Feynman


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    How to Learn Faster with the Feynman Technique

    5:48

    If you want to cut your study time, using the Feynman Technique is a great way to do it. Named after the physicist Richard Feynman, it revolves around explaining a concept in simple language as if you were teaching it to someone else.

    In this video, I'll show you exactly how to use the Feynman Technique.

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    Richard Feynman. Why.

    7:33

    Richard Feynman. Why.

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    How to Use the Feynman Technique - Study Tips - How to Study

    5:45

    Hello Socratica Friends! We're here to help you be a Great Student. One of the greatest students of all time was also one of the greatest teachers of all time - Richard Feynman. He was a Nobel-winning physicist, who was legendary for being able to reach even complete novices with his clear, jargon-free explanations. Feynman knew a lot about how to help students learn, because he himself was insatiably curious, and never stopped learning.

    The Feynman Technique is named after this extraordinary thinker. It’s a way to test yourself as you study - do you REALLY understand something? Or are you just repeating what you read in a textbook or heard in class? This is one of the most important study tips to learn about being a great student, whether you are in high school, college, grad school, or you are learning on your own.

    After you watch the video, try our Feynman Technique Challenge - pick something complicated you are studying, and try to explain it to us in the comments. USE THE FEYNMAN TECHNIQUE! Are you a great explainer?

    WATCH NEXT:

    How to Study for a TEST


    How to take NOTES


    POMODORO Technique


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    We recommend:

    Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! Hilarious and touching stories from Feynman himself.


    The Feynman Lectures on Physics (Feynman’s lectures from Caltech)


    The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin (Chess Prodigy)


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    Great Student: Liliana De Castro
    Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison

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    10 Times Richard Feynman Blew Our Minds

    15:18

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    Part 1 in our tribute to one of the greatest minds of all time Richard Feynman. It's an honor to make this video and bring more attention to Feynman's awesome ideas. Thank you all for the nice comments and support.

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    Richard Feynman - The World from another point of view

    36:42

    The famous American physicist Richard Feynman used to take holidays in England. His third wife, Gweneth Howarth, was a native of West Yorkshire, so every year the Feynman family would visit her hometown of Ripponden or the nearby hamlet of Mill Bank.

    In 1973 Yorkshire public television made a short film of the Nobel laureate while he was there. The resulting film, Take the World From Another Point of View, was broadcast in America as part of the PBS Nova series. The documentary features a fascinating interview, but what sets it apart from other films on Feynman is the inclusion of a lively conversation he had with the eminent British astrophysicist Fred Hoyle.

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    The Feynman Technique

    2:02

    Support our channel with a small donation at

    Richard Feynman was a physicist who received a nobel prize for his work in quantum electrodynamics. He was notorious for asking his mathematicians to explain concepts in simple language to test their understanding.

    Here his unique technique to learn new materials:

    Step 1. Choose a topic you want to understand and start studying it. Once you know what it is about, take a piece of paper and write the topic at the top of the page.

    Step 2. Pretend you’re teaching the idea to someone else. Write out an explanation on the paper while you describe them out loud. Like this you get an idea of what you understand and where you still have gaps. Whenever you get stuck, go back and study. Repeat that process until you can explain it.

    Step 3. Finally do it again, but now simplify your language or use an analogy to make the point. If your explanation ends up wordy and confusing, that’s an indication that you do not understand the idea well enough. If that happens go back until you have mastered it.

    It is the process of thinking about an idea while teaching it that make the method so effective. Once you can explain an idea with simple language and create graphic analogies, you have deeply understood it and will remember it for a long time.

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    Richard Feynman, The Great Explainer: Great Minds

    10:24

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    Aside from being a great scientist and teacher, Richard Feynman was a kooky and curious guy who played the bongos, painted, and did math in strip clubs. Hank shares his Feynman love fest with us in this episode of SciShow: Great Minds.

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    Richard Feynman on Electron 2 Slit Experiment

    53:51

    Description

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    Richard Feynman talks about light

    5:55

    Inconceivable nature of nature.

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    Dr. Sheldon Cooper on Richard Feynmans vacations

    51

    Dr. Cooper is being oblicated to take vacations. Now he's trying a the same solution used by the great physicist of Quantum Electrodynamics.

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    Feynman Diagrams - Sixty Symbols

    9:01

    Feynman Diagrams help physicists understand what happens when particles collide. More videos at

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    Great Minds: Richard Feynman - The Uncertainty Of Knowledge

    2:51

    ... Great Minds, Great Words: Richard Feynman - The Uncertainty of Knowledge ... The Nature and Purpose of the Universe.

    Playlist Great Minds, Great Words:


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    Richard Feynman (1918-1988) was an American physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics (he proposed the parton model).

    For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. He developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams. During his lifetime, Feynman became one of the best-known scientists in the world.

    He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb and was a member of the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the field of quantum computing, and introducing the concept of nanotechnology (creation of devices at the molecular scale). He held the Richard Chace Tolman professorship in theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology.

    Feynman was a keen popularizer of physics through both books and lectures, notably a 1959 talk on top-down nanotechnology called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom and The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Feynman also became known through his semi-autobiographical books (Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think?) and books written about him, such as Tuva or Bust!

    He was regarded as an eccentric and free spirit. He was a prankster, juggler, safecracker, proud amateur painter, and bongo player. He liked to pursue a variety of seemingly unrelated interests, such as art, percussion, Maya hieroglyphs, and lock picking.

    Feynman also had a deep interest in biology, and was a friend of the geneticist and microbiologist Esther Lederberg, who developed replica plating and discovered bacteriophage lambda. They had several mutual physicist friends who, after beginning their careers in nuclear research, moved for moral reasons into genetics, among them Leó Szilárd, Guido Pontecorvo, and Aaron Novick.


    .

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    20 Times Richard Dawkins Blew Our Minds - Must Watch!!!

    36:17

    20 Times Richard Dawkins Blew Our Minds - Must Watch!!!
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    Clinton Richard Dawkins FRS FRSL (born 26 March 1941) is an English ethologist, evolutionary biologist and author. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and was the University of Oxford's Professor for Public Understanding of Science from 1995 until 2008.
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    Learn Faster with The Feynman Technique

    4:08

    If you're having trouble seeing the examples, you can also download them here:


    The technique is inspired by Richard Feynman and the story I share at the beginning which is taken from his autobiography, Surely You Must Be Joking, Mr. Feynman.

    If you liked this video, subscribe to my newsletter and you can get a free ebook describing the rapid-learning ideas I discuss in this video:

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    Leonard Susskind: My friend Richard Feynman

    14:42

    What's it like to be pals with a genius? Onstage at TEDxCaltech, physicist Leonard Susskind spins a few stories about his friendship with the legendary Richard Feynman, discussing his unconventional approach to problems both serious and ... less so.

    TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the Sixth Sense wearable tech, and Lost producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at

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    7 Times Neil deGrasse Tyson Went Unhinged Beast Mode

    14:24

    Subscribe now to ScienceNET!

    Seven more informative and inspirational moments with our favorite astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. Thank you for all the support and nice comments/ debates (and feedback on the titles) - we're at 200k subscribers now!

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    Safe Cracking with Feynman - Numberphile

    8:23

    A chat about some of the ways legendary physicist Richard Feynman cracked safes (filing cabinets) at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project.
    More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

    Discussed by Professor Roger Bowley.

    My Favourite Scientist on Feynman:
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    Richard Feynman’s Best Arguments Of All Time

    48:00

    Here’s a great compilation of Richard Feynman‘s best arguments
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    Best of Richard Feynman debates, lectures, Arguments, and interviews #1| Mind blowing documentary

    27:37

    #Best of #Richard #Feynman #Debate, #Interview, #lectures and #Arguments #1 | #Mind #blowing #documentary
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    About Richard Feynman:
    Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965.

    Feynman developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams. During his lifetime, Feynman became one of the best-known scientists in the world. In a 1999 poll of 130 leading physicists worldwide by the British journal Physics World he was ranked as one of the ten greatest physicists of all time.[1]

    He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb during World War II and became known to a wide public in the 1980s as a member of the Rogers Commission, the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the field of quantum computing, and introducing the concept of nanotechnology. He held the Richard C. Tolman professorship in theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology.

    Feynman was a keen popularizer of physics through both books and lectures, including a 1959 talk on top-down nanotechnology called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, and the three-volume publication of his undergraduate lectures, The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Feynman also became known through his semi-autobiographical books Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think? and books written about him, such as Tuva or Bust! and Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman by James Gleick.

    More :

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    Doubt ~Richard Feynman

    2:40

    I hope you enjoy this video, I remastered it, and improved the quality of video and sounds dramatically. Richard Feynman has been a lasting influence on my life, and I believe he has also been a influence on many more, I hope this video, if nothing more, acts as a representation of my appreciation of what this man has done for my life. Richard, you will always be one of the best people who have ever graced the planet with your brief existence.

    You can find the original here (which is ironically v2):



    Edited, produced and uploaded by ScientificUnity. All audio/video belong to their respective owners.

    Music:

    Theme 3 (End Credits) - John Murphy

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    TEDxCaltech - Leonard Susskind - Richard Feynman

    15:42

    Leonard Susskind is the Felix Bloch Professor of Physics at Stanford University.  His research interests include string theory, quantum field theory, quantum statistical mechanics, and quantum cosmology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and, since 2009, has been serving as Director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics.

    About TEDx, x = independently organized event: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

    On January 14, 2011, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech, an exciting one-day event to honor Richard Feynman, Nobel Laureate, Caltech physics professor, iconoclast, visionary, and all-around curious character. Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.

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    TEDxCaltech - Michelle Feynman and Christopher Sykes - Fun to Imagine

    13:11

    Michelle Feynman is the daughter of Richard Feynman. A graduate of Art Center College of Design, Michelle is a freelance photographer and spends most of her days taking pictures. She is perhaps best known as the editor of, Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track: The Letters of Richard P. Feynman, a collection of letters to and from her father.The book includes an introduction by Michelle in which she describes what it was like to grow up as the daughter of one of the world's best-known physicists. Michelle has also gathered a compilation of her father's artwork in a book entitled, The Art of Richard P. Feynman: Images by a Curious Character.

    Christopher Sykes is a TV documentary producer based in London.  He was born in 1945, and was educated at the Atlantic College and Merton College, Oxford where he read English.  In 1970 he joined the BBC as a television researcher.He has made about seventy documentaries for BBC TV and Channel 4, some of which have been shown on PBS/Nova -- notably the programs he made with and about Richard Feynman (The Pleasure of Finding Things Out, Last Journey of a Genius and The Best Mind Since Einstein). He is also a consultant to Web Stories, an online video collection of in-depth interviews with many of the great minds of our time.

    About TEDx, x = independently organized event: In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

    On January 14, 2011, Caltech hosted TEDxCaltech, an exciting one-day event to honor Richard Feynman, Nobel Laureate, Caltech physics professor, iconoclast, visionary, and all-around curious character. Visit TEDxCaltech.com for more details.

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    challenger disaster

    4:15

    space shuttle challenger disaster in 1986

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    Feynman: Magnets FUN TO IMAGINE 4

    7:33

    New! See also Feynman MAGNETS EXTRA on YouTube

    Water, fire, air and dirt/
    Fucking magnets, how do they work?/
    And I don't wanna talk to a scientist/
    Y'all motherfuckers lying, and getting me pissed

    - Insane Clown Posse, Miracles (2009)

    Here, physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman explains to a non-scientist just how difficult it is to answer certain questions in lay terms! A classic example of Feynman's clarity of thought, powers of explanation and intellectual honesty - and his refusal to 'cheat' with misleading analogies... From the BBC TV series 'Fun to Imagine'(1983). You can now watch higher quality versions of these episodes at bbc.co.uk/archive/feynman/

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    Feynman: Electricity FUN TO IMAGINE 5

    9:34

    Physicist Richard Feynman visits the dentist and wonders about the amazing phenomenon of electricity... From the BBC TV series 'Fun to Imagine'(1983). You can now watch higher quality versions of some of these episodes at bbc.co.uk/archive/feynman/

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    THE FEYNMAN SERIES - Beauty

    5:11

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    Feynmans Infinite Quantum Paths | Space Time

    15:49

    How to predict the path of a quantum particle. Part 3 in our Quantum Field Theory Series.

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    There is a fundamental limit to the knowability of the universe. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle tells us that the more precisely we try to define one property, the less definable is its counterpart. Knowing a particle’s location perfectly means its velocity is unknowable. But unmeasured properties are not just uncertain; they are undefined. Quantum mechanics seems to imply that ALL possible properties, paths, or events that could reasonably occur between measurements DO occur. Whether or not this is true, a mathematical description of this crazy idea led to the most powerful expression of quantum mechanics ever devised: Richard Feynman’s path integral formulation.

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    Some Americans are ignorant and proud of it! What continent is Europe in?

    9:42

    Simon Sinek on Millennial and Internet Addiction:
    Questions:
    1. What country is the Panama Canal in?
    2. Who takes over if the President and the Vice President die?
    3. There are ten birds in a tree. A hunter shoots one. How many are left in the tree?
    4. Who's our Vice President?
    5. Which is the largest state in the US?
    6. If YES spells yes, what does EYES spell?
    7. What continent is Europe in?
    8. How many sides are on a hexagon?
    9. Who is the President of Africa?
    10. What is the population of the US. Take a guess.

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    Feynman: Take the world from another point of view

    9:01

    Richard Feynman
    Take the world from another point of view
    Part 1/4

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    CNN, Feynman and the Challenger disaster

    11:50

    June 1986 Interview of Richard Feynman on the Challenger Disaster (Footage taken from ) The interview begins at 2:30.

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    You dont like it? Go somewhere else! by Richard Feynman, the QED Lecture at University of Auckland

    1:15

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    Richard Feynman - Patents

    6:55

    Richard Feynman talks about some of his unusual patents and how they came into being through some of his own ideas for possible.nuclear powered vehicles, which he brainstormed during his time working on the atomic bomb in The Manhattan Project.
    Feynman himself had no idea they would patent these ideas and only found out about it when he was offered a job of being the head of a research team to develop a nuclear powered aircraft. Feynman did not accept this job, as he was a theoretical physicist and aircraft engineering was of no interest to him.

    For legal reasons, a dollar was to be exchanged for the patent papers. Since Feynman received no dollar, he went to the patent office to get his dollar and used it to buy sweets as a joke to the bureaucratic and anal nature of patent law and the goons who enforce it.

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    Richard Feynman - Problem Solving

    14:24

    Richard Feynman was one of the greatest problem solvers of the 20th century and loved being puzzled and solving puzzles, a quality that made him a legendary physicist. To be good at science is to be good at being puzzled and seeing puzzles in everyday phenomena that are taken for granted, allowing you to see what is right in front of you in a new and exciting point of view. This allows for huge developments and innovations that are completely different from anything before.

    One of the 3 winners of the 1965 Nobel prize in Physics for his work, Feynman is was an expert on quantum mechanics and developed the Path Integral formulation of Relativistic Quantum mechanics, used in Quantum Field Theory, interpreted the Born series of scattering amplitudes as vertices and Green's function propagators in his famous diagrams, the Feynman Diagrams, and also worked on the fundamental excitations in Liquid Helium leading to a correct model describing superfluidity using phonons, maxons and rotons to describe the various excitation curves.

    During the Manhatten Project, Richard Feynman performed theoretical calculations on the first nuclear weapons developed during the Manhatten project with his supervisor Hans Bethe. They extended Serber's original formula for the yield of a nuclear weapon and developed the Bethe-Feynman formula, which is still classified by the US government even today.

    Other fields of work include the Wheeler-Feynman Absorber Theory for Electromagnetic Radiation, developed with his colleague John A. Wheeler, which was the first attempt to create a theory of electromagnetism that obeys time-reversal theory.

    He also developed the Feynman-Hellmann Theorem, which can be formulated from his own Path Intregral interpretation and relate the derivative of the total energy of any system to the expectation value of the derivative of the Hamiltonian with respect to a single parameter, e.g volume.

    This theory makes possible the calculation of the intramolecular forces of individual molecule in terms of the electronic density (ρ(r)) and the atomic coordinates and nuclear charges of the individual atoms. This, simulated on computers, allows dynamical molecular and quantum systems to be simulated on powerful computers. Such technology is only beginning to have applications in the fields of simulating how proteins fold, how to design drugs that act specifically on biochemical processes and how to simulate quantum logic and computation, something Feynman had predicted long before before the first atomic traps were invented.

    Feynman was also a huge visionary in the fields of nanotechnology and small scale manufacturing, something which has led to the modern age and continues to accelerate to new developments in human civilization today.

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    Richard Feynman explains the feeling of confusion

    44

    Feeling of confusion

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    BBC ON PARTITION

    13:56

    bbc on india

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    dhw

    1:54

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    7 Times Warren Buffett Nailed Everything

    10:20

    Subscribe now to ScienceNET!

    Warren Buffett is widely regarded as the greatest stock market investor of all time. Learn from his wisdom in life and money in these seven informative moments.

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    Lawrence Krauss - The Biography of Richard Feynman Part 1

    43:04

    Lawrence Krauss - The Biography of Richard Feynman Part 1

    Lawrence Krauss talks about the rich life of Richard Feyman and also makes quantum mechanics much less harder to understand

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    Date: 2011

    Lawrence Maxwell Krauss (born 27 May 1954) is an American theoretical physicist and cosmologist who is Foundation Professor of the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, and director of its Origins Project.
    He is known as an advocate of the public understanding of science, of public policy based on sound empirical data, of scientific skepticism and of science education, and works to reduce the influence of what he opines as superstition and religious dogma in popular culture.
    Krauss is the author of several bestselling books, including The Physics of Star Trek (1995) and A Universe from Nothing (2012), and chairs the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors.
    Krauss has argued that public policy debates in the United States should have a greater focus on science, and that the public have a right to scrutinize the religious beliefs of Presidential candidates in the ways that they relate to public policy.
    Krauss describes himself as an antitheist and takes part in public debates on religion. Krauss is featured in the 2013 documentary The Unbelievers, in which he and Richard Dawkins travel across the globe speaking publicly about the importance of science and reason as opposed to religion and superstition. He has participated in many debates with religious apologists, including William Lane Craig.
    In his book, A Universe from Nothing: Why There is Something Rather than Nothing (2012), Krauss discusses the premise that something cannot come from nothing, which has often been used as an argument for the existence of a Prime mover. He has since argued in a debate with John Ellis and Don Cupitt that the laws of physics allow for the universe to be created from nothing. What would be the characteristics of a universe that was created from nothing, just with the laws of physics and without any supernatural shenanigans? The characteristics of the universe would be precisely those of the ones we live in. In an interview with The Atlantic, however, he states that he has never claimed that questions about origins are over. According to Krauss, I don't ever claim to resolve that infinite regress of why-why-why-why-why; as far as I'm concerned it's turtles all the way down.

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    Surely Youre Joking, Mr. Feynman! | Bring Up Genius | Animated Book Reviews

    5:23

    This is an animated book review of: Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!: Adventures of a Curious Character .

    The Book: “Surely, you are joking Mr. Feynman?” is well-written, and easy-to-read. It is a conversation between Feynman and one of his friends. They not only give a deep picture about the upbringing, and the personality of Mr. Feynman, but also give an authentic description of scientific creativity and the process of discovery.

    In this video I will present you the four main ideas of the book and the criticism of it.
    Idea Number 1. Passion for Learning New Things
    You should have your passions - but you should also have your hobbies. Feynman was of course passionate about Physics, but he was curious about everything he saw:
    He joined a Brazilian Bongo group and took part on the annual competition at a street parade in Rio de Janeiro.
    • He cracked safes in Los Alamos for fun during the Manhattan project
    • He spent one of his summer holidays working under James Watson, the discoverer of the DNA
    • He started drawing without any knowledge or experience, and became a hot commodity on the art market

    This is also the basic principle of the school founded by Elon Musk, founder of Paypal and Tesla Motors. So if you are focusing strictly on one area in your life, you need a new hobby. Just look around and ask yourself how this or that works. And go and find out! Feynman was simply looking at a man playing around with a plate in a restaurant and later this experience helped him to understand how electrons work.

    Idea Number 2. Failures of Education
    Feynman spent years in Brazilian and had a chance to observe the Brazilian educational system. He concluded that many students were simply memorizing the curriculum, but had no understanding of the concepts they applied to.
    Feynman’s approach was rooted in his upbringing what I already presented in my earlier video, making the topic exciting.
    I am also very thankful to my parents that they brought up me, that I should challenge even the teachers in schools. And I recommend you the same, if your child’s teacher only inspire him to pass tests instead of teaching how to make sense of the world around them. In many cases the reason for this is, that the teacher is simply a bad pedagogue or he does not understand the subject himself.
    And it is not unique for Brazilian, Feynman found the same chaos in California school system when he was asked to choose the text books from which students will learn. Most of the books were abounded with factual errors.
    And some of the participants who were responsible for evaluating the books, not even read these, but valued the books randomly. And at the end the choice was made by low financial budget instead of the quality of the book.

    This will lead us to Idea Number 3. Always question anything
    When you were a kid, you also had a lot of faith in all sorts of things. Maybe you also thought that if an ‘expert’ said something, it must be true; if it was in television or in the newspapers, it must be true. But after meeting people in the ‘real world’ that illusion imploded: as the above mentioned example about the school system demonstrates, in many cases the world is run by people underqualified and overconfident.
    How is it connected to the upbringing of your child? Feynman’s father was a uniform maker, so he often dealt with clients of all types of notoriety and he knew that underneath all those uniforms were just another naked ape.
    So thanks to his pedagogical principle, Richard had no time for formalisms, rituals or societal views. He never took any data for granted and always questioned the sources even if these were published in prestigious scientific journals.
    So for example if you believe that all geniuses have high IQ, and you don’t have a chance to bring up a genius child, I would like to ask you to question this belief as I did in my earlier video “Thy Myth of IQ”.
    Idea Number 4 Simplify
    What made Feynman a genius? For me, one of the major reasons is that he was capable of explaining the most complex of matters to a five-year-old. I feel how hard it is. I now have a 3 years old son and he already can ask wonderful questions. And in some cases I also don’t know the right answer to these basic questions, but I try to explain it to him that he is able to understand it. This is the same principle I described in my book review about Karl Witte.

    Subscribe to the video course at:
    - Uncovers the secrets of the biggest Geniuses like the Polgár sisters, Keith Richards, Richard Feynman, etc
    - Guide you through the process of bringing up genius with the potential to change the life of your children.
    - Gives you a help to build up your own Genius Life Plan
    - Become a member of a community of other people who Bring Up Genius

    Subscribe to Bring Up Genius YouTube Channel at:


    Bring Up Genius

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    unfinished

    3:29

    xzibit - paparazzi (instrumental)

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    Surely Youre Joking, Mr. Feynman! Book Review

    4:13

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    Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!:

    Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Book Review

    Have you ever heard about this book?

    This book was recommended to me and I must say that this is not the type of book I usually read. However, I decided to take it a shot. And I must say I really liked it.

    Here is the book description, extracted from Amazon
    A New York Times bestseller―the outrageous exploits of one of this century's greatest scientific minds and a legendary American original.

    Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. Here he recounts in his inimitable voice his experience trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek; cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets; accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums; painting a naked female toreador. In short, here is Feynman's life in all its eccentric―a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.

    Wanna know more about this book? Watch this video and find out!

    If you have a question, email me at john@simpleprogrammer.com

    If you liked this video, share, like and, of course, subscribe!

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    The Fantastic Mr Feynman

    2:09

    Richard Feynman is one of the most iconic, influential and inspiring scientists of the 20th century. He helped design the atomic bomb, solved the mystery of the Challenger Shuttle catastrophe and won a Nobel Prize. Now, 25 years after his death - in his own words and those of his friends and family - this is the story of the most captivating communicator in the history of science.

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    Why Cant Dogs Eat Chocolate?

    3:22

    It’s hard to say 'no' to puppy eyes, so here’s some information you can share with your pets next time you unwrap that chocolate bar

    Hosted by: Olivia Gordon
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  • desc

    Mark Crossfield has Embarrased himself in the Sky/BBC so called debate

    9:51

    Range Pro you tuber Mark Crossfield had come to the sudden realisation that he has a little support in his vendetta against Sky .

  • desc

    When The Sahara Desert Was Green - Science Documentary 2017

    45:23

  • desc

    More BBC SJW nonsense brainwashing children

    4:06

    (16TH AUG 2017) Subscribe for more rightwing News.

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    The Greatest SECRET That Will Change Your Life

    32:01

    (I love this audio) This Speech was from 1956 by Earl Nightingale and still true to this date! I was given this Audio Cassette tape and a simple player by a very Successful man when I first learned about the law of attraction. He told me it made him so successful. I started listening to this tape, and my life begin to change. I listen to it everyday, sometime twice a day. Fill this wisdom and knowledge in your mind and let it guide you to success.

    If you wish to watch Part 2, click here:

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    Join our NEW social platforms below
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    Please watch: You'll never think the same after watching this - Being Great (Vol 4)

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    Quantum Theory - Full Documentary HD

    54:54

    Like us on Facebook:
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    The World of Quantum - Full Documentary HD 2014
    For more Scientific DOCUMENTARIES.
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    Quantum mechanics (QM -- also known as quantum physics, or quantum theory) is a branch of physics which deals with physical phenomena at nanoscopic scales where the action is on the order of the Planck constant. It departs from classical mechanics primarily at the quantum realm of atomic and subatomic length scales. Quantum mechanics provides a mathematical description of much of the dual particle-like and wave-like behavior and interactions of energy and matter. Quantum mechanics provides a substantially useful framework for many features of the modern periodic table of elements including the behavior of atoms during chemical bonding and has played a significant role in the development of many modern technologies.

    In advanced topics of quantum mechanics, some of these behaviors are macroscopic (see macroscopic quantum phenomena) and emerge at only extreme (i.e., very low or very high) energies or temperatures (such as in the use of superconducting magnets). For example, the angular momentum of an electron bound to an atom or molecule is quantized. In contrast, the angular momentum of an unbound electron is not quantized. In the context of quantum mechanics, the wave--particle duality of energy and matter and the uncertainty principle provide a unified view of the behavior of photons, electrons, and other atomic-scale objects.

    The mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics are abstract. A mathematical function, the wavefunction, provides information about the probability amplitude of position, momentum, and other physical properties of a particle. Mathematical manipulations of the wavefunction usually involve bra--ket notation which requires an understanding of complex numbers and linear functionals. The wavefunction formulation treats the particle as a quantum harmonic oscillator, and the mathematics is akin to that describing acoustic resonance. Many of the results of quantum mechanics are not easily visualized in terms of classical mechanics. For instance, in a quantum mechanical model the lowest energy state of a system, the ground state, is non-zero as opposed to a more traditional ground state with zero kinetic energy (all particles at rest). Instead of a traditional static, unchanging zero energy state, quantum mechanics allows for far more dynamic, chaotic possibilities, according to John Wheeler.

    The earliest versions of quantum mechanics were formulated in the first decade of the 20th century. About this time, the atomic theory and the corpuscular theory of light (as updated by Einstein)[1] first came to be widely accepted as scientific fact; these latter theories can be viewed as quantum theories of matter and electromagnetic radiation, respectively. Early quantum theory was significantly reformulated in the mid-1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Max Born and Pascual Jordan, (matrix mechanics); Louis de Broglie and Erwin Schrödinger (wave mechanics); and Wolfgang Pauli and Satyendra Nath Bose (statistics of subatomic particles). Moreover, the Copenhagen interpretation of Niels Bohr became widely accepted. By 1930, quantum mechanics had been further unified and formalized by the work of David Hilbert, Paul Dirac and John von Neumann[2] with a greater emphasis placed on measurement in quantum mechanics, the statistical nature of our knowledge of reality, and philosophical speculation about the role of the observer. Quantum mechanics has since permeated throughout many aspects of 20th-century physics and other disciplines including quantum chemistry, quantum electronics, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Much 19th-century physics has been re-evaluated as the classical limit of quantum mechanics and its more advanced developments in terms of quantum field theory, string theory, and speculative quantum gravity theories.

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    Towards Artificial General Intelligence | Oriol Vinyals | TEDxImperialCollege

    14:59

    What is artificial general intelligence and what are researchers doing to achieve this goal today? Oriol, from Google DeepMind, walks you through the answers to these questions with some interesting examples.

    Oriol Vinyals is a Research Scientist at Google DeepMind, working on Deep Learning. Oriol holds a Ph.D. in EECS from University of California, Berkeley, a Masters degree from University of California, San Diego, and a double degree in Mathematics and Telecommunication Engineering from UPC, Barcelona. He is a recipient of the 2011 Microsoft Research PhD Fellowship. He was an early adopter of the new deep learning wave at Berkeley, and in his thesis he focused on non-convex optimization and recurrent neural networks. At Google Brain and Google DeepMind he continues working on his areas of interest, which include artificial intelligence, with particular emphasis on machine learning, language, and vision.

    This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

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