Freakonomics Radio Podcast


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    Freakonomics Radio - The Economics of Sleep, Part 2

    43:25

    People who sleep better earn more money. Now all we have to do is teach everyone to sleep

    better.

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    Freakonomics Radio - How to Be More Productive

    38:37

    Freakonomics - How to Be More Productive

    It's Self-Improvement Month at Freakonomics Radio. We begin with a topic that seems to be on

    everyone's mind: how to get more done in less time. First, however, a warning: there's a big

    difference between being busy and being productive.

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    The freakonomics of McDonalds vs. drugs | Steven Levitt

    22:01

    Freakonomics author Steven Levitt presents new data on the finances of drug dealing. Contrary to popular myth, he says, being a street-corner crack dealer isnt lucrative: It pays below minimum wage. And your boss can kill you.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers are invited to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes -- including speakers such as Jill Bolte Taylor, Sir Ken Robinson, Hans Rosling, Al Gore and Arthur Benjamin. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, politics and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at

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    Freakonomics Radio - Is the World Ready for a Guaranted Basic Income?

    37:17

    A lot of full-time jobs in the modern economy simply don't pay a living wage. And even those

    jobs may be obliterated by new technologies. What's to be done so that financially vulnerable

    people aren't just crushed? It may finally be time for an idea that economists have promoted

    for decades.

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    Solving Problems with Data - Freakonomics Co-Author Stephen Dubner #JOINData 2016

    19:14

    Hear Part 3 of Stephen Dubner's Keynote session at #JOINData 2016

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He is best-known as co-author of the books in the Freakonomics series, including Freakonomics, SuperFreakonomics, Think Like a Freak and When to Rob a Bank. They have sold more than 7 million copies in more than 40 countries. Dubner is also the host of the Freakonomics Radio podcast, which gets 5 million downloads a month.

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    Discovering Interesting Data with Freakonomics Co-Author Stephen Dubner #JOINData 2016

    13:35

    Hear Part 1 of Stephen Dubner's Keynote session at #JOINData 2016

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He is best-known as co-author of the books in the Freakonomics series, including Freakonomics, SuperFreakonomics, Think Like a Freak and When to Rob a Bank. They have sold more than 7 million copies in more than 40 countries. Dubner is also the host of the Freakonomics Radio podcast, which gets 5 million downloads a month.

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    Freakonomics: What Prostitutes Can Teach About Economics

    5:02

    Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics, recounts a story of talking economics and business practice with a prostitute while researching for SuperFreakonomics.

    Complete video available for free at

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    Why Uber Is an Economist’s Dream

    39:54

    To you, it’s just a ride-sharing app that gets you where you’re going. But to an economist, Uber is a massive repository of moment-by-moment data that is helping answer some of the field’s most elusive questions.

    Thanks For Watching!

    Download The Podcast:

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    The Monkey Economy: Freakonomics Radio Live in St. Paul

    5:35

    Stephen Dubner describes the research of Keith Chen and his experiments with the monkey economy. Monkeys were taught to use money by economists to buy different commodities, hilarity ensues.

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    Freakonomics 6

    6:48

    A look at everyday experiences in freaky ways based on the bestselling book Freakonomics.

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    Freakonomics Movie Trailer Official

    2:32

    - Follow Us!

    Freakonomics hits theaters on October 1st, 2010.

    FREAKONOMICS is the highly anticipated film version of the phenomenally bestselling book about incentives-based thinking by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. Like the book, the film examines human behavior with provocative and sometimes hilarious case studies, bringing together a dream team of filmmakers responsible for some of the most acclaimed and entertaining documentaries in recent years: Academy Award® winner Alex Gibney (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Casino Jack and the United States of Money), Academy Award® nominees Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing (Jesus Camp), Academy Award® nominee Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me), Eugene Jarecki (Why We Fight) and Seth Gordon (The King of Kong).

    Freakonomics trailer courtesy Magnolia Pictures.

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    Why Are We Still Using Cash?

    44:48

    It facilitates crime, bribery, and tax evasion – and yet some governments (including ours) are printing more cash than ever. Other countries, meanwhile, are ditching cash entirely. And if Star Trek is right, we won’t have money of any sort in the 24th century.

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    Freakonomics 1

    5:46

    A look at everyday experiences in freaky ways based on the bestselling book Freakonomics.

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    Freakonomics 2

    7:27

    A look at everyday experiences in freaky ways based on the bestselling book Freakonomics.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Are Payday Loans Really as Evil as People Say?

    49:41

    Critics -- including President Obama -- say short-term, high-interest loans are predatory,

    trapping borrowers in a cycle of debt. But some economists see them as a useful financial

    instrument for people who need them. As the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau promotes new

    regulation, we ask: who's right?

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    The Economics of Sex

    9:56

    Like the Austin Institute on Facebook:
    Follow the Austin Institute on Twitter:
    The Research:

    This Research Animate pulls together some of the key sexual economics arguments made by social scientists, including Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs, Timothy Reichert, Mark Regnerus, and George Akerlof.

    Essential to the mission of the Austin Institute is the dissemination of both thought-provoking and rigorous academic research on family, sexuality, social structures and human relationships. In order to engage a wider audience, we are developing select research projects into a medium amenable to our digital age.

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    White Names vs. Black Names: Freakonomics Movie

    2:12

    What's in a name? Roland Fryer explains the bifurcation of naming in Caucasian communities and black communities.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Episode 41 Open Case from Criminal on podbay

    24:09

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    Abortions and Crime: Freakonomics Movie

    4:26

    Levitt takes you through his research on the relationship between dropping crime and the legalization of abortion.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Freakonomics: Three Geoengineering Solutions to Global Warming

    7:05

    Complete video at:

    Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, authors of SuperFreakonomics, argue that the simplest solution to global warming involves geoengineering technologies that reflect a percentage of sunlight away from the Earth. Levitt describes why he prioritizes this technological solution over carbon reduction.

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    With Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner revealed the good, bad, ugly and super freaky of the world around us.

    The freakquel is here. Back with more than pop-culture trivia, Inforum's next 21st Century Visionary Award recipients are ready to revolutionize our understanding of causality in an incredibly interconnected world. - Commonwealth Club of California

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author and journalist who lives in New York City. He is the co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. He is also the author of Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family (1998), Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper (2003), and a children's book, The Boy With Two Belly Buttons (2007).

    Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.

    Levitt received his BA from Harvard University in 1989 and his PhD from MIT in 1994. He has taught at Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded to the most influential economist under the age of 40. In 2006, he was named one of Time magazine's 100 People Who Shape Our World.

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    NB1. Top 10 Basic Concepts of Economics

    14:37

    Episode 1: No Bull Review's Macroeconomics and Microeconomics podcast - Top 10 things you must know for the first unit of economics class. This is geared toward college-level principles of macro and micro courses and students enrolled in AP Economics.
    ___
    Top 10 Basic Concepts:
    #1. Scarcity
    #2. Opportunity Cost
    #3. Production Possibilities Curve
    #4. Law of Increasing Cost
    #5. Absolute vs. Comparative Advantage
    #6. Diminishing Marginal Utility
    #7. Supply and Demand
    #8. Shortage vs. Surplus
    #9. Shifts in Demand and Supply
    #10. Dual Shifts of Demand and Supply
    ___
    Website:

    eBook:

    Twitter: @mrmedicoinfo

    Instagram: @mrmedico
    ___
    About Mr. Medico:
    Mr. Medico is an Economics educator in New York with over a decade of classroom experience. He is the author of No Bull Review - Macroeconomics and Microeconomics: For use with the AP Macroeconomics and AP Microeconomics Exams (2012) and No Bull Review - Macroeconomics and Microeconomics: Top 10 Guide (2014). Mr. Medico is the developer of several best-selling iPhone test prep apps from Study By App, LLC, including Economics AP (2010), Economics AP Free (2011), and Economics Flashcard Review (2011). In 2010, he contributed to WNYC Radio/Public Radio International's morning news program The Takeaway and was recently a featured guest on episode 27 of the Economics Rockstar podcast. Mr. Medico is the Macroeconomics instructor for the Junior State of America summer school at Princeton University.

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    Episode 40 Pappy from Criminal on podbay

    24:32

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    How to Become an Amateur Economist

    4:52

    (First list to Economics in One Video -

    Alex Merced describes many podcasts anyone interested in economics should listen to when learning more about Economics:

    EconTalk with Russ Roberts
    NPR Planet Money
    Demand Side with Alan Harvey
    Mises Daily
    AEI Podcast
    Peterson Institute Podcast
    Freedomain Radio
    The Economist Podcast
    The Invisible Hand Podcast
    Reason.Tv Podcast
    University of Chicago Law School Podcast
    SchiffRadio

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    Episode 39 Either Or from Criminal on podbay

    26:28

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    Small Batch Remembering Prince from Pop Culture Happy Hour on p

    11:59

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    What is Keynesian Economics?

    8:22

    Randall Hinton of discusses how Keynesian economic theories are used by the US governement to determine when and where to spend money, or stimulate the economy. Although many (if not all) of Keyne's theories have been proven to be fallacious, the government seems bent on their continued justification for its fiscal irresponsibility. In our video we give a brief overview of these theories and their effects on the market. Contrasted with the Austrian view of economics. Join him in his bid for the U.S. House of Representatives

    To see more subscribe to our Video Podcast:


    Thanks for Watching

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    Russ Roberts: Why Keynesians Always Get it Wrong

    6:09

    Economics as practiced by most of the profession...is full of hubris and should be much more full of humility, says former George Mason University economist Russ Roberts, NPR commentator, host of the popular podcast Econ Talk, blogger at Cafe Hayek, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution.

    Throughout the fiscal crisis, Roberts has attacked economic stimulus plans promulgated by left-of-center Keynesians and right-of-center monetarists. Such plans, he says, almost always fail to deliver the desired results because they're predicated on a fundamentally flawed understanding of the economy as a single entity that can be directed one way or another.

    Which isn't to say that there aren't better or worse policies to follow. We may not be able to control the economy says Roberts, but we can make it easier for it to function by following what he calls general principles that are pretty timeless such as a government that lives within its means and investors who are held accountable when their investments go bust.

    Reason TV's Nick Gillespie sat down with Roberts to discuss the failure of macroeconomics, his move from the free-market bastion George Mason University to Hoover Institution, and his new online project, The Numbers Game.

    About 6 minutes.

    Produced by Joshua Swain, with help from Amanda Winkler.

    Go to Reason.tv for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason TV's YouTube channel to receive automatic notification when new material goes live.

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    Whats More Dangerous: Drunk Walking or Drunk Driving?

    3:36

    Complete video at:

    SuperFreakonomics authors Steve Levitt and Stephen Dubner cite statistics that show, on a per mile basis, walking drunk is more deadly than driving drunk. Friends don't let friends walk drunk, cautions Dubner.

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    With Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner revealed the good, bad, ugly and super freaky of the world around us.

    The freakquel is here. Back with more than pop-culture trivia, Inforum's next 21st Century Visionary Award recipients are ready to revolutionize our understanding of causality in an incredibly interconnected world. - Commonwealth Club of California

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author and journalist who lives in New York City. He is the co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. He is also the author of Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family (1998), Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper (2003), and a children's book, The Boy With Two Belly Buttons (2007).

    Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.

    Levitt received his BA from Harvard University in 1989 and his PhD from MIT in 1994. He has taught at Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded to the most influential economist under the age of 40. In 2006, he was named one of Time magazine's 100 People Who Shape Our World.

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    Pop Culture Happy Hour - Best Bad Movies and a Quiz

    41:18

    Best Bad Movies and a Quiz

    Trey Graham returns to PCHH for a discussion of the best bad movies. Then, Glen Weldon tests the panel in a top-secret quiz. Plus, what's making us happy this week.

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    Fall Fast Asleep With Strange Soothing Sleep Podcast A Walking Tour of Lost Island

    1:4:44

    Remember the popular TV show Lost? Good, because your tour guide might not have all the fact down. But the tour will be long, lulling and dull. Return to the island where it all started...as a tourist.

    Chapters:
    00:00:00 Intro
    00:04:50 Thanks
    00:13:04 Redittation begins
    00:27:28 Vest
    00:31:20 Assassins Creed
    00:34:07 Flashback
    00:38:54 FCC
    00:42:52 Paddy
    00:45:41 Move to country
    00:49:33 Iron Shiek
    00:50:29 Squad cast
    00:54:00 Stop Motion
    00:56:41 Snow Dog
    00:58:34 Forensics
    01:00:23 Camp
    01:01:42 Colbert Star Wars

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    Economist Potty Training: Freakonomics Movie

    2:50

    Levitt's incentive scheme for potty training his daughter Amanda backfires.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Sleep deprivation & disparities in health, economic and social wellbeing: Lauren Hale at TEDxSBU

    18:03

    Is anyone getting enough sleep? What difference does it make? Everyone knows what it feels like when you have a rough night but are there larger implications? Sleep researcher, Dr. Lauren Hale, talks animatedly about the social patterning of sleep and how it contributes to a cycle of inequality in health and well-being. With funding from National Institute for Child Health and Development, National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the National Institute of Aging, she analyzes demographic, behavioral, and neighborhood data from large-scale studies to identify patterns of sleep and wellness in child, adolescent, adult, and aging populations. Dr. Hale suggests that the results raise concerns about public health and social justice; she also presents some initial thoughts on what we, as individuals and a society, might do about it. Dr. Hale has published over 45 published peer-reviewed articles in Sleep, Sleep Medicine Reviews, Journal of Sleep Research, Pediatrics, among numerous other peer-reviewed journals. Dr.Hale is Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine at Stony Brook University where she is Core Faculty in the Program in Public Health. She received her PhD from Princeton University. She also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Sleep Foundation.

    In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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    Steven Levitt on child carseats

    20:32

    Steven Levitt shares data that shows car seats are no more effective than seatbelts in protecting kids from dying in cars. However, during the Q&A, he makes one crucial caveat.

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    Economies of South East Asia

    24:07

    Ross O'Brien speaks to Joe Studwell, author of How Asia Works, about the status and outlook of some of SOuth East Asia's economies.

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    Freakonomics: How Often Do MDs Really Wash Their Hands?

    3:38

    Complete video at:

    SuperFreakonomics authors Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt reveal disturbing statistics on how often hospital doctors actually wash their hands. Levitt discusses how one hospital successfully addressed the issue by growing petri dish cultures from some particularly grimy hands.

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    With Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner revealed the good, bad, ugly and super freaky of the world around us.

    The freakquel is here. Back with more than pop-culture trivia, Inforum's next 21st Century Visionary Award recipients are ready to revolutionize our understanding of causality in an incredibly interconnected world. - Commonwealth Club of California

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author and journalist who lives in New York City. He is the co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. He is also the author of Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family (1998), Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper (2003), and a children's book, The Boy With Two Belly Buttons (2007).

    Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.

    Levitt received his BA from Harvard University in 1989 and his PhD from MIT in 1994. He has taught at Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded to the most influential economist under the age of 40. In 2006, he was named one of Time magazine's 100 People Who Shape Our World.

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    Small Batch Another Rounds Heben Nigatu and Tracy Clayton from

    17:00

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    Freakonomics Radio - How Stupid Is Our Obsession With Lawns?

    28:04

    Freakonomics Radio - How Stupid Is Our Obsession With Lawns?

    Nearly two percent of America is grassy green. Sure, lawns are beautiful and useful and they smell great. But are the costs — financial, environmental and otherwise — worth the benefits?

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    Pop Culture Happy Hour - Small Batch Comedian Josh Gondelman

    12:34

    Small Batch: Comedian Josh Gondelman

    Linda Holmes chat with Josh Gondelman, and stand-up comedian and writer for Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. His album Physical Whisper is available now.

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    NPR Politics Podcast - Inside HBOs Confirmation When NPR Broke

    30:06

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    Wolf Richter: The Economy Is Cracking Under Too Much Debt

    47:28

    Full Description and Comments at:

    Wolf Richter joins the podcast this week to discuss the deterioration of the global macro situation, and how he is seeing growing signs of recession breaking out across the economy.

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    ACU 1297 Freakonomics Rogue Economist Documentary

    1:33:03

    Several documentary directors each film a segment representing one chapter of Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner's best-seller Freakonomics. This podcast is audio of these film segments

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    The Best of Freakonomics

    1:11:54

    Subscribe for more videos like this:

    The Best of Freakonomics with Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, moderated by Faith Salie.

    Follow us on Facebook:
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    NPR Politics Podcast - Quick Take April 26 Primary Results

    12:13

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    Pop Culture Happy Hour - Small Batch The Real Housewives of Potomac

    17:00

    Small Batch: The Real Housewives of Potomac

    Brittany Luse and Eric Eddings, hosts of the For Colored Nerds podcast, join Linda Holmes for a chat about the Real Housewives of Potomac.

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    NPR Politics Podcast - Quick Take New York Primary Results

    12:51

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    Beyond Freakonomics: New Musings on the Economics of Everyday Life

    56:12

    Steven Levitt, co-author of Freakonomics and professor in economics at the University of Chicago, discusses his latest research

    (Sep 27, 2006 at Princeton University)

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    Freakonomics Podcast: Marijuana or Alcohol

    3:11

    A video on the dangers of marijuana compared to alcohol by Arthur Lee and Jerry Jen

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    When to Rob a Bank, with Freakonomics’ Stephen J. Dubner

    3:44

    No, Stephen J. Dubner doesn't actually endorse bank robbery. What he does endorse is amusing deconstructions of cultural acts or items -- robbing banks, for instance -- and analyzing data to stumble upon intriguing observations. Dubner's latest book is When to Rob a Bank (

    Read more at BigThink.com:

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    Transcript - So if your question is when to rob a bank which plainly is our question – that’s what we titled the book, you think about a few things. You think about, you know, time of day, day of week, part of the year and so on. And this grew out of the fact that I’d read about a bank robber in New Jersey who was finally arrested after robbing banks on six Thursdays. And it made me wonder maybe Thursday is the best day to rob a bank. Maybe he knew something about the way the bank operated. Maybe that was his day off, whatever. So I went looking into the bank robbery data itself because that’s kind of what we do is look at data and see what’s interesting and this one was more, you know, we weren’t searching for this before the question arose. And so it turns out that the data are kind of fun to play with. It turns out that bank robberies are most – the most common day is Friday which I guess people, it makes sense because people think it’s payday and there’s a lot of money coming in and going out. But that doesn’t necessarily mean, you know, you’ll be more likely to be successful on Friday. There’s really no big difference in success rates from day of week. But you are much more likely to get more money if you rob a bank in the morning than in the afternoon.

    And yet most bank robbers work in the afternoon and not the morning which leads you to think well either bank robbers aren’t very good at profit maximizing, you know, thinking the way economists do or that maybe they just can’t get up in the morning and go to work bank robbing which means that maybe if they could get up in the morning early in the first place they wouldn’t have to resort to bank robbery. But the real answer to when to rob a bank is never. And never is the right answer because the ROI or the return on investment on bank robbery is terrible. So if you’re going to become a criminal bank robbery is a bad crime. The average haul is about $4,000 in the U.S. per bank robbery. In the UK it’s substantially more so you could consider that. And you’re likely to get arrested after just three bank robberies and sent to prison. So you have to think as a career move bank robbery is really dreadful. And then one other tangent that we got involved with on this and looking into bank robberies is internal, you know, inside jobs. And one of the most interesting ones we came across was a woman in Iowa who for years and years and years had been embezzling money from a bank, about two million dollars’ worth. And the bank was actually owned – the president of the bank was her father interestingly. So I don’t know what the dynamics were there. And the way she was finally caught – and it turns out that she kept two sets of books which is kind of how you want to embezzle. And she was exhausted when she was caught.

    The reason she was exhausted was because she’s worked so hard. She’d never taken a vacation over all those years. And the reason was that she was scared to because if she took a vacation someone would find that she’d been keeping two sets of books and she would have been found out. So what was interesting is she went to prison for a few years. She was let out. She moved back in with her parents who were obviously very forgiving since it was the dad’s bank that she had kind of put into trouble. And then she went to work with law enforcement. And what I love about this is it’s the classic tale of – only someone who knows how to cheat or how to steal or how to lie or rob would know how to help the good guys catch the bad guys from doing it. So she went to work for law enforcement and they found that one of the best metrics to look for in preventing white collar crime generally in embezzlement, particularly it was people who took, who didn’t take vacations or who took really strange vacations. So if in your firm you see that someone is passing up on their vacation time you shouldn’t necessarily think of them as just like a super hard worker or an altruist to your company. You might want to take a look in their drawer and see if they’re keeping a second set of books.

    Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Elizabeth Rodd, and Aaron Lehmann

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