Freakonomics Radio Podcast


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    Freakonomics Radio - Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Money

    44:06

    Freakonomics Radio Aug 02, 2017 - Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Money (But Were Afraid to Ask)

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Money (But Were Afraid to Ask).” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)
    The bad news: roughly 70 percent of Americans are financially illiterate. The good news: all the important stuff can fit on one index card. Here’s how to become your own financial superhero.
    Below is a transcript of the episode, modified for your reading pleasure. For more information on the people and ideas in the episode, see the links at the bottom of this post. And you’ll find credits for the music in the episode noted within the transcript.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Why Hate the Koch Brothers?

    43:25

    Freakonomics Radio - Why Hate the Koch Brothers? (Part 1)

    Charles Koch, the mega-billionaire CEO of Koch Industries and half of the infamous political machine, sees himself as a classical liberal. So why do most Democrats hate him so much? In a rare series of interviews, he explains his political awakening, his management philosophy and why he supports legislation that goes against his self-interest.

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    The freakonomics of McDonalds vs. drugs | Steven Levitt

    22:01

    Freakonomics author Steven Levitt presents new data on the finances of drug dealing. Contrary to popular myth, he says, being a street-corner crack dealer isnt lucrative: It pays below minimum wage. And your boss can kill you.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers are invited to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes -- including speakers such as Jill Bolte Taylor, Sir Ken Robinson, Hans Rosling, Al Gore and Arthur Benjamin. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, politics and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at

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    Freakonomics Radio July 19, 2017 - These Shoes Are Killing Me!

    39:20

    Freakonomics Radio July 19, 2017 - These Shoes Are Killing Me!

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “These Shoes Are Killing Me!” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)
    The human foot is an evolutionary masterpiece, far more functional than we give it credit for. So why do we encase it in “a coffin” (as one foot scholar calls it) that stymies so much of its ability — and may create more problems than it solves?

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    Freakonomics Radio - Are the Rich Really Less Generous Than the Poor?

    43:58

    Freakonomics Radio - Are the Rich Really Less Generous Than the Poor?

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Are the Rich Really Less Generous Than the Poor?” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed or listen via the media player above.)
    A series of academic studies suggest that the wealthy are, to put it bluntly, selfish jerks. It’s an easy narrative to swallow — but is it true? A trio of economists set out to test the theory. All it took was a Dutch postal worker’s uniform, some envelopes stuffed with cash, and a slight sense of the absurd.

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    Freakonomics Radio 2017 - How Big is My Penis?

    34:28

    Freakonomics Radio 2017 - How Big is My Penis? (And Other Things We Ask Google)

    On the Internet, people say all kinds of things they'd never say aloud -- about sex and race, about their true wants and fears. Seth Stephens-Davidowitz has spent years parsing the data. His conclusion: our online searches are the reflection of our true selves. In the real world, everybody lies.

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    Freakonomics Radio - How Stupid Is Our Obsession With Lawns?

    28:04

    Freakonomics Radio - How Stupid Is Our Obsession With Lawns?

    Nearly two percent of America is grassy green. Sure, lawns are beautiful and useful and they smell great. But are the costs — financial, environmental and otherwise — worth the benefits?

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    The Dumbest Thing You Could Buy - Grant Rant #275

    2:58

    Subscribe and comment to qualify for a FREE personal finance coaching session with Grant Cardone.

    GRANT RANT: The Dumbest Thing You Could Buy—I want to tell you a secret. The dumbest thing you can buy is a big expensive luxury car like my Rolls Royce Wraith. One of the smartest things I did in my life was that I didn’t go and buy some exotic car like so many of these guys do when they get a little bit of money. I waited…and waited…and waited some more until I didn’t have to buy one and until it didn’t matter. I just got my financial statement in, the first 3 months of this year compared to last year—a double. Once you make enough money to where you can blow 384K and it doesn’t matter, then go get your Rolls Royce. Until then do not waste your money on watches and cars. You guys that are buying $3,000 suits, stupid. You guys who are buying 200K cars, stupid. You need paper. You need net worth, you need passive income, you need flows. You don’t need a Rolls Royce!

    To Learn more about growing your finances, get your FREE Millionaire Booklet here:

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    --
    Grant Cardone is a New York Times bestselling author, the #1 sales trainer in the world, and an internationally renowned speaker on leadership, real estate investing, entrepreneurship, social media, and finance.  His 5 privately held companies have annual revenues exceeding $100 million. Forbes named Mr Cardone #1 of the 25 Marketing Influencers to Watch in 2017. Grant’s straight-shooting viewpoints on the economy, the middle class, and business have made him a valuable resource for media seeking commentary and insights on real topics that matter. He regularly appears on Fox News, Fox Business, CNBC, and MSNBC, and writes for Forbes, Success Magazine, Business Insider, Entrepreneur.com, and the Huffington Post. He urges his followers and clients to make success their duty, responsibility, and obligation. He currently resides in South Florida with his wife and two daughters.

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    The Conjuring 3 Official Trailer 2017 HD

    2:21

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    Top 10 Things You Should Never Say To Siri

    8:16

    Top 10 Things You Should Never Say To Siri. Siri is famous for helping you search on your phone. However, sometimes you can ask a silly question, and Siri will respond with a crazy answer. So here is the list of the Top 10 Things You Should Never Say To Siri.


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    Freakonomics Radio - Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others?

    36:24

    Freakonomics Radio - Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others?

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others?” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)

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    Why Uber Is an Economist’s Dream

    39:54

    To you, it’s just a ride-sharing app that gets you where you’re going. But to an economist, Uber is a massive repository of moment-by-moment data that is helping answer some of the field’s most elusive questions.

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    Freakonomics Radio 8/10/17 - What Are You Waiting For?

    36:25

    Freakonomics Radio 8/10/17 - What Are You Waiting For? (Rebroadcast)

    Standing in line represents a particularly sloppy — and frustrating — way for supply and demand to meet. Why haven't we found a better way to get what we want? Is it possible that we secretly enjoy waiting in line? And might it even be (gulp) good for us?

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    The Grades Experiment: Freakonomics Movie

    3:01

    At Chicago's Bloom Trail High School, Levitt tests if you can get students to increase their test scores by simply providing them with a financial incentive.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Are Payday Loans Really as Evil as People Say?

    49:41

    Critics -- including President Obama -- say short-term, high-interest loans are predatory,

    trapping borrowers in a cycle of debt. But some economists see them as a useful financial

    instrument for people who need them. As the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau promotes new

    regulation, we ask: who's right?

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    Freakonomics Radio - There’s A War On Sugar. Is It Justified?

    45:58

    Freakonomics Radio - There’s A War On Sugar. Is It Justified?

    Some people argue that sugar should be regulated, like alcohol and tobacco, on the grounds that it’s addictive and toxic. How much sense does that make? We hear from a regulatory advocate, an evidence-based skeptic, a former FDA commissioner — and the organizers of Milktoberfest.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Why Hate the Koch Brothers?

    39:04

    Freakonomics Radio - Why Hate the Koch Brothers? (Part 2)

    Charles Koch, the mega-billionaire CEO of Koch Industries and half of the infamous political machine, sees himself as a classical liberal. So why do most Democrats hate him so much? In a rare series of interviews, he explains his political awakening, his management philosophy and why he supports legislation that goes against his self-interest.

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    Mutual Funds VS Market Index Funds

    9:35

    Learn to budget, beat debt, & build a legacy. Visit the online store today:

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    Welcome to The Dave Ramsey Show like you've never seen it before. The show live streams on YouTube M-F 2-5pm ET! Watch Dave live in studio every day and see behind-the-scenes action from Dave's producers. Watch video profiles of debt-free callers and see them call in live from Ramsey Solutions. During breaks, you'll see exclusive content from people like Rachel Cruze, and Chris Hogan, Christy Wright and Chris Brown —as well as all kinds of other video pieces that we'll unveil every day.

    The Dave Ramsey Show channel will change the way you experience one of the most popular radio shows in the country!

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    Freakonomics Trailer HD Official

    2:32

    FREAKONOMICS is the highly anticipated film version of the phenomenally bestselling book about incentives-based thinking by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. Like the book, the film examines human behavior with provocative and sometimes hilarious case studies, bringing together a dream team of filmmakers responsible for some of the most acclaimed and entertaining documentaries in recent years: Academy Award® winner Alex Gibney (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Casino Jack and the United States of Money), Academy Award® nominees Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing (Jesus Camp), Academy Award® nominee Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me), Eugene Jarecki (Why We Fight) and Seth Gordon (The King of Kong).

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    Freakonomics: What Prostitutes Can Teach About Economics

    5:02

    Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics, recounts a story of talking economics and business practice with a prostitute while researching for SuperFreakonomics.

    Complete video available for free at

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    Freakonomics Radio - The Fracking Boom, a Baby Boom, and the Retreat From Marriage

    44:21

    Freakonomics Radio - The Fracking Boom, a Baby Boom, and the Retreat From Marriage

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    Economist Potty Training: Freakonomics Movie

    2:50

    Levitt's incentive scheme for potty training his daughter Amanda backfires.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Freakonomics 1

    5:46

    A look at everyday experiences in freaky ways based on the bestselling book Freakonomics.

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    Freakonomics Movie Trailer Official

    2:32

    - Follow Us!

    Freakonomics hits theaters on October 1st, 2010.

    FREAKONOMICS is the highly anticipated film version of the phenomenally bestselling book about incentives-based thinking by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. Like the book, the film examines human behavior with provocative and sometimes hilarious case studies, bringing together a dream team of filmmakers responsible for some of the most acclaimed and entertaining documentaries in recent years: Academy Award® winner Alex Gibney (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Casino Jack and the United States of Money), Academy Award® nominees Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing (Jesus Camp), Academy Award® nominee Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me), Eugene Jarecki (Why We Fight) and Seth Gordon (The King of Kong).

    Freakonomics trailer courtesy Magnolia Pictures.

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    Freakonomics Radio 2017 - Food + Science = Victory!

    37:16

    Freakonomics Radio 2017 - Food + Science = Victory! (Rebroadcast)

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Food + Science = Victory! (Rebroadcast).” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)
    A kitchen wizard and a nutrition detective talk about the perfect hamburger, getting the most out of garlic, and why you should use vodka in just about everything.

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    Why Are We Still Using Cash?

    44:48

    It facilitates crime, bribery, and tax evasion – and yet some governments (including ours) are printing more cash than ever. Other countries, meanwhile, are ditching cash entirely. And if Star Trek is right, we won’t have money of any sort in the 24th century.

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    Abortions and Crime: Freakonomics Movie

    4:26

    Levitt takes you through his research on the relationship between dropping crime and the legalization of abortion.

    Clip from the 2010 documentary Freakonomics: The Movie. A dream team of directors explore the hidden side of everything.

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    Why Is Life So Hard? ᴴᴰ ┇ Amazing Reminder ┇ by Ustadh Majed Mahmoud ┇ TDR Production ┇

    2:48

    Support The Dawah - Click Here:

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    Why Is Life So Hard? ᴴᴰ ┇ Amazing Reminder ┇ by Ustadh Majed Mahmoud ┇ TDR Production ┇

    Assalaamu Alaikum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakaathuhu

    *This video is Created by & for The Daily Reminder. Feel free to re-upload and share.

    **No Music was used in the production of this video

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    Why Is Life So Hard? ᴴᴰ - by Ustadh Majed Mahmoud

    Is there any doctor that would make hundreds of thousands of dollars a year without going through any kind of MCAT's , PCAT's, DAT's, chemistry, biology, whatever class, where he or she has to be examined and take the test?

    Can anyone join the basketball team or the soccer team without going through some tests and tryouts?

    Can anyone take their driver's license without taking a driving test?

    And now when Allah (subahaanahu wa ta'ala) says...

    Do you guys think out of your mind that you will be saying, 'I believe!' and you will not be tested?

    Allah is telling you that, you will be left alone saying I believe and no test.

    SubhaanAllah!

    Allah (subahaanahu wa ta'ala) says...

    And you think you will enter paradise just like that?

    And you will not face what the people in the past have faced?

    They faced sicknesses, poverty, calamities and they were shaken...out of test and trials.
    You think you will just say I believe and enter Jannah?

    You think you would just go with life so smoothly and you will go to Jannah where you have a mansion .

    Where you go around and all kind of food is around.

    You will go to Jannah and you will never ever in your life be sad or depressed.

    You will go to Jannah and enjoy every beautiful scene around you.

    You think you will go to Jannah where in that place you will never be sick, you will never sneeze except beauty, you will never have any sweat and if you had sweat...when you have sweat it will be musk and beautiful smell.

    When you go to Jannah your house will be made of bricks of gold and silver...all that in Jannah just like that?!

    And when you go to Jannah and you enjoy the most beautiful thing in the world - the most beautiful thing which you will ever experience, which is seeing Allah (subahaanahu wa ta'ala).

    You seeing Allah (subahaanahu wa ta'ala) is the most beautiful thing in the world.
    You would just get it just like that?

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    Freakonomics Radio - How to Be More Productive

    38:37

    Freakonomics - How to Be More Productive

    It's Self-Improvement Month at Freakonomics Radio. We begin with a topic that seems to be on

    everyone's mind: how to get more done in less time. First, however, a warning: there's a big

    difference between being busy and being productive.

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    Freakonomics Radio 6/14/17 - Evolution, Accelerated

    36:21

    Freakonomics Radio 6/14/17 - Evolution, Accelerated

    A breakthrough in genetic technology has given humans more power than ever to change nature. It could help eliminate hunger and disease; it could also lead to the sort of dystopia we used to only read about in sci-fi novels. So what happens next? Help us meet the Freakonomics Radio listener challenge. If 500 of you become sustaining members at just $7/month before June 30th we'll unlock an additional $25,000 from the Tow Foundation. Become a member now!

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    Freakonomics Radio - The Taboo Trifecta

    33:49

    Freakonomics Radio - The Taboo Trifecta

    Serial entrepreneur Miki Agrawal loves to talk about the bodily functions that make most people flinch. That’s why she’s building a business around the three P’s: periods, pee, and poop.
    Below is a transcript of the episode, modified for your reading pleasure. For more information on the people and ideas in the episode, see the links at the bottom of this post. And you’ll find credits for the music in the episode noted within the transcript.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Earth 2.0: What Would Our Economy Look Like?

    44:09

    Freakonomics Radio - Earth 2.0: What Would Our Economy Look Like?

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Earth 2.0: What Would Our Economy Look Like?” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)

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    The Best of Freakonomics

    1:11:54

    Subscribe for more videos like this:

    The Best of Freakonomics with Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, moderated by Faith Salie.

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    Freakonomics Radio - The Economics of Sleep, Part 2

    43:25

    People who sleep better earn more money. Now all we have to do is teach everyone to sleep

    better.

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    Freakonomics: How Often Do MDs Really Wash Their Hands?

    3:38

    Complete video at:

    SuperFreakonomics authors Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt reveal disturbing statistics on how often hospital doctors actually wash their hands. Levitt discusses how one hospital successfully addressed the issue by growing petri dish cultures from some particularly grimy hands.

    -----

    With Freakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner revealed the good, bad, ugly and super freaky of the world around us.

    The freakquel is here. Back with more than pop-culture trivia, Inforum's next 21st Century Visionary Award recipients are ready to revolutionize our understanding of causality in an incredibly interconnected world. - Commonwealth Club of California

    Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author and journalist who lives in New York City. He is the co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. He is also the author of Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family (1998), Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper (2003), and a children's book, The Boy With Two Belly Buttons (2007).

    Steve Levitt is the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, where he directs the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory.

    Levitt received his BA from Harvard University in 1989 and his PhD from MIT in 1994. He has taught at Chicago since 1997. In 2004, Levitt was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, awarded to the most influential economist under the age of 40. In 2006, he was named one of Time magazine's 100 People Who Shape Our World.

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    Freakonomics Radio - When Helping Hurts

    51:32

    Freakonomics Radio - When Helping Hurts

    Good intentions are nice, but with so many resources poured into social programs, wouldn't it be even nicer to know what actually works?

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    Freakonomics Radio - Is the World Ready for a Guaranted Basic Income?

    37:17

    A lot of full-time jobs in the modern economy simply don't pay a living wage. And even those

    jobs may be obliterated by new technologies. What's to be done so that financially vulnerable

    people aren't just crushed? It may finally be time for an idea that economists have promoted

    for decades.

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    True Crime Garage // Killing Fields Trilogy /// Part 1

    1:53

    True Crime Garage // Killing Fields Trilogy /// Part 1

    Killing Fields Trilogy /// Part 1 of 3 Part 1 of 3 TrueCrimeGarage.com There is a large plot of land about a mile from interstate 45 in south Texas called the Killing Field. This spot along with the stretch of I-45 that runs from Houston to Galveston have claimed many victims and held many secrets. Since 1971 homicides of girls and young women have occurred here at an alarming rate. There have been over thirty murders and several women who have vanished. This story will span three different Texas Counties. Twelve different law enforcement agencies worked these cases. Join us as we take a trip to one of our favorite states to discuss one of America's most notorious serial cases. Beer of the Week - Meta Modern Session IPA by Oasis brewing company Garage Grade

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    Has the U.S. Presidency Become a Dictatorship?

    48:01

    Sure, we all pay lip service to the Madisonian system of checks and balances. But as one legal scholar argues, presidents have been running roughshod over the system for decades. The result? An accumulation of power that’s turned the presidency into a position the Founders wouldn’t have recognized.

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    Freakonomics Radio - Earth 2.0: Is Income Inequality Inevitable?

    42:39

    Freakonomics Radio - Earth 2.0: Is Income Inequality Inevitable?

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Earth 2.0: Is Income Inequality Inevitable?” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.)
    In pursuit of a more perfect economy, we discuss the future of work; the toxic remnants of colonization; and whether giving everyone a basic income would be genius — or maybe the worst idea ever.
    Below is a transcript of the episode, modified for your reading pleasure. For more information on the people and ideas in the episode, see the links at the bottom of this post. And you’ll find credits for the music in the episode noted within the transcript.

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    ETFs vs index funds | IG

    3:16

    Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are index funds that are traded on a regulated exchange like a share. The main difference lies in how the instruments can be purchased or sold.

    ETFs, like investment funds, provide exposure to a portfolio of financial instruments, but they’re traded just like shares on a stock exchange.

    Some of the benefits of trading ETFs include:

    • Cost-efficiency
    • Gaining access to hard-to-reach markets
    • Increased transparency and flexibility

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    IG is a global leader in retail forex, providing fast and flexible access to over 10,000 financial markets – including indices, shares, forex, commodities and digital 100 binaries. Established in 1974 as the world’s first financial spread betting firm, we are now the world’s No.1 provider of CFDs (Contract for Difference) and a global leader in forex. We also offer an execution-only share dealing service. All trading involves risk. Please take care to manage your exposure.

    The comments in this video do not constitute investment advice and IG accepts no responsibility for any use that may be made of them.

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    That Thing You Do! HD

    2:42

    That Thing You Do! movie clips:
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    CLIP DESCRIPTION:
    When their song hits the airwaves, the band members converge to celebrate wildly.

    FILM DESCRIPTION:
    Tom Hanks made his directorial debut in this bright comedy set in the mid-1960's about a rock group and their brief fling with fame. Guy Patterson (Tom Everett Scott) works as a salesman at his father's appliance store and plays the drums in his spare time, fancying himself a jazz musician. One day, a buddy of Guy's tells him a local rock band, The One-Ders (it's pronounced wonders), are in need of a drummer -- they have Battle of the Bands coming up and their usual timekeeper has broken his arm. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it's time to play their best original, a love ballad called That Thing You Do, Guy lays in a sharp, driving beat that turns the tune into an uptempo pop-rocker. Lead singer Jimmy (Johnathon Schaech) isn't happy at first, but guitarist Lenny (Steve Zahn) and the nameless Bass Player (Ethan Embry) think the song sounds better that way -- and they notice the girls like it just fine. Soon people are actually requesting the song at their shows, and the One-Ders scrape together some money to press a single of That Thing You Do to sell between sets. A DJ puts the song on the radio, and opportunity knocks in the form of Mr. White (Tom Hanks), who works for the very major Play-Tone Records label. Play-Tone buys the rights to That Thing You Do and puts the band on the road as their song makes it way to the top of the national charts. But what can The Wonders (as Play-Tone have re-named them) do for an encore? And what should Guy do about his infatuation with Jimmy's girlfriend, Faye (Liv Tyler)? Real-life 60's obsessed rocker Chris Isaak has a small part as a recording engineer, and fans of real 60's garage bands will appreciate the wealth of small, accurately observed details (for example, halfway through the film, when a few That Thing You Do royalty checks have presumably kicked in, the band's inexpensive Danelectro guitars disappear and the Wonders are suddenly playing on brand new Fender gear -- the height of rock style in 1965).

    CREDITS:
    TM & © Fox (1996)
    Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
    Cast: Ethan Embry, Holmes Osborne, Johnathon Schaech, Tom Everett Scott, Steve Zahn, Liv Tyler
    Director: Tom Hanks
    Producers: Jonathan Demme, Gary Goetzman, Terry Odem, Edward Saxon
    Screenwriter: Tom Hanks

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    Freakonomics Radio - BONUS: Tell Me Something I Dont Know on the topic of Rivalry

    1:1:41

    Freakonomics Radio - BONUS: Tell Me Something I Don't Know on the topic of Rivalry

    Steve Levitt, Scott Turow and Bridget Gainer are panelists. For the Freakonomics co-author, the attorney and novelist, and the Cook County commissioner it's game on! as they tackle competition of all kinds: athletic, sexual, geopolitical, and the little-known battle between butter and margarine that landed in the Supreme Court. WBEZ's Tricia Bobeda, co-host of the Nerdette podcast, is fact-checker.

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    Fresh Air 7/12/17 - Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon On The Big Sick

    47:54

    Fresh Air 7/12/17 - Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon On 'The Big Sick'

    Comic Kumail Nanjiani remembers the first time he thought of marrying then-girlfriend Emily V. Gordon: when he saw her in a coma. Now the couple has co-written a romantic comedy based on their story called 'The Big Sick.'

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    Freakonomics - a TED Talk

    8:48

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    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: The Loneliness of the Goalkeeper

    20:44

    Radiolab - Radiolab Presents: The Loneliness of the Goalkeeper
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    This week on the podcast, football! No, it's not a Super Bowl recap. Jad and Robert present a piece from across the pond--a piece about soccer they fell in love with when they heard it at the Third Coast festival in Chicago.
    Back in October, Jad and Robert hosted the awards ceremony at the Third Coast International Audio Festival. And one piece, well...kinda blew their minds. Partly because it's beautiful (it won one of the big awards), and partly because it has a lot to say about symmetry--a topic we'll spend a full hour on in an upcoming episode. (By the way: Jad and Robert will be performing the symmetry show live in New York, Los Angeles, and Seattle in March, get more info and tickets here!)

    So, consider this an appetizer for the symmetry shmorgishborg to come. The Loneliness of the Goalkeeper, presented by writer, broadcaster, and former goalkeeper Hardeep Singh Kohli, and produced by Adam Fowler, is a Ladbroke Radio production, and was originally broadcast on BBC Radio 4. Enjoy!
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    Planet Money Podcast - 06.09.17

    21:50

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    Freakonomics Radio - Hoopers! Hoopers! Hoopers!

    39:24

    Freakonomics Radio - Hoopers! Hoopers! Hoopers!

    Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Hoopers! Hoopers! Hoopers!” (You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts or elsewhere, get the RSS feed or listen via the media player above.)
    As CEO of Microsoft, Steve Ballmer was famous for over-the-top enthusiasm. Now he’s brought that same passion to the N.B.A. — and to a pet project called USAFacts, which performs a sort of fiscal colonoscopy on the American government.

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    Eating Hot Dogs Like a Freak, with Stephen Dubner

    7:15

    Author and journalist Stephen Dubner explains what we can learn from record-breaking hot dog eater Takeru Kobayashi. Dubner is the co-author of Think Like a Freak (

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    Transcript - Whenever somebody does something so much better than everybody else whether it's a competitive thing or otherwise, it's natural to ask well what do they do that's so different? So we tell the story of Takeru Kobayashi who you may recognize his name as the best, maybe slightly disputed now but a great hot dog eating champion. When he competed in his first Nathan's Famous Fourth of July Coney Island hot dog eating championship, the world record was 25 and one-eighth hot dogs and buns in 12 minutes.

    And his first competition -- and guys have been competing for many -- 40 years or so. So, you know, it wasn't an overnight thing. And his first contest eating hot dogs he didn't just win and he didn't just set a new world record but he doubled the old record -- 50 hot dogs and buns in 12 minutes. So naturally you would ask how could he be so, so, so much better? Was he an anatomical freak or was there something in his methodology and his approach and in his strategy and so on. That's what we set out to find out. We spent a lot of time talking to him about his approach. And it turns out what he did was he looked at the way all the past competitors were doing it which is basically you have a pile of hot dogs and you pick one up two hands, eat it and then fast as you can, dah, dah, dah, slub down some water, swallow and then keep going as fast as you can.

    He looked at it and he thought is that really the right way to solve that problem or to attack that challenge. And he thought maybe but not necessarily. And so he decided to kind of break it down and try to experiment from top to bottom and in Think Like a Freak we write a lot about the need for experimentation. Experimentation can give great feedback, great answers. A lot of people are scared of experimentation because they think you have to be scientists or they're also scared of it because it means that you have to admit that you don't know the answer. A lot of people like to assume they know the solution to a problem when they don't. But experimentation can really, you know, set you up to learn the real answer. So he tried a lot of different things. Not all of them worked, many didn't. He found that if he broke the dog in two pieces before he ate that would help just a little bit at the start because he's first of all doing one move with his hands that he doesn't need his mouth for so he's starting to speed up there.

    Then he found that he liked to separate the dog from the bun. He found that he could eat each faster that way. The dog actually goes down fairly easy because it's dense and salty and slick. The bun is actually airy and kind of hard. That's why they were hard to chew together. So then he found that if he soaked the bun in warm water before eating then squeezed out the excess water then he could make a kind of bun ball, pop that in, that goes down. Now you might think, well wait a minute. Why would you want to take on excess water when you're trying to eat as many hot dogs as you can. It turns out however that there was a benefit to this idea which in addition to making it faster which was that he was now getting liquid down his system without having to stop after eating each hot dog and drink. So he's constantly making his process more efficient. He's videotaping his training sessions. He's recording all this data and analyzing it in a spreadsheet. He's experimenting with pace. He's experimenting with sleep. He's experimenting with weight training.

    And when it came time to compete for the first time he blows everybody's mind and doubles the world record. So you could say well this is just a nice albeit silly, albeit disgusting story about some guy who did something better than everybody else. And that's fair enough. But we make a couple of conclusions from it. The first is that what he really did that I think can be applied to any kind of problem is he redefined the problem he was trying to solve. So all the other eaters were basically asking themselves this question. How can I eat a lot of hot dogs in 12 minutes, right. That's kind of the natural conventional question. He asked a very different question -- maybe not very different -- subtly different question that led to an entirely different result which was how can I eat one hot dog faster. And by asking a different question he came up with an entirely different set of answers.

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    Fresh Air - Why Buddhism Is True - 8/8/17

    49:32

    Fresh Air - 'Why Buddhism Is True' - 8/8/17

    Science journalist and author Robert Wright says that Buddhist meditation might help counteract our natural tendency towards unhappiness and dissatisfaction. His new book is 'Why Buddhism is True.' Also John Powers reviews the new Criterion release of Albert Brooks' 1985 film 'Lost in America.'

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