Hiranya Peiris to unravel the detective story, explaining what we have uncovered, and how we know what we know.

    Hiranya Peiris is Professor of Astrophysics in the Astrophysics Group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at University College London. She is also the Principal Investigator of the CosmicDawn project, funded by the European Research Council

    She is also a member of the Planck Collaboration and of the ongoing Dark Energy Survey, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Her work both delves into the Cosmic Microwave Background and contributes towards the next generation galaxy surveys that will yield deep insights into the evolution of the Universe.

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    Its Rocket Science! with Professor Chris Bishop

    58:04

    Starting with the one simple principle that has powered every rocket that's ever flown, Professor Chris Bishop launches through an explosive journey to the moon and back.
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    This lecture from the Cambridge science festival is packed with demonstrations of the science that sends people into space. A family-filled lecture theatre sees flying projectiles, the fiery combustion of energetic propellants, and the impressive roar and flame of a hybrid rocket engine.
    Other great videos from Chris Bishop:
    The science of fireworks!
    Explosive science
    Chemical curiosities:
    Watch Professor Chris Bishop's 2008 Royal Institution CHRISTMAS LECTURES on the Ri Channel:

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    Nanoscale Machines: Building the Future with Molecules

    58:52

    Professor of Chemical Nanoscience Neil Champness explores the future of nanoscale machines. Can we build a machine simply from molecules at the nanoscale?
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    The idea of building machines that are only nanometres in size is a dream that has formed the basis of Hollywood movies. How realistic is such a goal and how would we go about tackling the challenges that lie in wait? How do we begin to build a machine simply from molecules? Join Neil Champness to explore the future of nanoscale machines.

    Neil Champness is Professor of Chemical Nanoscience & Head of Inorganic and Materials Chemistry at the University of Nottingham. He and his research group are interested in chemical nanoscience and all aspects of molecular organisation. His research is highly cited, being one of the top 100 most cited chemists 2000-2010 and last year, this was recognised by being named a Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher.



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    How To Drink Your Own Urine – 2015 CHRISTMAS LECTURES

    3:25

    Dr Kevin Fong puts his faith in science, and drinks his own wee after it’s been filtered through a semi-permeable membrane.
    Watch the full final lecture of the 2015 CHRISTMAS LECTURES on ‘How to survive in space’ on the Ri Channel now:
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    In the third and final of the 2015 CHRISTMAS LECTURES, space doctor Kevin Fong explores the 'The next frontier' of human space travel.

    In a series finale, Kevin investigates how the next generation of astronauts will be propelled across the vast chasm of space to Mars and beyond, with explosive demonstrations, expert guests, and a live spacewalk from the ISS.

    So, how will life be artificially sustained as we travel the millions of kilometres to the Red Planet and on into the cosmos? How will our food last for 3 years or more? And what is waiting what for us when we finally land? With earth shattering experiments, top space scientists and a spacewalk live from the ISS, Dr Kevin Fong reveals how we'll survive that voyage to space's next frontier’ and beyond...


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    An Introduction to Mendelian Genetics | Biomolecules | MCAT | Khan Academy

    5:10

    An introduction to Mendelian Genetics and inheritance. By Ross Firestone.

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    MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions!

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    Introduction to DNA

    10:53

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    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology

    38:55

    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps
    Instructor: Eric Lander
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    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
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    Volcanic Winter, Population Bottlenecks, and Human Evolution

    1:7:50

    2015 Hallam L. Movius, Jr. lecture and reception with Stanley H. Ambrose, Professor of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    The eruption of the Mount Toba supervolcano in the Indonesian island of Sumatra 74,000 years ago brought about an era of severe environmental degradation that decimated populations of Neanderthals and modern humans. Archaeological evidence suggests that modern humans survived this era by creating cooperative intergroup social networks and behaving like tribes. Neanderthals, on the other hand, behaved more like primate troops, living in small, closed territories with limited intergroup interaction. Stanley Ambrose will discuss the behaviors that contributed to the competitive advantage of modern humans and the demise of Neanderthals. Recorded March 12, 2015.

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    Genetics, Cognitive Ability, and Education

    40:53

    Further conversation with Cambridge PhD candidate Daphne Martschenko concerning genetics of cognitive ability, implications for education policy, etc.

    See also earlier conversation:

    Dunedin paper referenced in the video (polygenic score prediction of adult success for different SES groups):

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    What is Symmetry in Physics? With Tara Shears

    4:00

    Symmetry underlines our whole understanding of the universe. And the deeper we look, the more symmetries we find, reflecting our world in new and beautiful ways.
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    Symmetry is vital to understanding and predicting how our universe works. The relationship between symmetry and the mechanics of the universe is fundamental to physics. From Noether’s theorem to the new and exciting world of local symmetries being revealed by modern day physics, Tara Shears explores the physics of symmetry.

    By revealing nature’s parameters, symmetry gives definition to the world as we understand it. It is a fundamental principle that makes phenomena repeatable and predictable. But if symmetries are so pervasive and influential in our world, why do we see so much asymmetry and chaos?

    This animation was produced by Rosanna Wan, our 2016-17 animator-in-residence, supported by the Sfumato Foundation.

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    The Story of Spacetime – with Fay Dowker

    36:32

    Fay Dowker tells the story of general relativity and its interactions with Newtonian physics, from Galileo to cutting edge research on the granularity of spacetime.
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    Watch the Q&A that follows this talk here:

    Fay Dowker is Professor of Theoretical Physics at Imperial College London and works on the problem of quantum gravity. Her research is based on the hypothesis that spacetime is fundamentally granular or atomic, and she has done numerous public lectures.


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    How To Make An Ames Room Illusion - Psychology for Kids - ExpeRimental #23

    6:01

    Experiment with your perception of distance and size by making the amazing Ames room illusion in this fun experiment for children.
    Download the template from here:
    Tell us what you think, and you could win £100:
    Send us a photo of your Ames room, and you could win £100!

    We know that a toy car is much smaller than a real one, but when you hold a car up to your eye and compare it to a car in the distance, they can look the same size.

    We intuitively understand this, but thinking about why this happens is the start of a fun experiment to investigate how our brains make sense of the three dimensional world around us. In this video, Dwain and Sahara learn a simple trick to make their drawings look three-dimensional, and then build an Ames room: a classic illusion that plays a trick on your mind with strange proportions.

    Download the templates to build your own model here. Do you think the illusion would work on a big scale too? We once tried it! Check it out here:

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    Heredity: Crash Course Biology #9

    10:18

    Hank and his brother John discuss heredity via the gross example of relative ear wax moistness.

    Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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    This video uses sounds from Freesound.org, a list of which can be found, along with the REFERENCES for this episode, in the Google document here:

    tags: crashcourse, science, biology, evolution, genetics, heredity, aristotle, bloodlines, gregor mendel, mendelian genetics, mendelian trait, classical genetics, chromosome, gene, polygenic, pleiotropic, allele, ear wax gene, somatic, diploid, gametes, sperm, egg, haploid, polyploid, dominance, dominant, recessive, heterozygous, homozygous, phenotype, punnett square, reginald c. punnett, sex-linked inheritance, autosome Support CrashCourse on Subbable:

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    Surgery From Scalpels to Robots - with Pankaj Chandak

    1:5:01

    Pankaj Chandak goes on a journey through the history of surgery, from the first antiseptics to medical robots.
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    Join award-winning surgeon and researcher Pankaj Chandak on a journey of medical innovation, from the first antiseptics of Joseph Lister to surgical robots. Hear how modern-day surgeons are realising the impossible with 3D printing, perfusion machines and antibody-supressing drugs.

    Pankaj Chandak is an award-winning transplant surgeon who uses innovative techniques to improve patient outcomes. He was the first surgeon to use 3D printing to successfully transplant an adult kidney into a paediatric patient. He is currently a Specialist Registrar in Transplant Surgery at Guy’s, St Thomas’ and Great Ormond Street Hospitals and is working towards a PhD.

    Pankaj and his surgical team from Guy’s took part in Stephen Daldry’s Netflix Production The Crown to reproduce an original operation performed on King George VI in the 1950s - thought to be one of the few times real surgeons were used for film in this way.

    This talk was filmed at the Ri on 12. April 2017.

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    18 Things You Should Know About Genetics

    3:28

    Gene Screen BC 2011 Participant.
    18 Things You Should Know About Genetics is an animated film that presents fundamental background information about genetics, as well as offering some quirky but interesting facts about DNA, genes and genetics. It was created to be an upbeat, fun educational short film to initiate and draw interest to this sometimes daunting and seemingly complex subject matter.

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    Splicing and Dicing DNA: Genome Engineering and the CRISPR Revolution

    1:24:26

    CRISPR: It’s the powerful gene editing technology transforming biomedical research. Fast, cheap and easy to use, it allows scientists to rewrite the DNA in just about any organism—including humans—with tests on human embryos already underway. The technique’s potential to radically reshape everything from disease prevention to the future of human evolution has driven explosive progress and heated debate. Join the world’s CRISPR pioneers to learn about the enormous possibilities and ethical challenges as we stand on the threshold of a brave new world of manipulating life’s fundamental code.

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    Original Program Date: June 3 2016
    MODERATOR: Richard Besser
    PARTICIPANTS: George Church, Luke Dow, Josephine Johnston, Ben Matthews, Harry Ostrer, Noel Sauer

    What is CRISPR? 00:05

    Introduction by Richard Besser 3:58

    Participant Introductions. 5:02

    What is so powerful about CRISPR? 7:25

    How is CRISPR is used? 13:00

    How will CRISPR help eliminate Zika Virus? 20:45

    Modifying 60 genes at once in a pig. 26:02

    What are potential agricultural advantages from CRISPR? 28:44

    If you have eaten CRISPR cells? 35:00

    Using a gene drives to eliminate virus? 37:40

    Creating an off switch for CRISPR 40:27

    How is it ethical to not rid the world of malaria? 42:55

    What is the difference between editing a germ line and editing a cancer cell? 48:27

    Why would the first CRISPR baby create backlash? 58:48

    How do we regular CRISPR used in military applications? 1:06:33

    What is the regulation to be expected from CRISPR? 1:13:09

    What does a CRISPR-ised world look like? 1:16:00

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    Mind/Brain Lecture March 2015

    1:39:25



    Searching for Simplicity: A Physicist's Quest
    for Theories of Mind and Brain

    Our guest speaker:
    William Bialek
    John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in
    Physics, Princeton University and
    Director, Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences,
    The Graduate Center/CUNY


    William Bialek is the John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics and a member of the multidisciplinary Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics at Princeton University. In addition, he serves as Visiting Presidential Professor of Physics at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and Director of the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences which provides a home for theoretical research in the sciences and sponsors a wide variety of seminars and workshops, bringing together CUNY faculty, students, and visitors in the quest for more compelling mathematical descriptions of the world around us.

    William Bialek was elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences in May 2012. The award recognizes his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research, and election to the academy is considered one of the highest honors that can be accorded a US scientist or engineer. Bialek's influential research has addressed problems such as the dynamics of individual biological molecules, the decisions made by single cells in a developing embryo, and the code that the brain uses in representing information about the world around us. A persistent theme in Bialek's work is the remarkable efficiency and precision of life's basic mechanisms, which often approach the limits set by basic physical principles. He has been a key figure in the emergence of biophysics as a subdiscipline within physics, and in bringing the quantitative traditions of physics to bear on a broad range of phenomena in biology.

    Abstract: Theoretical physics is the search for simple, compelling mathematical descriptions of the natural world. Over nearly four centuries, since Galileo, this search has been extraordinarily successful: from deep inside the atomic nucleus out to the farthest reaches of the universe, and with many stops in between, we can predict what will be seen as we look carefully at the world, using our most precise instruments. Beyond the triumph of understanding, mathematical theories of the natural world give us the tools to design new devices, and are at the foundations of life changing technologies. It must be admitted, however, that one part of the world has largely evaded the grasp of theory, and this is the world of our immediate human experience: the brain and mind.

    Physicists have been fascinated by the brain and mind for more than a century. Always searching for simplicity, we are challenged by the evident complexity of the cells, synapses, and myriad molecules that are the basis for our mental life. In this lecture I will survey modern efforts to build a theoretical physics of the brain. One important theme is that our sensory systems often come close to the limits set by the laws of physics, as our eyes count single quanta of light and our ears detect vibrations smaller than the diameter of an atom. While there are many ways to build a brain that might work, there are many fewer ways to build a brain that can approach such nearly optimal performance. Perhaps, out of its complexity, the brain emerges as simpler, and more perfect, than we imagined.

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    Dr Alison Woollard talks about her AICR funded research

    10:11

    Dr Alison Woollard talks about her AICR funded research at the University of Oxford.

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    Why is Life the Way it Is? with Nick Lane

    33:47

    The vital question: Earth teems with life but why is it the way it is, and how did it begin in the first place? Nick Lane unravels the tangled history of life.
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    Nick Lane and Matthew Cobb came together to tell the story of life. Watch Matthew Cobb’s take on the tale here:
    And watch the Q&A here:

    Nick Lane is an evolutionary biochemist in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London. His work focuses on the origin of life, and the origin and evolution of eukaryotes. He is also author of prize-winning popular science books, including 'Life ascending'.


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    GENETICS Introduction by Professor Fink

    48:26

    In this Video Lecture Professor Fink provides a simple description of genetic concepts first using the trait of Eye Color & a Punnett Square, and then describing the transmission of most Genetic Diseases using a Punnett Square. Reference is made to dominant genes, recessive genes, the Genotype, homozygous, heterozygous, the Phenotype, alleles, Genotypic Ratio, Phenotypic Ratio, Carrier and the use of a Pedigree Chart.
    Professor Fink then describes the characteristics of Benign versus Malignant Tumors (Cancer) and the 4 Major Theories related to the Causes of Cancer. Reference is made to oncogenes, metastasis, transformation, Genetic Factors (BRCA & p-53), Mutagenic (Carcinogenic) Factors, Non-Lytic (Lysogenic viruses; Human Papilloma Virus; HPV), and the role of the Immune System.

    Check-out professor fink's web-site for additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: professorfink.com

    Down-loadable e-Books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at:

    “Hard Copy” Lecture Outlines can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at:

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    official Christopher Hitchens and John Haldane at Oxford - We Dont Do God? - The Veritas Forum

    1:40:40

    Does religion have a place in the public square? With it, can we have peace? Without it, can we have dignity? Join Christopher Hitchens, world-famous British journalist and anti-theist, and John Haldane, leading Scottish philosopher, commentator, and broadcaster, in a discussion on rights, dignity, faith and public life. The Veritas Forum at Oxford, 2010.

    Over the past two decades, The Veritas Forum has been hosting vibrant discussions on life's hardest questions and engaging the world's leading colleges and universities with Christian perspectives and the relevance of Jesus. Learn more at with upcoming events and over 600 pieces of media on topics including science, philosophy, music, business, medicine, and more!

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    Richard Dawkins - CHRISTMAS LECTURES 1991 - Growing up in the Universe

    57:37

    The world-famous evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins presents the Royal Institution CHRISTMAS LECTURES in 1991.

    Original broadcast live on the BBC, the series explored our own growing knowledge of how life grows up in the universe.

    This is the first lecture in the series entitled Waking up in the Universe.

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    The Science of Sleep: Melatonin to Neural Pathways

    52:36

    You can also listen to this event on our podcast. Search Ri Science Podcast in your app, or click here:
    Russell Foster, Debra Skene and Stafford Lightman discuss the science of sleep. Why do we need sleep and what are the physiological processes driving our circadian rhythm? When is our circadian clock disrupted and how does this affect our health? Cognitive neuroscientist Vincent Walsh chairs the debate.
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    The science behind sleeplessness can help us understand our rhythms so we can live better and healthier lives. While hormones, such a melatonin, play a role in driving our circadian clock, the amount of sleep we get and our sleep cycles also affect our hormonal release patterns, with far-reaching implications on our health.
    Cognitive neuroscientist Vincent Walsh chairs a discussion with a panel of experts who specialise in circadian rhythms. They explore how light detection plays a role in our sleep-wake cycles, how hormone release is regulated and the implications of changes to our circadian clock and sleeplessness over time.

    This event was supported by British Psychological Society and Society for Endocrinology.


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    Why is Multitasking So Hard? Psychology for Kids – ExpeRimental #25

    4:21

    Learn how different parts of your brain deal with different tasks, test your multitasking skills, and explore how some activities 'interfere' with each other.
    Tell us what you think, and you could win £100:
    Download the infosheet here for more instructions:
    Send us a photo of you doing the experiment, and you could win £100!

    Aaron and Phoebe experiment with their ability to multitask. By trying to do a variety of activities in combination with each other, they explore why some sorts of multitasking are easy, and some are almost impossible. Can you count while someone else says numbers at you? Can you rub your tummy and pat your head at the same time? Can you sing one song while listening to another? These pairs are all similar tasks that 'interfere' with each other, because the same part of the brain is needed to carry both out.
    However, try rubbing your head while counting, and it's not so hard, because your brain can tackle each task simultaneously. Experiment at home to see what combinations are hardest, and whether you can manage them with a bit of practise.

    This series of ExpeRimental is supported by the British Psychological Society:

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    Science 101 for Parents - Or 20 Years of the Genetic Revolution in One Hour

    1:11:00

    Jeffrey Friedman, The Rockefeller University: The spring 2009 Science 101 for Parents program provided a whirlwind tour of modern genetics guided by JEFFREY FRIEDMAN, whose discoveries—including the identification of an obesity gene and the weight-regulating hormone leptin—have begun a whole new chapter in the field of genetics. Dr. Friedman is a professor at Rockefeller University and founding director of its Starr Center for Human Genetics.

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    The Race to Crack the Genetic Code with Matthew Cobb

    38:37

    How was the code of DNA cracked? How did it confirm the theory of evolution? And why did life evolve the way it did? Matthew Cobb unravels the tangled story.
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    Nick Lane and Matthew Cobb came together to tell the story of life. Watch Nick Lane's take on the tale here:
    Watch the Q&A here:

    Matthew Cobb is Professor of Zoology and a senior lecturer in animal behaviour at the University of Manchester. After spending some time researching humans at the institute of psychiatry, a lot of his work now investigates insect behaviour and its evolutionary and genetic basis, particularly smell.


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    How To Make Fake Poo - Psychology for Kids - ExpeRimental #26

    5:53

    Follow our recipe for delicious fake poo made of chocolate and biscuits, and teach your children about how our emotions form.
    Download the infosheet & emotion cards here:
    Tell us what you think, and you could win £100:
    Send us a photo of you doing the experiment, and you could win £100!

    Shock your children by taking a taste of a repulsive poo! Then, by following our recipe, explore what it is that makes us feel emotions like disgust.

    Through this activity, Dwain and Sahara learn how our emotions and opinions can change over time as our understanding develops. By making her own fake poo with chocolate and biscuits, Sahara discovers that she can 'unlearn' her feelings of disgust when she sees that not all is as it seems.

    For more instructions, the full recipe, and to download the photos shows at the start, click here:


    This series of ExpeRimental is supported by the British Psychological Society:

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    Genetic Genealogy & the value of DNA testing

    1:1:34

    Our DNA allows us to track through time back to the last major migration of humans out of Africa 50,000 years ago, and even before that to the emergence of our species. As such, together with archaeological and linguistic evidence, it is an indispensable tool for the study of human migration and deep ancestry. But it is also revolutionizing the way we practice genealogy. Y-DNA helps us follow the father’s father’s father’s line, allows us to connect with same-surname cousins, and is an excellent tool for the study of surnames, their origins, and their evolution. Mitochondrial DNA allows us track our mother’s mother’s mother’s line and connect with cousins on the direct female line. And autosomal DNA helps us estimate our ethnic makeup and connect with genetic cousins with whom we share a common ancestor within the past 5-7 generations. All three tests can help us confirm that our genealogical research is correct, but can also help us break through our Brick Walls in ways previously unimagined. This presentation will review these three main tests and their application in genealogy, as well as their pros and cons. We will also track into the future, and look at the major role that DNA will play in transforming genealogy over the next 5-10 years, which will prove to be one of the most exciting times in genealogy ever.

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    How Movement Drives Evolution – with Matt Wilkinson

    58:07

    Zoologist Matt Wilkinson leads a whistle-stop tour of the evolution of movement, showing how going from place to place has dominated the four-billion-year history of life.
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    Why are there no flying monkeys but plenty of flying dinosaurs? Why are there no natural wheels on Earth? And how can a human outrun an antelope? Join zoologist Matt Wilkinson on a whistle-stop tour of the evolution of moving around, and find out how our ancestors became two-legged, why we have opposable thumbs, backbones and brains, how even trees are obsessed with movement, and how going from place to place has dominated the four-billion-year history of life.

    Matt Wilkinson is a zoologist and professional actor who has recently written the acclaimed book Restless Creatures.
    Recorded 2 June 2016

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