Genetics Lectures


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    5. Molecular Genetics II

    1:14:09

    (April 7, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues his series on molecular genetics in which he discusses domains of mutation and various components of natural selection on a molecular level. He also further assesses gradualism and punctuated equilibrium models of evolution, integrating these theories into an interrelated model of development.


    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    3. Behavioral Evolution II

    1:36:59

    (April 2, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues his two-part series on evolution focusing on individual and kin selection, behavioral logic, competitive infanticide, male/female animal hierarchies, sex-ratio fluctuation, intersexual competition, imprinted genes, sperm competition, inbred-founder populations, group and multi-level selection, and punctuated equilibrium.


    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    4th Dimension Explained By A High-School Student

    9:05

    There are many theories out there. This is one of those theories.

    Inspired by Flatlands.

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    Molecular Genetics lecture 1

    7:47

    Transcription

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    6. Behavioral Genetics I

    1:38:35

    (April 12, 2010) Robert Sapolsky introduces a two-part series exploring the controversial scientific practice of inferring behavior to genetics. He covers classical techniques in behavior genetics and flaws, the significance of environmental factors, non genetic inheritance of traits, and multigenerational effects and relationship to epigenetic differences.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    18 Things You Should Know About Genetics

    3:28

    Gene Screen BC 2011 Participant.
    18 Things You Should Know About Genetics is an animated film that presents fundamental background information about genetics, as well as offering some quirky but interesting facts about DNA, genes and genetics. It was created to be an upbeat, fun educational short film to initiate and draw interest to this sometimes daunting and seemingly complex subject matter.

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    Molecular Biology

    14:33

    Paul Andersen explains the major procedures in molecular biology. He starts with a brief description of Taq polymerase extracted from the hot pools of Yellowstone Park. He then uses the analogy of the ransom note to explain each of the processes that are required in genetic engineering. He explains how DNA is cut using restriction enzymes and glued using hydrogen bonds. He explains how gel electrophoresis can be used to sort DNA according to length and how the Polymerase Chain Reaction can be used to copy DNA. He finishes with a brief description of DNA sequencing.

    Intro Music Atribution
    Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
    Artist: CosmicD
    Link to sound:
    Creative Commons Atribution License

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    Professor Sapolsky Explains the Origin of Religion Part 1/2

    8:56

    Professor Sapolsky Explains the Origin of Religion Part 1/2

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    Solving Genetics Problems

    13:36

    Help with basic genetics problems, including the use of the Punnett square and rules of probability to solve monohybrid, dihybrid and even - wait for it - YES, the dreaded trihybrid cross! Unions and intersections, autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and even X-linked recessive inheritance... plus even some relationship advice on the side. All in one video? You bet!

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    The Genetics Myth - Clip from Zeitgeist 3: Moving Forward

    13:57

    Includes interviews with:
    Dr. Robert Sapolsky
    Dr. James Gilligan
    Dr. Gabor Maté
    Richard Wilkinson

    Full Version:


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    Robert Sapolsky, Behave

    7:54

    Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky attempts to answer what drives human behaviors, like racism, xenophobia, tolerance, competition, morality, war, peace, and more.

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    Introduction to Genetics

    2:58

    This HD dramatic video choreographed to powerful music introduces the viewer/student to the science of Genetics and Inheritance. It is designed as a motivational trailer to be shown in classrooms by Biology teachers in middle school, high school and college as a visual Introduction to the history and science of Genetics, Heredity and Biotechnology.

    You can download all of my videos for free from Vimeo, my other video site. The link is available in the About section of this channel.

    Please rate this video and feel free to comment. If you like it, please help me spread the word by posting links on your media websites. The more students who can enjoy these dramatic videos, the better!

    To view all of my videos in Biology, Earth Science, and Astronomy, subscribe to my channel at: I will be releasing new ones periodically.

    I wish to thank all the quality video and music producers whose postings enabled me to assemble this video for educational use. To best enjoy this video, turn up your speakers. The music is very powerful and dramatic!

    I can customize this video to add your name or school name at the end credits, for a very modest fee. If interested, email me at fsgregs@comcast.net

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    TED2017 Robert Sapolsky - The biology of our best and worst selves

    15:56

    How can humans be so compassionate and altruistic — and also so brutal and violent? To understand why we do what we do, neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky looks at extreme context, examining actions on timescales from seconds to millions of years before they occurred. In this fascinating talk, he shares his cutting edge research into the biology that drives our worst and best behaviors.

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    Mendelian Genetics

    16:04

    029 - Mendelian Genetics

    Paul Andersen explains simple Mendelian genetics. He begins with a brief introduction of Gregor Mendel and his laws of segregation and independent assortment. He then presents a number of simple genetics problems along with their answers. He also explains how advances in genetic knowledge may lead to ethical and privacy concerns.

    Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos:


    All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing:
    File:Alice's Restaurant.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, December 18, 2012.
    File:Autosomal DOminant Pedigree Chart.svg, n.d.
    File:Basal Ganglia and Related Structures.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013.
    File:Bendable Thumb.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Ingrid Moller.jpg, n.d.
    File:Meiosis Overview.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Neuron with mHtt Inclusion.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 29, 2013.
    File:Peas in Pods - Studio.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Snow Pea Flowers.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    File:Woody Guthrie NYWTS.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed December 1, 2013.
    Madprime. Genetics Diagram: Punnett Square Describing One of Mendel's Crosses, between Parents That Are Heterozygous for the Purple/white Color Alleles., May 5, 2007. Own work.

    Intro Music Atribution
    Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
    Artist: CosmicD
    Link to sound:
    Creative Commons Atribution License

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    10. Introduction to Neuroscience I

    1:36

    (April 21, 2010) Nathan Woodling and Anthony Chung-Ming Ng give a broad overview of the field of neuroscience and how it relates to human biology. They discuss the different lobes of the brain and the cells within as well as neuropharmacology and re-uptake.


    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    Religion is a Mental Illness Dr Sapolsky

    19:07

    Dr Sapolsky explores schizophrenia to see if there is any hidden adaptive advantage in the condition as there are with so many other genetic disorders. Disorders where the full maladapted trait is extremely harmful to the individual but where a lower partial level of the same trait clearly has adaptive benefits.

    Harvard psychiatrists undertook an extensive study of over 10 000 families in Denmark, speaking with the largest number of schizophrenics and their families ever, and over the period of a decade they noticed something quite remarkable. The family members, the biological relatives of the schizophrenics displayed a very high incidence of schizotypal characteristic behaviour, differing from the full schizophrenia where life is at times impossible, these characters instead were withdrawn and had a strong tendency towards metamagical thinking.

    They were the type of characters to be obsessed with science fiction fantasy or new age beliefs that were so extreme they took things to another level, taking things to be very literal. Typically the religiously leaning schizotypal accepts the seven day creation story, not as metaphorical, but as fact. The same with the resurrection, not symbolic of continued life or anything, it actually happened. Schizotypal personality traits as a mild form of schizophrenia is a recognised diagnosis.

    Robert Raven an anthropologist first highlighted this schizotypalism with the shamans and witch doctors, medicine men and women of so called primitive civilizations and religious beliefs. Extreme behaviour, speaking to the dead, talking in tongues and all the other strange and not so wonderful behaviours attached to religion. The characters with the full blown schizophrenia, provided the balance was right, were and are highly regarded members of society.

    I think you can see where this is leading, from the pages of the National Geographic magazine to our own societies and those who invented theology were schizotypal/schizophrenic personalities. The main tenets of religion are very closely related to obsessive compulsive disorders, rituals, cleanliness. It's a superb lecture and very interesting.

    antitheist atheist opposing religious harm



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    Robert Plomin - Genetics and Education

    9:53

    Robert Plomin discusses the impact of his research on schools.

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    13. Advanced Neurology and Endocrinology

    1:13:01

    (April 28, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues the exploration of endocrinology and neurology. He looks at more complicated systems of communication within neurobiology, the limbic system's role in personality and behavior, abnormal behavior possibilities within these systems, and individual organism variation and imprinting.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    Why Zebras Dont Get Ulcers: Stress and Health by Dr. Robert Sapolsky

    1:27:44

    Science writer, biologist, neuroscientist, and stress expert Dr. Robert Sapolsky presents the inaugural Fenton-Rhodes Lecture on Proactve Wellness.

    Sapolsky states that our bodies' stress response evolved to help us get out of short-term physical emergencies - if a lion is chasing you, you run. But such reactions, he points out, compromise long-term physical health in favor of immediate self-preservation. Unfortunately, when confronted with purely psychological stressors, such as troubleshooting the fax machine, modern humans turn on the same stress response. If you turn it on for too long, notes Sapolsky, you get sick. Sapolsky regards this sobering news with characteristic good humor, finding hope in our own capacity to prevent some of these problems... in the small steps with which we live our everyday lives.

    This lecture was recorded on September 22, 2016 at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts' Colwell Playhouse as part of the Pygmalion TechFest

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    Molecular genetics

    16:35

    Alexmed medical school

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    15. Human Sexual Behavior I

    1:41:43

    May 5, 2010) Robert Sapolsky explores behavioral patterns of human reproduction. He focuses on proximal and distal motivations, orgasm and fertility facilitation, non-reproductive sex, hormonal and cerebral sexual functions, and the differences and similarities between humans and animals in various physiological realms.

    Stanford University:


    Stanford Department of Biology:


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

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    Intro to Genetics

    28:57

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    Mitochondrial Genetics of Aging - Konstantin Khrapko

    13:53

    Source -

    Harvard Associate Prof. Konstantin Khrapko mutations in non-nuclear DNA, substantia nigra, and aging of Drosophila’s intestine

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    Behave by Robert Sapolsky, PhD

    57:16

    NEED DESCRIPTION

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    DNA - Episode 1 of 5: The Secret of Life - PBS Documentary

    53:01

    The discovery of double-helix structure of DNA is to science what Mona Lisa is to painting. It has been called the single biggest discovery of all times. But it was not just stumbled upon - it was a race.

    Specifically, it was a race between two teams of young scientists working in Britain. Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins were trying to identify the structure by studying X-ray diffractions of the DNA molecule. But Jim Watson and Francis Crick studied a little bit of everything -- including, to the consternation of some, the work of their competitors. A few have gone so far as to accuse Watson of stealing Franklin's X-ray work.

    In any case, Waston and Crick's inquisitive working style ultimately allowed them to determine the DNA structure first, in 1953 -- an achievement that led to their Nobel Prize in 1962. Meanwhile, Franklin passed away in 1958 from cancer.

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    Alternative Approaches to Molecular Biology | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology

    35:02

    Alternative Approaches to Molecular Biology
    Instructor: Eric Lander
    View the complete course:

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    More information at
    More courses at

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    Stanford researchers develop algorithm to diagnose heart arrhythmias

    2:11

    Life-threatening heart arrhythmias can be difficult to detect but a new deep learning algorithm can evaluate each second of a heart signal and diagnose 14 types of arrhythmia with performance similar to that of cardiologists.

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    Robert Sapolsky Interview: Toxoplasmosis

    24:27

    Robert Sapolsky on Toxoplasmosis, interviewed by Edge TV. The cellular interference noises stop after 3:30. Sorry about that.

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    Stanford researchers develop vine-like, growing robot

    2:47

    Mechanical engineers at Stanford have developed a robot that grows
    like a vine. It’s ability to grow across distances without moving its whole body could be useful in search and rescue and medical applications.

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    XII MOLECULAR BASIS OF INHERITANCE

    37:39

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    Fear Factory: Stanford neurobiologists use VR to explore our responses to stress, anxiety, and fear

    5:29

    Andrew Huberman of Stanford University School of Medicine is studying the neuroscience of how what we see influences our emotions, especially fear.

    Using virtual reality (VR), he exposes study participants to terrifying scenarios, including attack encounters with sharks, spiders, and a pit bull, and stepping off a very high, narrow plank.

    Huberman, an associate professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at Stanford, measures participant responses with sensors attached to their skin, by monitoring their pupil diameters, and by simply asking participants to say what they’re feeling.

    He aims to test techniques that, if successful, could help people with phobias, generalized anxiety syndrome, or post-traumatic stress disorder recover their composure in situations that trigger fear.

    Read the Stanford Medicine Magazine article here:

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    Tony Robbins: UPGRADE YOUR VALUES

    34:10

    Tony Robbins: UPGRADE YOUR VALUES (Tony Robbins motivation)
    “The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be.” –- Ralph Waldo Emerson

    What would your values need to be to create your ultimate destiny and live your best life?

    That’s the question Tony Robbins asked himself long ago.

    Before that, he was living his values.

    But all that meant was that he had good clarity of the values that had been conditioned and programmed into him over his life.

    Consciously Choose Your Values and Prioritize Them

    He realized that to be the best person he could possibly be, he would need to consciously choose his values and prioritize them.

    And this is the heart of profound change and personal transformation.

    In the book, Awaken the Giant Within: How to Take Immediate Control of Your Mental, Emotional, Physical and Financial Destiny, Tony Robbins shares what he learned about changing his values to shape and create his ultimate destiny.
    *CREDIT
    Tony Robbins
    Visit Tony Robbins' websites:



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    1)This video has no negative impact on the original works
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    The biology of our best and worst selves | Robert Sapolsky

    15:52

    How can humans be so compassionate and altruistic -- and also so brutal and violent? To understand why we do what we do, neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky looks at extreme context, examining actions on timescales from seconds to millions of years before they occurred. In this fascinating talk, he shares his cutting edge research into the biology that drives our worst and best behaviors.

    The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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    Most Common Admissions Question about the Stanford Anesthesiology Residency

    2:01

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    Stanfords Sapolsky On Depression in U.S.

    52:29

    Stanford Professor Robert Sapolsky, posits that depression is the most damaging disease that you can experience. Right now it is the number four cause of disability in the US and it is becoming more common. Sapolsky states that depression is as real of a biological disease as is diabetes.

    Stanford University:


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

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    25. Individual Differences

    53:54

    (June 2, 2010) Professor Robert Sapolsky gives the final lecture in the Human Biology 160 class. He uses the lecture to wrap up any loose ends and show how the themes of the class connects without the more complex concepts that were brought up throughout the course.

    Stanford University:


    Stanford Department of Biology:


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

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    Genetics and Intelligence

    1:6:31

    Google Tech Talk (more info below)
    August 18, 2011

    Presented by Steve Hsu.

    How do genes affect cognitive ability? I begin with a brief review of psychometric measurements of intelligence, introducing the idea of a general factor or IQ score. The main results concern the stability, validity (predictive power), and heritability of adult IQ. Next, I discuss ongoing Genome Wide Association Studies which investigate the genetic basis of intelligence. Due mainly to the rapidly decreasing cost of sequencing, it is likely that within the next 5-10 years we will identify genes which account for a significant fraction of total IQ variation.

    We are currently seeking volunteers for a study of high cognitive ability. Participants will receive free genotyping.

    Speaker Info:

    Steve Hsu is Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Oregon and Director of its Institute of Theoretical Science. Educated at Caltech and Berkeley, he was a Harvard Junior Fellow and Assistant Professor at Yale before moving to Oregon in 1998. He is also the founder of two Silicon Valley software startups in the area of information security. He serves as Scientific Advisor to the Cognitive Genomics Lab of BGI (formerly the Beijing Genomics Institute), one of the leading genomics research centers in the world.

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    pathophysiology 12 Molecular genetics overview

    31:39

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    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps | MIT 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology

    38:55

    Linkage and Recombination, Genetic maps
    Instructor: Eric Lander
    View the complete course:

    License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    More information at
    More courses at

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    5 Awesome Tips on How to Travel Southeast Asia - Backpacking Tricks

    16:59

    Hey Refusers - shot this quick video in vietnam about my top five tips for backpackers traveling in southeast asia. If you've ever wanted to travel the world or backpack, DO NOT MISS THIS VIDEO!

    Here's the app I mention:Get a FREE $5 and automate your travel savings with my favorite app, Qapital here:
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    Want more travel advice? Check out these two videos on how to backpack southeast asia:

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    Stanford Anesthesiology: Our Special Environment

    1:29

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    1. Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

    57:15

    (March 29, 2010) Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky gave the opening lecture of the course entitled Human Behavioral Biology and explains the basic premise of the course and how he aims to avoid categorical thinking.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    What Does the Stanford Anesthesiology Admissions Committee Look For?

    1:14

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    how i studied for my bio SAT

    4:31

    lung stuff.......which is kinda related to the heart stuff

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    The Genetics of Adam & Eve: Mitochondria & Molecular Clocks - Georgia Purdom & Kevin Anderson

    21:05

    Related uploads:

    Human & Chimpanzee DNA: 99% Similar? - Georgia Purdom & Kevin Anderson:

    Chromosome 2 Fusion: Evidence for Evolution?:

    Human Evolution?:

    Ape to Man Fossils - Jonathan Wells:

    The Garden of Eden: History or Fantasy?:

    The Myth of Race:

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    Specialty Tracks Available to Stanford Anesthesiology Residents

    1:09

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    Stanford class brings performance to the Anderson Collection

    2:17

    The latest Dance Improv Strategies Lab taught students that performance can happen anywhere at anytime. It could be at a theater or dance hall, or a less traditional venue like a museum or even a city street. For their final project, students chose any area in or around the Anderson Collection at Stanford University and created a performance to work in tandem with the modern art museum.

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    2. Behavioral Evolution

    1:36:58

    (March 31, 2010) Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky lectures on the biology of behavioral evolution and thoroughly discusses examples such as The Prisoner's Dilemma.

    Stanford University


    Stanford Department of Biology


    Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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    Stanford exhibit explores mid-century modern design

    2:42

    A major exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center presents a fascinating new perspective on the creation and production of mid-century modern design. Creativity on the Line: Design for the Corporate World, 1950–1975, explores the groundbreaking work of American designers. While these designers have been highly regarded for their innovations in classic works of modern design, this exhibition and its accompanying catalogue instead focus on the relationship between the designers and top management in the large corporations for which they worked.

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