Genetics Lectures

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    Biology 1A - Lecture 25: Human Genetics and Epigenetics

    50:48

    General Biology Lecture

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    Genetics as Revolution - 2015 JBS Haldane Lecture with Alison Woollard

    1:5:15

    The ideas of genetics are revolutionary. Today, technology is galvanising disruptive change in our understanding and ability to intervene with nature itself. What can we change, and should we?
    Professor Alison Woollard presents the 2015 Genetics Society JBS Haldane Lecture.

    Watch the Q&A here:

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    It is an everyday observation that the offspring of elephants are elephants and the offspring of humans are humans. Our biology is, quite literally, written in our DNA, and the copying and transmission of this genetic information is the most extraordinary process on earth.

    The ideas of genetics are revolutionary, from Mendel’s perfect 19th century description of the mechanism of heredity, through the molecular revolutions of the 20th century to the present day. Today, new technologies are galvanising disruptive change, not only in our understanding of biology, but in our ability to intervene in the very nature of life itself. What can we change? How? Why? And indeed, should we meddle at all?

    “The bravest”, said Thucydides, “Are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it”. See if you agree.

    Find out more about the JBS Haldane Lectures on the Genetics Society website:

    Watch Alison Woollard’s 2013 CHRISTMAS LECTURES:

    Alison Woollard is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford where she is also a Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford. She gave the 2013 CHRISTMAS LECTURES, 'Life Fantastic'

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    Genetics Part 1

    58:57

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    Biology 1A - Lecture 14: Microbial Genetics and evolution-ch

    50:02

    General Biology Lecture

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    Genetics lecture 8 | mitosis and meiosis cell division

    18:17

    This lecture explains about the discovery of mitosis and meiosis cell division and it also explains the difference between mitosis vs meiosis.
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    4. Molecular Genetics I

    1:33:35

    (April 5, 2010) Robert Sapolsky makes interdisciplinary connections between behavioral biology and molecular genetic influences. He relates protein synthesis and point mutations to microevolutionary change, and discusses conflicting theories of gradualism and punctuated equilibrium and the influence of epigenetics on development theories.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    Genetics Video Lecture

    15:02

    Takes notes as you watch this video on Gregor Mendel and basic inheritance.

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    20. Human Genetics, SNPs, and Genome Wide Associate Studies

    1:17:57

    MIT 7.91J Foundations of Computational and Systems Biology, Spring 2014
    View the complete course:
    Instructor: David Gifford

    This lecture by Prof. David Gifford is on human genetics. He covers how scientists discover variation in the human genome. He discusses how to prioritize variants based on their importance. And then covers how to prove causation, not just correlation.

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    More information at
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    Genetics - Linkage & Gene Mapping

    15:29

    Linked genes are used as markers. Gene mapping is a technique to locate the genes on a chromosome

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    Biology 1A - Lecture 18: Mendelian genetics

    48:47

    General Biology Lecture

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    Linked Genes, Crossing Over and Genetic Recombination

    13:36

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    Introduction to Human Genetics- for medical students video lecture

    16:57

    This video lecture includes the definition of human genetics, its different branches, history, common terminologies, principle of human genetics, definition of Mendelian inheritance and classification of genetic disorders. This is specially designed for medical school students [MBBS, BDS, Nursing, Human Biology, Biotechnology]. It is the power point based video lecture with high quality audio and video.

    Regards
    Janak Awasthi
    Nepal

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    Biology Lecture - 58 - Genetics

    7:16

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    GENETICS Introduction by Professor Fink

    48:26

    Check-out professor fink's web-site or additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: professorfink.com


    Down-loadable e-books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink (as well as hard copy versions) can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at:

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    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology

    38:55

    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps
    Instructor: Eric Lander
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    NCERT BIOLOGY LECTURES GENETICS MONO AND DIHYBRID CROSS

    52:01

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    Genetics, epigenetics and disease

    1:17:03

    Royal Society GlaxoSmithKline Prize Lecture given by Professor Adrian Bird CBE FMedSci FRS on Tuesday 22 January 2013.

    Adrian Bird CBE FMedSci FRS is the Buchanan Chair of Genetics at the University of Edinburgh.

    The human genome sequence has been available for more than a decade, but its significance is still not fully understood. While most human genes have been identified, there is much to learn about the DNA signals that control them. This lecture described an unusually short DNA sequence, just two base pairs long, CG, which occurs in several chemically different forms. Defects in signalling by CG are implicated in disease. For example, the autism spectrum disorder Rett syndrome is caused by loss of a protein that reads methylated CG and affects the activity of genes.

    The Royal Society GlaxoSmithKline Prize Lecture is awarded for original contributions to medical and veterinary sciences published within ten years from the date of the award.

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    The Genetic Code

    13:25

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    Genetics lecture 9 | Sex chromosome and sex determination

    9:24

    Genetics lecture 9- This lecture explains about sex chromosome and sex determination mechanisms in different animals.
    For more information, log on to-

    Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here-

    Download the study materials here-

    Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology-
    Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- shomusbiology.com/dvd-store
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    Professor Philip Mitchell Lectures on the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder

    28:06

    I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (

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    Genetics of Human Origins and Adaptation

    58:33

    Bones, Stones, and Genes: The Origin of Modern Humans.
    Genetics of Human Origins and Adaptation
    The second lecture of the Holiday Lectures on Science 2011 series by Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
    Lecture given by Sarah A. Tishkoff

    Genetic evidence shows that humans evolved in Africa and continue to evolve.

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    Rhind Lectures 2015 Archaeology and Genetics Panel Discussion

    1:48:15

    Professor Mary Bownes, University of Edinburgh, chairs an international panel, including Professor Keith Dobney, University of Aberdeen, Dr Greger Larson, University of Oxford, Dr Eva-Maria Geigl, CNRS University Paris 7, and Professor Ian Barnes, Natural History Museum.

    Genetics is providing new areas of research for archaeology. But how should we engage with both the process and the resultant data? Do the traditional archaeological approaches to individuals and groups, mobility and adaptation, and above all, identity, readily combine with genetics? Are current archaeological field techniques, skills and infrastructure fit for purpose? How should archaeology constructively interact with this brave new world?

    Sponsored by AOC Archaeology Group and supported by Historic Scotland, the RSE and University of Edinburgh

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    AIPMT Crash course lecture on genetics-blood group by siddharth sanghvi

    1:54:26

    AIPMT AIEEE AIIMS AFMC MPPMT JIPMER BHU RPMT DPMT CPMT PUJ PMT LECTURES BY SIDDHARTH SANGHVI

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    Virology Lectures 2017 #3: Genomes and Genetics

    1:9:15

    There are many different kinds of viruses on Earth, but only seven different types of viral genome. In this lecture we review each genome type and trace the pathway to mRNA. We discuss the largest and smallest genomes, what is and is not encoded in the genome, and how to manipulate the viral genome to facilitate their study and their use as vectors.

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    Virology Lectures 2016 #3: Genomes and Genetics

    1:10:47

    There are billions and billions of viruses on Earth, but only seven different types of viral genome. In this lecture we go over each genome type and trace the pathway to mRNA. We discuss the largest and smallest genomes, what is and is not encoded in the genome, and how to manipulate the genome to study viruses and make them into vectors for therapy.

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    Mendelian Genetics

    16:04

    029 - Mendelian Genetics

    Paul Andersen explains simple Mendelian genetics. He begins with a brief introduction of Gregor Mendel and his laws of segregation and independent assortment. He then presents a number of simple genetics problems along with their answers. He also explains how advances in genetic knowledge may lead to ethical and privacy concerns.

    Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos:


    All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing:
    File:Alice's Restaurant.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, December 18, 2012.
    File:Autosomal DOminant Pedigree Chart.svg, n.d.
    File:Basal Ganglia and Related Structures.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013.
    File:Bendable Thumb.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Ingrid Moller.jpg, n.d.
    File:Meiosis Overview.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Neuron with mHtt Inclusion.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013.
    File:Peas in Pods - Studio.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Snow Pea Flowers.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Woody Guthrie NYWTS.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    Madprime. Genetics Diagram: Punnett Square Describing One of Mendel's Crosses, between Parents That Are Heterozygous for the Purple/white Color Alleles., May 5, 2007. Own work.

    Intro Music Atribution
    Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
    Artist: CosmicD
    Link to sound:
    Creative Commons Atribution License

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    Introduction to Population Genetics - Lynn Jorde

    1:28:27

    April 9, 2014 - Current Topics in Genome Analysis 2014
    A lecture series covering contemporary areas in genomics and bioinformatics. More:

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    COMLEX USMLE Board Review Lectures Pediatrics Genetics Review

    8:34

    Pediatrics Genetics Review

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    How to use iTunes to find lectures on genetics

    1:52

    This video is a quick guide on how to find and view (or hear) lectures on genetics sourced from iTunes. Several universities have free lectures from experts for download from iTunes. There are other lectures topics. Just search. Enjoy.

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    Basic genetics terms and symbols

    5:54

    This video reviews the basic terminology that you will need to know very well before attending Lectures 8 and 9.

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    5. Molecular Genetics II

    1:14:09

    (April 7, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues his series on molecular genetics in which he discusses domains of mutation and various components of natural selection on a molecular level. He also further assesses gradualism and punctuated equilibrium models of evolution, integrating these theories into an interrelated model of development.


    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    13. Learning: Genetic Algorithms

    47:16

    MIT 6.034 Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2010
    View the complete course:
    Instructor: Patrick Winston

    This lecture explores genetic algorithms at a conceptual level. We consider three approaches to how a population evolves towards desirable traits, ending with ranks of both fitness and diversity. We briefly discuss how this space is rich with solutions.

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
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    Dr Maurice Bichard - The Roslin Computational Genetics Lectures

    1:3:45

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    The future of genetic codes and BRAIN codes

    1:6:08

    The future of genetic codes and BRAIN codes

    Air date: Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 3:00:00 PM

    Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

    Runtime: 01:06:08

    Description: Marshall W. Nirenberg Lecture

    This lecture, established in 2011, recognizes Marshall Nirenberg for his work to decipher the genetic code, which resulted in his receiving the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Nirenberg's research career at the NIH spanned more than 50 years, and his research also focused on neuroscience, neural development, and the homeobox genes. The Nirenberg lecture recognizes outstanding contributions to genetics and molecular biology.

    Dr. Church is a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and director of PersonalGenomes.org, which provides the world's only open-access information on human genomic, environmental, and trait data (GET). His 1984 Harvard Ph.D. thesis included the first methods for direct genome sequencing, molecular multiplexing, and barcoding. These methods led to the first genome sequence (pathogen, Helicobacter pylori) in 1994. His innovations have contributed to nearly all next generation DNA sequencing methods and companies. These innovations plus his lab's work on chip-DNA-synthesis, gene editing, and stem cell engineering resulted in founding additional application-based companies spanning the fields of medical diagnostics and synthetic biology/therapeutics. He has also pioneered new privacy, biosafety, ELSI, environmental, and biosecurity policies. He is director of an IARPA BRAIN Project and the NIH Center for Excellence in Genomic Science. His honors include election to National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He is also a Franklin Bower Laureate for Achievement in Science. He has co-authored 425 papers, 95 patent publications, and one book (Regenesis).

    Dr. Church's lecture will focus on transformative technologies moving at exponential rates for reading, writing and editing genomes, epigenomes, and other omes. Applications include cells resistant to all viruses via new genetic codes, production and analysis of organs for transplantation, and therapy testing.

    For more information go to

    Author: George M. Church, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

    Permanent link:

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    Genetics Lectures

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    COMLEX USMLE Board Review Lectures Pediatric Genetics Autism Aspergers Retts ADHD

    9:44

    COMLEX USMLE

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    Download An Outline of Informational Genetics Synthesis Lectures on Biomedical Engineering

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    Ancient Human Genomes...Present-Day Europeans - Johannes Krause

    1:13:14

    Public Lecture - March 19, 2015
    Johannes Krause
    Professor of Archaeology and Paleogenetics at the University of Tübingen and Director of the Max Plank Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena

    In this lecture, Krause explores the methods used to investigate European population history about the time of agricultural transition. Using genome data, Krause explains how at least three ancestral groups, the Hunter-Gathers, the Early Farmers and the Ancient North Eurasians, contributed genetic material to present-day Europeans. Krause also discusses these three ancestral populations discovered from this data and explores their connection to present-day Europeans. This lecture is made possible by the Dr. S.T. Lee Fund for Historical Studies.

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    genetics lectures 2

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    The feeling after lectures of anatomy & genetics

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    The feeling after lectures of anatomy & genetics

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    Mod-01 Lec-38 Genetic Algorithms

    54:52

    Design and Optimization of Energy Systems by Prof. C. Balaji , Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Madras. For more details on NPTEL visit

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    PATHOLOGY LECTURES genetics PATAU syndrome , EDWARD syndrome TURNER syndrome NOONAN syndrome KLINEFE

    35:11

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    Download An Outline of Informational Genetics Synthesis Lectures on Biomedical Engineering Pdf

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    Donwload An Outline of Informational Genetics Synthesis Lectures on Biomedical Engineering Book

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    Mutations: great and small

    1:2:15

    Royal Society Francis Crick Lecture by Dr Matthew Hurles on 17 October 2013.

    One of the greatest surprises of human genetic research has been the degree to which healthy people vary in the number of genes in their genomes, as a result of gains and losses of large segments of DNA. Generating comprehensive maps of where these variants exist in our genomes has enabled us to identify large common genetic variants that influence our susceptibility to common diseases such as diabetes, as well as to discover large rare genetic variants that can cause a wide range of rare disorders. Dr Hurles will discuss how his investigations of this previously under-appreciated form of genetic variation have helped to shape our current understanding of both the genetic causes of disease, and the mutation processes that edit the genome as it is passed from one generation to the next.

    As a post-doctoral research fellow in population genetics at the University of Cambridge, Dr Hurles was the first to establish the molecular mechanism underlying a recurrent deletion of part of the Y-chromosome, which causes male infertility. In 2003, Dr Hurles joined the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge. Dr Hurles is currently coordinating efforts to apply genome-wide resequencing methods to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases and understand the factors influencing rates of germline mutation.

    The Francis Crick Lecture is given annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick's science. Dr Matthew Hurles was awarded the 2013 Francis Crick Lecture for his outstanding contributions to understanding structural variation in the human genome, the mechanisms that cause this variation and its medical and evolutionary consequences.

    Video cover image: © Svisio/iStock.

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    6. Behavioral Genetics I

    1:38:35

    (April 12, 2010) Robert Sapolsky introduces a two-part series exploring the controversial scientific practice of inferring behavior to genetics. He covers classical techniques in behavior genetics and flaws, the significance of environmental factors, non genetic inheritance of traits, and multigenerational effects and relationship to epigenetic differences.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    DNA Replication | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology

    33:43

    DNA Replication
    Instructor: Eric Lander
    View the complete course:

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
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    PATHOLOGY LECTURES , GENETICS , Part 1

    9:32

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    Is Human Evolution Over? - Professor Steve Jones

    55:57

    Eminent geneticist and scientist, Steve Jones, asks whether humans will evolve in the future: Humans have evolved from ape-like ancestors over millions of years, of course; but also over thousands, for there are several cases in which we can identify natural selection - genetic changes in response to an environmental shift - over just a few millennia. Professor Jones has been criticised for saying that at least in the developed world, and at least for the time being, this process is over. But natural selection depends on differences in survival and reproduction and they have, more or less, gone away. Processes quite different from those of the past will shape our genetic future. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,700 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: Twitter: Facebook:

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    Autism: New Mutations, Genes, and Pathways

    1:6:21

    Autism: New Mutations, Genes, and Pathways

    Air date: Wednesday, February 18, 2015, 3:00:00 PM

    Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

    Runtime: 01:06:20

    Description: NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

    Dr. Eichler will summarize his recent findings regarding the discovery of new genes and genetic mutations that contribute to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays. The lecture will highlight the identification of rare disruptive mutations using copy-number variation from exome- and genome-sequencing approaches on thousands of individuals. He proposes that the early development of the brain is particularly sensitive to the timing and expression of many different genes; multiple genetic perturbations within specific neurodevelopmental pathways can lead to disease with varying severity and predict clinical subtypes of autism. Dr. Eichler will present data on how grouping patients based on a specific gene can be used to predict clinical subtypes of autism. The flood of recent data and candidates provides a powerful path forward for understanding the genetic basis of autism.

    For more information go to

    Author: Evan Eichler, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, and Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

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